Soccer teams share common goals
Oct21

Soccer teams share common goals

Women’s Soccer Women’s soccer clenched two victories this weekend, shutting out Mississippi College 3-0 and Louisiana College 5-0. Tied for fourth place out of 14 teams, the Oct. 17 and 18 gains advanced the women’s record to 8-5 overall and 7-3 in conference play. Head coach Meghann Brown said the wins solidified the team’s progress over the season. “We started off pretty slow, trying to learn how we play together,” Brown said. “Finally we started getting better. We are young so there are some inconsistent times.” The team is made up of three juniors, three seniors and 13 underclassmen. But the team’s youthfulness has not been too problematic. “They put in about three hours a day,” Brown said. “It’s a tough schedule and a big time commitment … but they are awesome.” Brown said this season’s successes are a result of many factors. “Team unity is big, along with skill and attitude; not backing down when things get tough,” she said. “We also have a very strong defense.” More than the team’s physical health and mental preparation, the relationships between the players has also been important. “Team dynamics are great,” Brown said. “The first two weeks we bonded very quickly, faster than any other team I’ve coached. We couldn’t ask for anything better.” The women’s main goal this season is to win the conference tournament. Brown said this includes maintaining intensity throughout every practice, taking care of each player physically, working hard and eating right. Mickie Arredondo, Ally Sargeant, Megan Jones, Lauren Thorne, Brittany Paxton and Lexy Smith have all been standout players, but the coach believes each person has been an asset. “All 19 of them are key in what we are trying to accomplish here,” Brown said. Forward/attacking man Arredondo was an important player in both matches. She said the recent wins were a result of the team’s continual momentum. “We kept up our intensity … and played together great as a team,” she said. Hours spent on the field isn’t all that goes into the success of a game. Student athletes spend hours preparing for games, studying and doing whatever it takes to maintain good grades. As a biology/pre-med major, Arredondo said balance is a challenge. “The hardest part about being an athlete is time management. We miss a lot of classes so we have to bring our homework on the road.” She believes, however, the Lady Cru has what it takes to be successful in its upcoming games. “We have so much heart on this team,” she said. “We want this so bad and it shows. I think we are accomplishing that.” The women will...

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Plunging economy: What students, parents should know about America’s deepening financial crisis

Jordan Gustin Over the course of a month, the implosion of Wall Street shocked the world and has prompted many to search for the cause. The discovery of denial, greed and rampant corruption is unsettling. The great irony is that clues of the collapse have been around all along. So how could the signs be overlooked, and does it foreshadow the fate of America? A recession is a decline in economic activity (such as a drop in house purchases or a decline of the stock market) for six consecutive months. “There is an almost-certain 99.9 percent chance we are headed for a recession,” finance professor Dr. Larry Woodward said. Woodward offers his advice. “The problem isn’t caused by over-regulation or under-regulation, and we don’t need government to regulate more or regulate less; we need a thoughtful government.” As for whether or not America is headed for another Great Depression, Woodward thinks the only way to follow that path of disaster is if deficit spending continues. How does all this affect college students? Dr. Paul Stock, finance, accounting, and economics chairperson, said, “This crisis might affect college graduates looking for a job in the financial sector. If there is a recession, businesses will be looking to cut costs, and the first place they will cut are the number of employees. Unemployment will go up.” Stock believes that the crisis will impact students’ parents more than the students themselves. He said that parents who are retired “might lose some money in their retirement accounts, and those who are looking to retire in the next three to five years might have to wait. Unfortunately, if there is a recession, there is a good chance many of them will be laid off.” The origins of the financial crisis can be traced back to an act passed by Congress in 1977 called the Community Reinvestment Act. It has essentially forced businesses to sustain a minimum percentage of low-income mortgages every year or risk being fined. These mortgages eventually became the highest amount of loans in any income category. Lenders misled many potential homeowners into higher loans. Just about anyone, regardless of the ability to afford them, was able to take out a home loan. The Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae) and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (Freddie Mac) received preferential treatment from Congress in 1991, giving them an advantage over competitors in that they were not subject to many of the taxes and standards other companies were. This allowed Fannie and Freddie to use their reputable appearance to sell risky low-income mortgages to gullible investors as low-risk investments. The Federal Reserve’s takeover...

