Crusaders travel around the globe during summer
Aug26

Crusaders travel around the globe during summer

Published in the Aug. 24, 2016 edition of The Bells This summer break gave many UMHB students the chance to explore the world beyond campus and their hometowns. For several of these globally-minded Crusaders, travelling meant doing mission work and bringing the gospel to unreached people groups. From England to Africa, students made an impact all over the world. Jennifer Callaway – Kenya, Africa Sophomore english and Christian studies double major, Jennifer Callaway spent her time at an orphanage in Kenya, loving on the children of Naomi’s Village. She and the rest of the group from the Cottonwood Creek Baptist Church, spent time playing with the children and making them feel special in the eyes of God. “I have had a passion for Africa since I was in the eighth grade,” Callaway said. “I also know the Lord has called me to minister to orphans and so this was a great opportunity for me.” The group also travelleed to nearby communities to interact with local people. Callaway said her personal goal was to have the Lord shine through her and that He was glorified in everything she did. “My favorite experience on the trip was worshipping around the fire in Swahili with the kids at the orphanage,” she said. Sarah Harvey – India Sophomore Christian studies and marketing double major, Sarah Harvey spent two months in India, working with local villages to help in any way she could. The Christian studies major said her trip included more physical labor than she thought it would, but despite the extra work, she saw God in the midst of chaos. Along with physically assisting the people of India, Harvey and her group also went outside of the city a few times a week to share the gospel with the unreached people of the area. The sophomore says she went to India to be solely obedient to the Lord, and that she had a personal goal of finding the unreached people and sharing the gospel with them. Her favorite experience was sitting in a “stuffy” 10 ft x 10 ft room with 25 other believers. “The Indians were singing in their native language and my partner and I were singing in English. I closed my eyes as we praised the same Father in all different languages. It immediately reminded me o Revelation 7:9-10, ‘After this I looked, and behold, a great multitude that no one could number, from every nation, from all tribes and peoples and languages, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes, with palm branches in their hands, and crying out wtih a loud voice, ‘Salvation...

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From Belton to Afghanistan: one student’s quest to serve his country
Apr02

From Belton to Afghanistan: one student’s quest to serve his country

THE BELLS — Last year, freshman political science major Ishmael Pulczinski left the university to serve with the United States Army in Afghanistan. Pulczinski seeks ways to serve those around him and his country. He planned to become an officer in the Army through the university’s Reserve Officer Training Corps program and had already been serving in the Army Reserves at a chemical unit as a chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear operations specialist, or 74D. “Growing up, I would always play with G. I. Joe men outside, so it was always in the back of my mind,” Pulczinski  said. “What really propelled me into wanting to join was Sept. 11. I was in the third grade when it happened, and when I heard the news, it woke me up that there are people who wish to do harm against this nation and its citizens. I felt compelled to join to help defend this country from those people.” Pulczinski first came to UMHB in the 2011 spring semester after completing Army basic and has always wanted to serve in the political realm. He was in Beall House Council where he lived during the fall and spring semester of the 2012 to 2013 school year. During the spring semester, Pulczinski heard from some of his fellow reservists that a unit was looking for volunteers to deploy during the summer to Afghanistan. He jumped at the opportunity. “I felt like it was something that God wanted me to do. It was something I needed to do,” Pulczinski said. “I added my name to the list of volunteers. It wasn’t until February after I had started my next semester that I learned my name had been selected. So, I dropped my courses and started the training I had to do in order to deploy.” As Pulczinski started to drop his courses, friends and the university were supportive of him. His classes were reimbursed, and his status as a student was left open for him to come back when his service is over. “The fact that he volunteered at the age that he is and quit school completely embodies the person that he is,” said Beall Hall resident director Christan Hammonds. “He cares about people and has a servant’s heart, a genuine gentleman. I have the utmost respect for military personnel, but the fact that he volunteered in the middle of college to go over there says exactly who he is. I’m ready for him to come back.” Currently, Pulczinski plans to be back in May and has already begun the process to return to the university in the fall. Although he misses his...

