Tom Brady leads Patriots to epic Super Bowl comeback victory
Feb08

Tom Brady leads Patriots to epic Super Bowl comeback victory

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells It was a game that left the football world Brady Gaga. After a first half in which he played like that impostor in a Tom Brady mask, the New England Patriots’ 39-year-old quarterback put on a Super Bowl performance for the ages Sunday, leading his team back from a 25-point deficit to beat the Atlanta Falcons in overtime, 34-28, in Super Bowl LI. Half the crowd at NRG Stadium was delirious, and half was stunned. But Brady was wholly spectacular, surpassing Hall of Fame quarterbacks Joe Montana and Terry Bradshaw to win his fifth Lombardi Trophy _ a fifth, too, for Bill Belichick, the most of any head coach. “We all brought each other back,” Brady said. “We never felt out of it.” The knockout blow was not a pass, but a run, a two-yard carry around the right side by James White, who pushed his way barely across the plane of the goal line on the first possession of the extra period _ the first overtime game in the 51-year history of the Super Bowl. That the Patriots were even in that position was stunning, considering midway through the third quarter they trailed, 28-3, and had barely registered a pulse. The Falcons looked as if they could coast through the second half and collect the first Super Bowl win in franchise history. Patriots safety Patrick Chung had some blunt criticism for anyone who questions Brady’s place in the pantheon of quarterbacks. “Whoever says that he’s not the greatest,” he said, “you guys are stupid.” Now, for more of the stupefying: The Patriots are the first team to win a postseason game after trailing by more than 16 points in the final quarter. It was also the largest comeback in New England history in any game, with Brady’s previous best being a 24-point comeback against Denver in 2013. “We made history,” defensive end Chris Long said. “We absolutely, positively made history.” With the win, New England became the fourth team with at least five Lombardi Trophies, joining San Francisco (five), Dallas (five) and Pittsburgh (six). Even though the Patriots won by only six, it was their biggest margin of victory in any Super Bowl. Their previous four wins came by three, three, three and four points. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell was loudly booed by New England fans when he presented the trophy to Patriots owner Robert Kraft on the podium, the reaction a byproduct of Brady’s four-game Deflategate suspension. “A lot has transpired over the last two years,” Kraft said as the boos turned to cheers. “And I don’t...

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Sports column: MLB dreams don’t come true
Feb08

Sports column: MLB dreams don’t come true

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells We all have that outlandish childhood dream; that is an unobtainable goal that we think we will undoubtedly reach at some point in our lives. My boyhood dream was always to become a professional baseball player. I never realized how hard that would be to accomplish. And realizing just how far away I actually was to that dream leaves a bitter taste in my mouth. The odds each player has to overcome in order to make it to Major League Baseball (MLB) are almost insurmountable. According to the NCAA, just seven percent of high school baseball players make it to the NCAA and only .003 percent ever end up on an MLB roster. It never enters our minds that this is not just a game for these players— it is their livelihood. We see the big-time contracts on the news— players signing nine-figure contracts. But for most professional ball-players, it is a struggle. There are approximately 6,000 players currently in the MLB minor-league system. According to CNN Money, the players at the lowest level of the minor-leagues are making $1,100 a month and working close to 70 hours a week. This is well below minimum wage. So, while being a professional athlete is a full-time job, many minor league players have to get second jobs in order to continue pursuing their dream. Another thing that generally goes unprocessed, is just how many baseball careers have come to an end due to injury. This is where my story lies. While possibly possessing the necessary skills to succeed in the field, my baseball story was struck down before it had a chance to flourish. As is the case for thousands of players around the world, especially for pitchers. Injuries have become an increasingly prominent part of the baseball landscape. Any way you put it, the game so many love, has the ability to dash the dreams of exactly that many. But those of us who love the game will go on loving it until we no longer have that ability. And those with dreams of the bright lights of Yankee Stadium will keep dreaming until they wake up in Yankee Stadium or wake up in...

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Swishes coming true: An overview of intramural basketball
Feb08

Swishes coming true: An overview of intramural basketball

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells Heart pounding. Beads of sweat dripping. The thrill of running back and forth and dribbling the ball with only one goal in mind – making a basket. Created in 1891 by a physical education instructor named Dr. James Naismith, basketball has become one of the most renowned pastimes in the United States. The sport has been ingrained in today’s culture. When most people think of basketball, they picture NBA stars such as Michael Jordan, LeBron James and Stephen Curry. Some UMHB students got the chance to feel like these mega stars for a moment, when they signed up to participate in the university’s intramural basketball league Many players have had past experience playing basketball and bring that feature to their teams. Robert Harris, a junior exercise physiology major who is on the men’s 5v5 team Play2Win, has had plenty of practice on the courts. “I’ve loved to play basketball since I was about ten,” Harris said. Another student, Sarah Moshier, a senior nursing major who is on the women’s 5v5 team TuneSquad, has also had previous experience with basketball prior to joining intramurals. “I’ve been playing basketball since I was nine or ten so it’s always been something I really love,” Moshier said. “I played basketball in high school so it just made sense to continue playing in college.” Besides having experience, another reason some have joined intramural basketball is to learn more about teamwork and getting along with a lot of different people. “[My favorite part is] just playing with my team and learning how to play with people you don’t play on a team with all the time,” Harris said. One thing that many basketball players agree on is that playing a game is a really good workout. Running back and forth on the courts can burn off a lot of calories. On top of that, basketball can also help to ease stress. “It’s good stress relief to be able to run around and do something I love in the midst of all the nursing school chaos,” Moshier said. But perhaps the most important aspect of being on a basketball team is to have fun and form friendships. Moshier has been on the same team with her friends, TuneSquad, for three years. “I have made a lot of lasting friendships since I really had to reach outside of my usual circle to find girls that could hoop,” Moshier said. Maya Kovalic, a freshman math major who is on the women’s 5v5 team Day Old Pizza, says that she enjoys playing basketball because she gets to laugh, have...