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Free vaccinations encourage healthier living

By Angel Bell Students are busy, but in a world full of germs and disease waiting to attach themselves to flesh, it is important to make an effort to prevent sickness by vaccinations. Sophomore sociology major Stacey Davidson believes they are a great idea. “It’s important for students to get vaccinated in order for them to have the best health possible,” she said, “especially at school where diseases have a tendency to travel fast.” The university offered several vaccines in a free shot clinic this month. Sophomore nursing major Megan Skarpa thinks clinics are a good way to help control sickness on campus. “When someone is vaccinated, it not only is a good health choice for them but those around them,” she said. “Being in college, viruses travel fast, and it’s important to take care of yourself and also those around you. The free shot clinic is a very good idea because college students typically do not have a lot of money to spend.” At the clinic on Sept. 29, students were offered five vaccinations. The shots were only available on a first come first served basis and included the meningitis, Gardasil, hepatitis B, MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) and tetanus booster vaccines. Many students may not be familiar with the newer Gardasil vaccine, which is used to help prevent certain strains of the human papilloma virus (HPV) and cervical cancer. UMHB Nurse Debbie Rosenberger believes this vaccine has potential to help protect women against cervical cancer, but she also thinks that people must carefully consider what is done with their own body. “If you are female up to age 26, it is recommended that you receive the Gardasil vaccine,” she said. “You can insure your personal health habits. What you can’t control is your future mate. (Because of) poor choices, this person could carry HPV and give it to you without any symptoms themselves. Then you develop cervical cancer.” The meningitis vaccine is recommended for students living in campus housing. Rosenberger thinks it is better to get rid of a disease before it happens and is looking to attract students to the free clinics who are not able to pay for vaccines. “Prevention beats intervention any day of the week,” she said. “The purpose of (a) shot clinic is to enable those who can’t afford the vaccines to get them. If folks are under-insured, meaning they have insurance but it does not cover vaccines, then they can come.” Rosenberger also recommends an alternate program for younger students. “Any 18-year-old falls under the federal program (called) Vaccines for Children,” she said. This allows them to “receive immunizations at the...

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Team hopes killer season to dig its way up from current stats

Third-year head volleyball Coach Kecia Davis attributes the volleyball team’s rough start this season to inexperience. “We’ve got a lot of young players,” Davis said. “We only have four players returning from last year, one senior, a junior and two sophomores. So we’re very young, and we’re still trying to kind of get that chemistry working.” Coach Davis is a 1986 graduate of UMHB and played volleyaball and basketball while she attended school here. When on the volleyball team, she won an MVP award. The volleyball team has had a rocky start this season with only two wins and 11 losses in overall play. “Our expectations for the season are just for the team to learn some chemistry and especially for the freshmen to transition into collegiate sports,” Davis said. “We’re basically trying to get them together as a team and on the same page, at the same time. They’re working hard on the court and in the weight room, and if each day we have some improvements that’s good enough for me.” UMHB is in the eastern division of the American Southwest Conference. With conference play having already begun last week, the Crusader’s playoff hopes are still very much alive. Though the team’s win/loss record is not the strongest, Davis says the team still may have a chance to make the conference tournament. “In our conference we were picked third.” she said. “The way things work for volleyball is we have an east division with six teams and a west division with seven teams. The top three in each division go to the conference tournament. So we’re just trying to get our foot in the door and get that third spot so as to see what we can do in the tournament.” Players also kept a positive outlook of the upcoming challenge facing the team. “I think the season will improve greatly once we start getting a little more comfortable with one another and picking up our pace,” sophomore management major and team co-captain Erin Maenius said. “We’re adapting to a whole new team. I think a big thing is just getting to know and getting used to everyone on the court together. Once everyone starts meshing well, I think we’ll start seeing a lot more wins in conference.” Maenius was not the only player who remained upbeat about the season. “I think the best thing we can do is just to keep everyone pumped up,” freshman exercise and sports science major Kelsey Gangl said. “During the middle of the game, we start to get down, and it seems like we can’t get our energy back. So I...

