Owned and published by UMHB, The Bells is a biweekly publication. This content was previously published in print on the Opinions page. Opinions expressed in this section do not necessarily reflect the views of the staff or the university.

Letter from the Editor
Aug23

Letter from the Editor

“What did you do this summer?” This was a popular essay topic we were tasked to answer in our years in leading up to college. And although we are no longer asked to fill up a spiral with adventures at water parks and campgrounds, comparing summer vacations is still popular among students. As editor of The Bells, I have a medium in which to share my summer happenings. So here’s a taste of what I experienced. During the last week of June, I took a road trip to Colorado and Wyoming with my two sisters, my parents and my grandmother. We stopped in Colorado Springs to visit my aunt and uncle, where we also visited the Garden of the Gods. We took plenty of Instagram-worthy pictures of the red rock formations that rise up from the ground. Being the sentimentalist that I am, I convinced everyone to scour the park for a certain rock formation that we’d stood in front of six years prior to recreate a family-loved photo. From there, we headed to Grand Tetons National Park. Once we left Jackson Hole, Wyoming, we no longer had cell phone service antil we traveled back through three days later. As soon as we drove into the park, we passed signs warning us of nearby bears, which had us all pressing our noses to the car window in search of a black bear. During our first morning in the Grand Tetons, I convinced my family to rent kayaks. I took a single, and everyone else rode in tandem. We were given a map of the area and told to return in two hours. Getting out on the water, feeling the cold wind flood through my jacket and being surrounded by the majestic mountains created an exhilarating experience. An hour into kayaking, we knew that trouble was approaching in the form of dark storm clouds. From there, it was a race against time to get back to the marina before the storm hit. Once we safely got back to the marina, we drove into Yellowstone National Park. We got to see Old Faithful, a geyser known for shooting out water high into the air every hour-and-a-half. Once I returned from Wyoming, I boarded a plane with my 17-year-old sister, Haley, to Anchorage, Alaska for a mission trip. I will never be the same after this trip. We started our trip out with a glacier tour. Then, we had the privilege of visiting four churches in the area, where we helped knock on doors, distribute door hangers, pray with people, sing and preach atrevival services, and assist with electrical work. One of...

Read More
World’s best cup of coffee
Apr26

World’s best cup of coffee

Published in the April 26, 2017 issue of The Bells People like to joke that coffee is the lifeblood of a college student. Everyone acts as though we run on caffeine And in all fairness, we play into the stereotype quite often. The problem is that when most students choose to go, they choose more often than not to visit a corporate coffee chain. And why shouldn’t they? We have one on campus, and off-campus – they are everywhere. They are convenient, they work fairly quickly, and the atmosphere usually makes it worth hanging out for a while. But there are better options, like visiting local coffee places or ordering beans online and making your own. Most of my experience with coffee has either been at Starbucks, when I was around junior high age, or at a shop at home where I worked for nearly three years. I am not exaggerating when I say that the owner of the shop hated each and every one of the giants that dominate the coffee industry. He did research into some of the larger brands, and found some issues with how they treat their product. One of the facts about coffee that most people do not know is that it goes stale but not “bad.” It loses most of its taste, but does not expire. Ideally though, when you make coffee, your beans were roasted less than a month beforehand. At most of the big-name places, coffee can be sitting around for up to six months. And more often than not, the coffee is over-roasted. This one is less avoidable. Big companies have to make sure they provide all of their stores with beans that will end up tasting the same when they are made into drinks, and they have to do it in bulk. But that causes issues for small shops, because customers come in expecting that what they ask for in more mainstream shops will taste the same there. And it makes them angry when they get the wrong roast or blend, which just drives them back to the bigger chains. Cups cause a bigger issue than you might think as well. You cannot walk into a small shop and ask for a size that you would get elsewhere. Just use the terms “small,” “medium” or “large,” please. If a company uses other sizes, they are likely branded and unusable by other companies. Small, local places lack all the drama of a larger brand. The names of the drinks are straightforward, the sizes make sense, and the employees are usually friendlier. They generally have the same kind of atmosphere, where...