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Cru wins National Championship! – The Band, Cheerleaders,  and the Saderbelles
Jan25

Cru wins National Championship! – The Band, Cheerleaders, and the Saderbelles

Published in the January 25, 2017 issue of The Bells Despite long hours on a cramped bus, frigid Salem temperatures, and even a bus breaking down, the Black Shirt Cru Spirit Band, the Sader Belles, and the cheerleaders took the 20-hour bus ride to Salem, Virginia to help cheer Cru Football to the National Championship. The group left Bawcom Student Union for Salem, Virginia at 5:00 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 15. They were given the opportunity to spend Thursday night at the Gaylord Opryland Hotel before driving the rest of the way to Salem the next morning. The group even ran into some bus trouble as one of the buses carrying the Sader Belles, cheerleaders, and half the band had to pull over on the side of the road due to engine trouble. The students transferred to the fan buses for the remaining hour drive. Upon arriving at Salem Stadium, the band, cheerleaders, and Sader Belles put on a mini CRUise for ESPN, the football players, and the adoring fans. The band and Sader Belles performed a pre-game show on the field in lieu of a halftime performance. Sader Belle sophomore nursing major Amelia Enokian believes dancing at the Stagg Bowl is a memory she will treasure forever. “We were definitely honored that we were able to dance before the game since most schools don’t really take their dance teams,” she said. “I remember exiting the field, and I had smiled so much that my teeth were so dry that I couldn’t stop.” During the game, the group cheered, played stand tunes and kept the enthusiasm alive as the temperatures steadily dropped. “I was glad that we could support our team and provide the spirit necessary to lead them to victory,” senior bass drummer Music Education major Ashley Wallace said. “I had a blast getting to hang out with my friends at the Gaylord Hotel, as well as enduring the cold...

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Cru wins National Championship! – The Fans
Jan25

Cru wins National Championship! – The Fans

Published in the January 25, 2017 issue of The Bells In December, students, parents and fans alike all traveled to Salem, VA to cheer the Crusader football team to their National Championship win. These fans got to experience the game of a lifetime for any UMHB football fan. Mike McCarthy, director of the Campus Activities Board sent six buses full of students, a total of 336 fans, to help cheer on the Cru football team. Although planning for this adventure started about a week-and-a-half before the Stagg Bowl, it didn’t take long for every spot on the fan buses to be filled. The lucky fans who earned a spot on the trip received transportation, a stay at the Opryland Hotel, a ticket to the game, a t-shirt, and a spirit sign. “It was a lot of quick planning, but it was totally worth it to give that experience [of going to a national championship game] to the students,” McCarthy said. Isaac Felan, a sophomore EC-12 Physical Education major, was one of the students that was able to go to the game. He said the experience was a memorable one. “It was an experience for a lot of students; being the loudest we’ve ever been at a game, but also the coldest,” Felan said, “It was awesome to see the guys play and win.” Sharon Rately, a parent that attended the game said, it’s not every day that the “small town” guys become the heroes. “Small towns and thriving cities alike were able to be united as one to support our Crusaders,” she said. The fans that were able to attend the National Championship game cheered their hearts out for the purple and gold, even in the frigid Virginia temperatures. But most attendees said it was worth it to create lasting memories and watch their team become National Champions for the first time in the history of the UMHB football...

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Cru wins National Championship! – The Legacy
Jan25

Cru wins National Championship! – The Legacy

Published in the January 25, 2017 issue of The Bells We all have moments that we know we will remember for the rest of our lives. But when those moments coincide with the 70 men standing at your side, all working toward the same goal, it becomes something much greater. The NCAA Division III National Championship game was a special moment shared by the Cru football team that they will never forget. Unfortunately, few people will ever know the feelings and excitement of this moment. But, through the stories and recollections of those lucky enough to share the moment, those left out can try to understand. “It was great. Honestly, it was a relief, not just for me and the team but for the whole city of Belton. It was great to win one for them,” senior receiver Wykeyhe Walker said. He also shifted the glory to his defense, saying that throughout the whole game the defense was amazing and when senior linebacker Matt Cody caught that pick, he knew the team had won. “At that point I was just looking for my mom,” Walker said. “I climbed in the stands with my helmet on and everything. I was just happy.” Senior quarterback Blake Jackson said he just wants the legacy to live on forever. “For people to remember this as the team who was the first team, not only to win the first national championship, but the team that showed great brotherhood,” he said. Jackson, more than anything else, spoke of the familial feeling among the team. “That whole experience of celebrating with coaches and my brothers was a great feeling and will definitely be a memory I hold on to forever,” he said. Sophomore receiver T.J. Josey said the team really wanted to win not only for themselves, but for the past teams, alumni and the community. “The support for this team is outstanding and it was time to give back,” he said. This is a true testament to what can be accomplished when a team becomes more than just a group of teammates. This was a family, and that camaraderie carried them to the highest honor they could possibly achieve together....

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