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True fans ‘stand ever proud and strong,’ the lazy sit

Gossip, incessant chatter and catching up with friends are supposed to happen at parties and gatherings, not football games. Too many people go to football games and don’t even know the score of the match when it is finished. If everyone sitting in the “student section” were as motivated as our Couch Cru captains, the team could gain an even greater home field advantage. Sports are exciting for both the players and fans; each feeds off of the other’s energy. The more excited that the student body is, the more pumped the players on the field get. Players put their bodies on the line each time they take the field, but some attendees reward this with a lack of encouragement and interest while their backsides are glued to the bleachers. They complain about not being able to see over the mammoth bodies in front of them, but refuse to stand up and grant the team the school spirit and encouragement they deserve. These “fans” are a virus that starts off affecting only a small group of people that spreads throughout the game into a bigger problem. Two sit to chat, then another joins, and another small group sits down to chat, and eventually a small army is sitting, complaining and gossiping. The situation is different in extended pauses in the game such as timeouts, halftime, quarter changes, injuries and blowouts, but for the most part students who are not hurt and don’t have physical disabilities need to stand with pride for the team representing the school as a whole. The school song even states “Dear Mary Hardin-Baylor, who stands ever proud and strong.” The almamater clearly says that UMHB stands. It does not “sit ever proud and strong.” Some “park it” out of laziness and a lack of enthusiasm. The first thing that comes to mind when seeing people who feel they can’t stand for the length of a football game is the movie Wall•E. The summer hit shows the future of the human race, stuck in space (no rhyme intended) and hefty as ever. Human laziness caused the body structure to change and led to a generation of obese, lazy and flat-out boring people. Why take a seat when everything around you is teeming with liveliness, when you can join the cheering, jumping and chanting student body? There are other places to sit. Those not wanting to be a part of the rowdy and supportive crowd of the Couch Cru can sleep with the alumni, faculty and parents who like to...

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Football foes flabbergasted
Sep30

Football foes flabbergasted

With approximately 1,100 in attendance at McMurry University in Abilene, Texas, the Crusader football team rolled over the Indians, 46-0. The Cru is 3-0 overall and 2-0 in division play. Both the offensive and defensive teams contributed to the Sept. 27 game. On the opening possession, UMHB took the ball 62 yards in six plays, ending with a touchdown, giving the Cru a 24-0 game lead. After a 10-yard toss from senior quarterback Josh Saenz to sophomore wide receiver Brian Scott, all of the points were scored in the first quarter. In the second quarter, sophomore tailback Matt Hurst scored two touchdowns.  The Cru’s halftime lead was 39-0. Head coach for nine years,  Coach Pete Fredenburg has an  overall record of 75-25, he is proud of what the team has accomplished over the years, including this season. “We want to improve each week and see where that takes us,” he said. “We always have high expectations.” The team’s hopes were met at Saturday’s game. A mile stone marker was also crossed as Josh Saenz threw a total of 214 yards making UMHB history as the third person to pass more than 200 yards in a single game. Past record holders are Cody Fredenburg and Orlando Garza. Sophomore wide receiver Aerttrail Robinson believes it is more than just the players contributing to the dominating Cru football team. “Both our coaches and our athletes are very good,” he said. “The coaches are very prepared every week, and the players have to be great learners and athletes.” The Crusaders overall statistics for the game turned out to be supreme. Saenz attempted 18 passes, completing 10 of them. Of those successful passes, a total of 214 yards and three touchdowns proved to be successful. Junior wide receiver Pi’Dadro Davis caught two touchdowns and had 106 yards, earning him the honor of having two straight games of running more than 100 yards.  The football team’s total offensive yards turned out to be 375 while 236 of those came from passes. On the defensive side of the game, sophomore defensive back Ben Beckworth and sophomore defensive back Shawn Prettyman each had six defensive tackles. Sophomore No.48 Eric Forward believes that teamwork is how they win games. “Obviously the players are a big part of if we win or lose,” he said. “But also the coaches help and especially the fans. All of these play a huge effect on the outcome.” Saturday, Oct. 4,  will show a test of who has the better team this season, when the Crusaders host their arch rivals—the so far undefeated Hardin-Simmons University. The Cowboys are ranked 24th in the  Division...

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