Read More
What I learned as a freshman
Apr26

What I learned as a freshman

Oh, Freshmen year. It is a time of adjustment, growth and new beginnings. It is when a person is completely confused about what is happening, but has a blast anyway. Freshmen year is two semesters of struggles and immeasurable joy. With all the lessons I have learned these past nine months, 18 stick out. Here are the top lessons I have learned while being at the bottom of the college food chain. 1.“Meyer” does not refer to the Isabelle Rutherford-Meyer Nursing building. If you go to the nursing building for your 8 a.m. New Testament class, you will be thoroughly embarrassed. 2.Make a friend who knows how to open a mail box. Those locks are tricky, man. 3. Do not be afraid to go to a meeting on campus by yourself. Put yourself out there and meet someone new. 4. T-shirt giveaways are INTENSE. Turn on Twitter notifications and be ready to run. Fist fights are discouraged but not out of the question if a Play Day tank is involved. 5.If you see a car parked and running at night but the headlights are off—do not look in. They are probably making out. 6.That orange powder from the grass on your shoes is pollen, not Dorito cheese. 7.Spend time alone. Intentionally set aside time to go to the lake or Arusha’s by yourself. Recharge and enjoy. 8.If Olivia is grilling in Bawcom, get your booty over there. 9.Do. Not. Pull. Through. Campus Police can sense a change in the force and they will find you. 10.FOMO (fear of missing out) is real. Very real. You have to learn that you simply cannot attend every adventure your friends have. 11.Your faith will officially become your own freshman year. What you believe and how you choose to live it out is up to you. Take this newfound freedom seriously. 12.Put your phone down. 13.Put your phone down. 14.Put your phone down. 15.Though it may not look like it, everyone is struggling somehow. Never feel isolated in your pain or confusion. We all have baggage and we all need a savior. 16.Go check-out a children’s book from the library and read a friend a bedtime story. I personally suggest the Berenstein Bears. 17.Take advantage of our beautifully luscious grass. Walk barefoot and enjoy the sunshine. 18.Spend every day thanking Jesus that you are a...

Read More
Bible journaling- a great way to strengthen faith
Apr26

Bible journaling- a great way to strengthen faith

Published in the April 26, 2017 issue of The Bells Do you yearn to delve deeper into the Word of God?  Recently, a friend showed me various drawings she’d made based on scripture, and since then I’ve been hooked. Bible journaling, sometimes known as Illustrated Faith, is a great way to interact with God’s Word in a different way. Here are my tips for Bible journaling: 1.What do I journal in? You can begin Bible journaling in a spiral notebook, on loose-leaf sheets of notebook paper, in a regular Bible, or you can buy a specific Bible made for journaling. These Bibles are made with blank space in the margins that are wide enough to draw pictures.  Check out some examples of journaling bibles at http://www.lifeway.com/n/Type/Journaling-Bible. I would recommend using something different than your main study Bible for Bible journaling because sometimes your pictures may cover the text, which might make it hard to read your Bible in the future. 2.Where do I begin? You have your Bible journal. Now what? Read the Word. Does a specific verse stick out to you? Then draw a picture or maybe write the scripture in fancy text. Here’s an example: Matthew 28:19 states, “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost.” To make a Bible journal entry for this verse, I might draw a map of the world and color it. If you’re not an artist, that’s okay.  It’s your own way to connect with God. Just be creative and have fun.  When you’re first beginning, you might make mistakes, but that’s one thing that makes Bible journaling fun. No two drawings are the same. 3.What materials do I use? I always begin with pencil because I make mistakes all the time. Don’t be afraid to use the whole page. Or just use the margins. It’s up to you. Once you have your picture drawn out, then it’s time to experiment. I enjoy using black pen (for outlining the drawing), crayons, map pencils, oil pastels, and water colors. Be forewarned, watercolors give a whole new dimension to your drawings, but they are very hard to use without bleeding through to the next page. You can also use scrap- book supplies such as stickers, stamps, colored paper, and washi tape. Dayspring.com sells Bible journaling supplies, like paper cutouts, clear stamp and journaling Bibles. 4.What if I don’t have any ideas on what to draw? Pinterest is full of Bible journaling ideas that other journalists have done in the past.  I get most of my ideas from Pinterest, and I...