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Deck the halls with boughs of duck calls
Nov20

Deck the halls with boughs of duck calls

The Robertson family from the hit show Duck Dynasty is at it again. They showed the world that their talents don’t end with making duck calls and hilarious television. On Oct. 29 they released their first Christmas album, Duck The Halls: A Robertson Family Christmas. Listen to one song, and you will quickly see that the humor in the show has transitioned into fun Christmas carols. The album has 14 songs, with some of the more popular  being “Ragin’ Cajun Redneck Christmas,” “Hairy Christmas” and “Duck the Halls.” Every song on the track has its own personality. For instance, in the song “Christmas Cookies,” Phil Robertson talks about Miss Kay’s Christmas cookies, which will surely bring some laughter. You might think that the songs would be poorly done, but in reality the Robertson family can sing. Not only do they do a fantastic job themselves, but they brought in some of the most notable and sought-after voices in the country music industry to accompany them in this album. Luke Bryan, Josh Turner, Alison Krauss and last, but not least, the king of country music himself, George Strait, make an appearance. The songs are a mixture of traditional Christmas hymns with a southern twist, to the Robertsons’ very own construction of Christmas carols.  As many know, they are a religious family and not afraid to confess their love for Christ. This is evident throughout the album. It is currently #1 on the Top Country Albums chart. This should be encouraging—that people who may never listen to Christmas music are getting a true feel of the season The album ends with Phil Robertson saying a prayer that  emphasizes what  Christmas  is all about. Yes, some of the songs are a bit goofy, but a number of songs on the track clearly point out the reason for the season. There is a song for everyone on this album. It mixes country music and Christmas carols perfectly with relevant and meaningful lyrics. I am usually not a fan of Christmas music, but this album is different. “Camouflage and Christmas Lights” stood out to me because it paints a picture of the Christmas season that only people from a small, southern town can appreciate. As well done as these songs are, they could stick around for some time and maybe even become Christmas carols your kids will be listening to. Really, how do you make a better Christmas album than one that has Si Robertson and George Strait in the same song? If you don’t want to buy the whole album, which I strongly encourage, make sure you at least check out some of their...

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A dark day for Texas, a tragedy for America
Nov06

A dark day for Texas, a tragedy for America

Nearly 50 years ago, Dallas, Texas, was the epicenter for a tragedy of historic proportion. Lee Harvey Oswald shot and killed one of America’s most well known and beloved presidents — John F. Kennedy, Nov. 22, 1963. In the convertible with the president was Texas Gov. John Connally, who was shot, but lived. The two unscathed first ladies, Jackie and Nellie, watched in horror as the murder unfolded. Immediately after the bullets hit their target, the limousine began racing toward Parkland Hospital, just on the outskirts of downtown. Today in the U.S., a lot of confusion and mystery still surround the events that led to the assassination. Gary Mack, curator of the Sixth Floor Museum in Dallas, has devoted the majority of his professional life to studying Kennedy, his death and the atmosphere of the city during that politically tumultuous era. The museum specializes in the films and photographs taken the day of the killing. Hundreds of hours of video and a treasure trove of pictures are open to the public. Mack said. “Some Kennedy family members have visited the Sixth Floor Museum. We don’t identify them by name. When they get inquiries about the assassination, they say, ‘call the folks in Dallas. They know that stuff.’” Although the Kennedys may outwardly claim not to have much interest in the assassination, one has to wonder if they’re at least curious. “It’s been interesting to me to observe the public statements the family has made. They’ve always said they’re really not interested in learning this part of the story over and over and over again. They’ve discouraged questions about re-opening the assassination investigations, but it turns out they’re just as curious as everyone else…. Some parts of the story just don’t have a satisfactory answer,” Mack said. One of those parts, the shooter, Oswald, was a shady character who defected to the Soviet Union and came back the U.S. full of bitterness. To help shed light on the events surrounding the murder, a former employee of the Texas School Book Depository spoke as part of the Sixth Floor Museum’s Living History series. Because of a car pooling arrangement, he drove the assassin to work that terrible day. Due to a deteriorating domestic life, Oswald stayed in a Dallas rental house during the week, but went to live with his Russian wife, Marina, in Irving during the weekends. Buell Wesley Frazier, who lived near Irving took pity on Oswald and volunteered to drive him out of the city on Friday afternoons and bring him back to work on Monday mornings. He told him, “Lee, anytime you want to go out and...

