Owned and published by UMHB, The Bells is a biweekly publication. This content was previously published in print on the Opinions page. Opinions expressed in this section do not necessarily reflect the views of the staff or the university.

Disney purchase gives ‘New Hope’

Princesses, evil rulers thwarting plans and princes sweeping in to save the day. Sounds like a normal Disney movie, but in a few years, a new story will be coming to screen again and this time with light sabers and Jedi. On Oct. 30, The Walt Disney Company bought LucasFilm, Ltd., for $4.5 billion. The company not only bought the Star Wars franchise, it received the entire portfolio from LucasFilms, including Indiana Jones. So does pairing feel forced or will it become a Disney magic in the making? Disney officials said they had been talking to George Lucas, founder of LucasFilms and director of the Star Wars films, about the purchase for a year now. Disney is planning to release Star Wars Episode VII in 2015 with more films expected to continue the saga. The company said it will release a new Star Wars film every one to three years. Lucas will serve as a creative consultant for the next film, but plans to retire eventually. “For the past 35 years, one of my greatest pleasures has been to see Star Wars passed from one generation to the next,” Lucas said, in a statement. “It’s now time for me to pass Star Wars on to a new generation of filmmakers.” The first Star Wars movie, A New Hope, was released in 1977 and starred Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford and Carrie Fisher. Since then Lucas has given the world five more iconic films with the last one being Revenge of the Sith, which was released in 2005. So what is this new era of the iconic saga going to look like? Will Disney rewrite the ending so that it has a happily-ever-after ending? Hundreds of books have been written that begin right from where the last movie finishes, but Disney said that the upcoming movie be an all-new story with no connection to the previous films. With new technology for special effects, new episodes of the saga could improve the quality of the movies. The first three films are more technologically savvy and the last three aren’t. So the films will go from high in special effects, to low and then back to high? Most fans wonder if it is a good idea to touch the film, while others are thrilled and some are undecided. Enthusiasts are asking if original actors will be used from the last film, Return of the Jedi. Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford and Carrie Fisher said in an interview that they knew about the new movie and if asked, they would consider playing their characters. Playing their original roles as the stars of the movie may...

Read More

America spreading aid thin

With wars, crises and upheaval all over the world, America is being asked to aid many hurting nations. Ultimately, the U.S. cannot meet the demands of every person who cries out for aid—there are simply too many of them. We too have our own battles to fight, our own children and our own lives. However, as a Christian nation, we must remember to follow the guidelines set for us in the Bible. Philippians 2:4 says: “Look not every man on his own things, but every man also on the things of others,” (KJV). If we as a nation are to succeed, we must work to ease the burden of hurting nations. Counter to popular notion and human tendencies, lending a hand to others not only helps them, but it helps us. If we follow God in our daily affairs, including our foreign policies, then our nation will be better for it. Take, for example, the crisis in Libya. After their leader Muammar al-Gaddafi’s 42-year reign of terror ended, their nation has still been feeling the repercussions of the unrest. Civil war has led to the deaths of thousands and has caused about a million to flee the country. President Barack Obama reacted by sending aid to Libya in the form of airstrikes and military endeavors against the forces of Gaddafi. According to the New York Times, Obama thought we had a responsibility to intervene in the conflict. He said. “I refused to wait for the images of slaughter and mass graves before taking action.” Had America not intervened, the mass murdering of innocent civilians would have continued. We showed that we have the capability to provide aid without putting our nose into everything. In 2011, a massive earthquake caused a tsunami, which killed thousands of people and ruined resources of Japan. Many countries combined forces to send help to the island so that work could be done in the most productive manner. Had the United States tried to fulfill the burdens alone, there would be problems within our own borders as well. As a nation, we must remember that we, too, need help. Though we won’t be able to take care of every nation, it is vital to help those we...

Read More
Media: Catering to public or conveying trustworthy facts?
Oct30

Media: Catering to public or conveying trustworthy facts?

In 1972 two Washington Post journalists followed a story about a burglary which led them down a path of corruption and lies. The ensuing scandal involved the president and caused his eventual resignation. The Watergate scandal and the investigative work of Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein is an example of the power of the media and its role of protecting society and democratic processes. The freedom of the press has been an essential part of American society since the Revolution. Because the role of the media is providing the public with reliable information, their most valuable asset is credibility. Journalists are expected to adhere to a strict set of ethics. Plagiarism and using false sources are often career-ending offences. In spite of this, the media have been losing much of their trustworthiness over the last decade. According to a recent Gallup poll, 60 percent of Americans have little or no trust in the mass media. This is the highest level of mistrust ever recorded in America and is a sobering fact in an election year. The study showed that distrust was highest among Independents and Republicans. The suspicion is certainly deserved. Many Americans consider the media to be strongly biased or sometimes even false. The main reason to distrust the media is that they have more incentive to minister what the public wants to hear than the actual truth. The news media are businesses that essentially give away information. Newspapers are relatively cheap, and most of the large dailies publish online. Much of their revenue comes from advertising. To hook lucrative advertisements, media outlets need high ratings and subscribers. There is normally a direct correlation between revenue from advertisements and the size of the audience. Instead of providing the truth, the media will provide the public with what they want because it pays. If people care more about the lives of celebrities than they do about local politics or domestic and foreign crises, then news media will provide it. What is frightening is how the media have taken the public’s obsession with celebrities and used it in the way they paint politicians. Likability and charisma have always been important for politicians. The news media generally report superficial things about politicians rather than trying to analyze policy and procedure. In spite of the fact that our culture promotes instant gratification, the truth is actually difficult to find. With the sheer amount of information that is out there, the public is overloaded with data. Most of the news on television consists of sound bites that are taken out of context and slanted to promote media bias. Generally, finding the actual truth...