Read More
Private education provides quality over quantity
Mar29

Private education provides quality over quantity

Published in the March 29, 2017 issue of The Bells Parents must decide where their children will excel and prosper. The debate between private and public schools has been an ongoing dispute since the beginning of time. As any parent who has toured both sides of the spectrum, there are very distinct differences. I have attended a private institution my entire academic career, and I will admit I am completely biased toward private education. My biased opinion stems from my multiple encounters in a public school environment. The most obvious difference between private and public school is the money. The good news for public schools is that they cannot charge tuition. The bad news is that they are funded through federal, state, and local taxes. The limited funds may not be dispersed evenly or where the needs are most necessary. For private schools, the money comes from tuition, donations and funding. Since private schools generate their own funding, they do not have to follow certain regulations like public schools. Private schools control when and where their assets come into play. The next obvious distinction between private and public schools comes through the admissions process. Public schools cannot deny a student into a public education system. By law, public schools must accept a student. Unfortunately, public schools do not take into consideration a parent’s choice in where their child goes. The residency of the family determines what school the child will be enrolled in. Private schools are not required to accept every candidate. The process for admission is selective and determined through interviews, essays, and tests. Requirements for teachers also differ between private and public schools. Public school teachers must be certified through the state, including a completed course load and student teaching. They must teach a standard curriculum within the state guidelines. Private school teachers, on the other hand, do not necessarily have to have certification, but more of a display of expertise in their specific field. They have the freedom to teach whatever curriculum they see fit. The choice to decide what to teach may strengthen or hinder the student’s education. Alongside teachers and curriculum comes class size. Public schools tend to keep class size small during the early elementary years. Once they transition into high school, the class sizes grow in numbers. Private schools tend to keep the student-to-teacher ratio relatively low. I will always choose a private education over public education for the simple fact of quality over quantity. I have seen the classroom size exceeding its limit, ultimately taking away individual attention. Private school teachers interact with students enough to sense a problem, either emotionally...

Read More
Travel while you still can
Mar29

Travel while you still can

Published in the March 29, 2017 issue of The Bells Travel opens up so many doors, creates new opportunities, and leaves endless memories. Young and old desire to feel the spark that comes with traveling. However, for those who are older, it is much more feasible than for the typical college student. Although traveling in your early twenties may create a heavier financial burden, I believe that it is something that everyone should do at least once. I know that traveling is expensive. I know that most of us are completely broke. But, we should all save up a little money and go to a place we have dreamed about. There are ways to make that happen, and at an affordable rate too. You don’t have to stay at the fanciest hotels. We are in college. We can deal with something that isn’t five-star. And if the place you want to go is in the states, you can save massive amounts of money by road tripping it. It is cheaper and will just add to the experience. Travel in your twenties is also a way of acting more grown up. I’m sure that most people have taken family vacations, but this is different. This is something that you plan. It can be with a friend, or a group of friends or even just by yourself. And the best part about it is that you will enjoy the experience even more because you get to pick what sites you visit. This means not getting stuck in the Museum of Toilets for hours because your dad has to read all of the signs. Instead, you can skip that museum entirely. Taking vacations early will give you more of an experience. In your twenties, you’re either in college or have just graduated. In the grand scheme of things, you have very few responsibilities. You are most likely not a parent, which means that you don’t have to worry about your getaway turning into a family vacation. You are also young and full of life. You will get the chance to stay out later and experience more of the nightlife. It also means that you’ll probably have more energy to make days longer and get the most out of each day. If you don’t think that a real week-long vacation is doable, look into taking weekend trips in-state to a place you haven’t visited. Or you can get a cheap flight and fly somewhere one day and return the next. Just go out and experience something that you haven’t done before. You don’t want to look back on your life and regret not...

Read More
Page 1 of 5912345...102030...Last »