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Missions Emphasis Week
Nov06

Missions Emphasis Week

At this point in the semester, students hit a wall as advising, housing and midterms flood the minds of the young scholars, while others work diligently behind the scenes to prepare for them a small breather —Missions Emphasis Week. While planning this annual event, which took place Oct. 21-25, the directors and committee continually strive to stir the hearts of students in more than one way: share Christianity with students and ignite a call to action in believers. “Everyone is called to live like a missionary, even if it’s not overseas,” junior English major and steering committee member Bethany Pittman said. “We wanted to get people involved, (especially) those who did not have a mindset of missions.” The committee’s goal was to expose students on both ends of the spectrum. They did this by urging professors to give missionaries their class period.  As a result, mission workers were scheduled for more than 110 classes before the week began, breaking the campus record, while more were scheduled throughout the week. “We want (students) to connect with missionaries, so this year we really wanted to see the campus get more involved,” junior nursing major and Missions Emphasis Week codirector Joseph Salley said. In addition to in-class discussion, the 40 plus missionaries who strolled the campus last week made their way into several university-wide seminars and various meet-and-greet events. Couples and individuals from every facet of nonprofit mission-based organizations came to tell their story and encourage students to discover their calling. “We share things, but we don’t know what people are going to do,” missionary and co-founder of Volunteer for China, David Wilson, said. “It would be a mistake for me to talk you into going anywhere. You’re just as much a missionary as I am.” Wilson discussed his call for missions with listeners. Both he and his wife, Ann Wilson, worked in professional math and science fields for more than 30 years. Upon retirement, the couple volunteered with various organizations until they founded one of their own. Given their educational background and their retired life status, Wilson described their situation as “ironic.” “I never thought I’d be doing this. I never dreamed that I would be visiting another country or teaching English in China,” he said. Others like Butch and Nell Green, who serve with Cooperative Baptist Fellowship as strategic catalyst for Muslim Internationals, found their calling at their university during their college days. Nell praises the work of the Baptist Student Ministry on her campus and understands the importance of it in the lives of UMHB students. “We were grown, nurtured and called through the BSM,” Nell said. “We just...

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Stadium brings energy to flag football
Nov06

Stadium brings energy to flag football

Crusader Stadium has already proved itself to be a great venue to watch football, but many students didn’t ever think they would have the opportunity to play under the lights at the new facility. However, the intramural flag football championship games were moved from their normal location at the recreational fields to the stadium. “Playing intramurals in the new stadium was awesome. It’s great that they’re finding ways for the whole university to enjoy it. The campus rec staff went all out by introducing the team members, having the national anthem, giving stuff away for free and using the scoreboard during our games,” senior business major Adam Rea said. The idea for moving the championship games to a bigger field where more people could enjoy the games has been on the Student Government Association’s agenda for a number of years. “I think Jonathan Kendall with SGA and Campus Rec tried this in years past with intramural basketball championships being held in the arena. It was never an option for flag football before now,” Director of Campus Recreation Sue Weaver said. The overall atmosphere of the championship games was  one that is usually not felt with intramural games. Playing on such a  stage gave the players a feel of what it would be like to compete in a big game at Crusader Stadium. “The event was absolutely a success. It was a great opportunity for those participating in the games to be recognized and to play in such a great facility. Fans and parents came to watch, and our Campus Rec staff, SGA, and other organizations were recognized,” Weaver said. The hype that was brought to the night gave the team competing and the fans that were there a lot to look forward to. “It was very cool to get to play in Crusader Stadium,” senior business major Tyson Brower said. “We have been playing together all year as a team … and we all really enjoyed the championship games. It gave a different feel to intramurals.” The games were  full of   both big plays and excitement, but the coed championship had the teams and fans biting their fingernails till the last second ran off the jumbotron. “Unfortunately, our coed team came up short, but we had a great time playing together all season, and I made a lot of new friends through intramurals,” Brower said. That One Team was the squad that secured the victory for the coed side of things, while the Dream Killers won the men’s division.  Both teams were awarded T-shirts as well as bragging rights until next year. “Winning intramurals is all about getting the...

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