Read More
Pinterest to blame for unorginality
Oct30

Pinterest to blame for unorginality

“That’s really cute! Did you get it off Pinterest?” For much of the population at the school, this question would be quite a compliment. Others might take offense at the suggestion their latest project was someone else’s idea. People automatically assume that anything crafty or creative is unoriginal, which brings up a good point. In today’s wannabe-artsy generation, is copying a project from Pinterest truly a form of creativity? From a cutesy-crafty point of view, Pinterest is the perfect outlet for collecting ideas and creating a virtual dream world. Users can upload or “pin” images and organize them into personalized categories called boards. A few of the top subjects include recipes, workout tips, crafts, dream weddings and fashion. Launched in March 2010, the social scrapbook reached more than 11 million users before its second anniversary. The thought behind collecting ideas on virtual bulletin boards filled a void in the world of social media. More meaningful than liking a page on Facebook, pinning offers users the chance to paint a personalized picture of who they are based on individual interests, taste and style. According to the mission statement, Pinterest was created with the purpose of helping people relate over common pursuits. Its goal, as stated on the website, is to connect users around the world through shared interests, taste, humor and style. But the amount of originality on the website is greatly lacking. Many of the pins become trapped in an endless cycle, copied time and time again to boards across the globe and thus stifling the individuality of being creative. The number of repeated pins can be annoying. Even worse, users commonly admit to spending hours at a time on Pinterest and even becoming addicted to pinning. They spend more time sitting in front of their computer screens pinning recipes and crafts than they do actually cooking and creating. One quote wryly repinned by users serves to poke fun at the website: “Thank you, Pinterest, for helping me feel creative even though I’ve really just been sitting at my computer for three hours.” On the other hand, some members make an effort to take their ideas and put them to good use. They have Pinterest parties with friends, and they cook, paint or make scarves from old T-shirts. Cynics might see these parties through the lens of friends gathering in one place to make unoriginal, often useless crafts. In many cases Pinterest inspires a sort of cookie-cutter creativity, resulting in exact copies or projects slightly tweaked for a more personalized fit. Sadly, attempting to copy the cute DIY projects is often accompanied by a sense of dissatisfaction. Trying too...

Read More

Letter to the Editor

This is a response to the October 2 Bells writing that referred to Muslims, and ostensibly a film, in a tenor exemplified by such phrases throughout as “no brains, brainless mobs in the Muslim world, turned violent, ridiculous, unruly crowd, irrational, herd mentality, against their better judgment, dangerous, scary, politically profitable to defend the honor of Islam, violent mob, blind obedience,” on par with crass media stereotypes of Muslims, film or no film. No comparison/framework is given characterizing Christians who kill millions throughout history, or even in reference to U.S. un-Christian policies in the Middle East. A film or any one thing (such as the acquittal of police beating a Black) is basically only a precipitating factor as it called in social science, and blowback (as the CIA refers to responses to those policies of ours deemed criminal and immoral) occurs, or as a Congressperson admitted, there was already a “long line of attacks on Western diplomats and officials in Libya in the months leading up to September 11, 2012.” Since we are in academics, note that much of Islam and Arabic culture laid the foundation for much of academia. Since we refer to ourselves as being in Christian academia, note that Islamic and Arabic cultural emphasis is on hospitality to others. In fact regarding the latter, a Waco Baptist missionary who has been in the Middle East for 30 years reiterated that here recently as well. Dr. Jose Martinez,...

Read More
Politics vs social sites
Oct30

Politics vs social sites

The old saying about not discussing religion or politics seems to be as outdated these days as parachute pants and VHS tapes, at least when it comes to the latter. If you’ve been on any form of social media in the past couple of weeks, no doubt your newsfeeds have been inundated with posts and tweets about the presidential debates and upcoming election. From loyal Obama backers to rallying Romney supporters to independents and those who just “don’t care at all,” it seems as though everyone has an opinion. And social media has been the place to share it. While the Web can serve as a good spring board for exercising the right to free speech, it can also become an avenue for bitter arguments between friends, family and even strangers,when it comes to a topic as volatile as politics. But because people can hide behind a monitor and say whatever they want, the Internet has become a place to blast, not only candidates, but every belief, opinion or conviction someone else may hold. Apparently all old adages have been thrown out the window because the wisdom of not saying anything at all if you can’t say something nice has also been discounted as people take to their keyboards and computer screens to vent about who said what during the debates. Sure, political conversation can be a great thing. And the fact that we have the freedom to engage in such conversations so openly is a right we should not take for granted. However, what good is it doing anyone to rant on Facebook about your opinions without any regard for whom you may offend? It’s almost enough to make you think twice about logging on to social media sites at all. Who wants to be berated with one hostile statement after another when all you really wanted was to look at pictures of your best friend’s cruise or read a humorous post about someone’s day? And it doesn’t just stop at one comment. If you’re looking to garner attention on your wall or feed, just say something offensive about one of the presidential candidates or mock something they said on national television during the debates. Soon, your friends and followers, and possibly their friends and followers, will engage in an argument that goes on for hours, or even days if you’re lucky. And usually, the conversation turns into petty name calling that has little or nothing to do with the original post. The truth is, it’s unlikely that what is said on any social media site in a moment of annoyance while watching a debate is ever going...

Read More
Page 31 of 64« First...1020...2930313233...405060...Last »