Crusader alumnus signs with former world series champions Washington Nationals
Nov05

Crusader alumnus signs with former world series champions Washington Nationals

Landon Dietrich sits with his parents, Chris and Melisa Dieterich, as he signs to the Washington National’s rookie developmental league, the Gulf Coastal League Nationals on June 22, 2020. He signed at home, due to COVID-19 restrictions. Former Crusader baseball player Landon Dieterich was drafted earlier this year to the World Series Champions, the Washington Nationals. In the history of the UMHB baseball program, only 8 players had been drafted. Dieterich raised the number to 9. The road to the majors is very long and full of difficulty, and to do so from Division Three baseball makes the journey all the more difficult. Most college athletes play merely to enjoy the sport they love for four more years, and to develop as a person. Very few actually make it to the next level in any sport. UMHB faced Schreiner Univ. in the home series opener at Red Murff Field, Belton, on Saturday, February 15, 2020. While Dieterich is only playing currently in a rookie developmental league with the Gulf Coast League (GLC), this is an important step that many great players have had to take. Dieterich already seems to understand the importance and difficulty of where he is at. “I am absolutely blessed,” Dietrich said.  “I realize it is a rare opportunity, and I just hope to make everyone proud.”                        Dieterich was never alone in his journey towards where he is today. Along the way he had many of his close friends and family to guide him and give him support whenever he needed it. UMHB and its students and faculty were also a big part of his support system. “UMHB was everything to my baseball career,” Dietrich said.  “It made me into the player and person I am. Everyone from coaches to professors. Definitely the best 4 years of my life.”  His years playing for UMHB mean more to him than most people may understand. “A lot of people do not realize UMHB was my only chance to play baseball,” Dieterich said, “No one else wanted to take a chance on me back then.” However, his job upon graduation from UMHB was not guaranteed, so going through the drafting process was stressful.   “[The draft] started off super stressful, and the stress just kept growing,” Dietrich said. “After all, this was a lifelong dream. So, eventually, I just had to let it go and trust whatever God had for me.” UMHB faced Southwestern Univ. at Red Murff Field, Belton, on Tuesday, February 18, 2020. Dieterich said that he had so many memorable moments while playing at UMHB he could not pinpoint the most memorable. “I think we would need...

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Elizabeth Franklin crowned Miss MHB
Nov05

Elizabeth Franklin crowned Miss MHB

Elizabeth Franklin is crowned Miss MHB at Walton Chapel on Saturday, Oct. 31, 2020 as previous Miss MHB winner Molly Rodeffer applauds at right. Photo by Gavin Green By Reagan Murr Elizabeth Franklin won the Miss MHB 2020-2021 title at Walton Chaple on Halloween night, Saturday, Oct. 31. She was crowned at a unqiue Miss MHB pageant with social distancing in place. Franklin, a junior psychology major from Georgetown represented the student recruiting organization Search CRU. For 50 years, the annual Miss MHB pageant provided young female students at UMHB the chance to show off their talents while advocating for causes that are important to them, and make new friends.  Even with the challenges that COVID-19 presents, the pageant continued to play a vital role on UMHB’s campus this year. “It’s a chance to get to know people and be silly and dance,” said senior Miss MHB contestant Alissa Edgington.  “[Miss MHB] is a chance to meet new people and get yourself out of your comfort zone.” Kaysie Sparks, a former Miss MHB contestant, directed this year’s pageant.  Sparks’ experience as a participant created a desire to put her own spin on the event. As director, she was responsible for getting the contestants ready for their pageant performances. “People all the time think that we just throw the girls on stage and this is all stuff they do on their own, but we practice three times a week from 5:45 to 9 o’clock,” said Sparks. This training begins about a month and a half before the actual show. “We go over every detail of pageant with them,” Sparks said. “We practice anything from walking in heels to how they’re going to give their platform speech to the judges. They kind of do everything.” Eunice Michaelson, who participated in last year’s pageant, expressed how intimidating being the pageant can be at first. “It’s almost like syllabus week,” Michaelson said. “You’re taking it all in, and that’s kind of how the first week of pageant is.  [There’s] this long list of things to do, and it can feel overwhelming.” But Michaelson also said that once practices began, it felt much more manageable.  “It grew to be this really comfortable thing where we all knew each other, we all got comfortable with each other’s talent,” Michaelson said.  “We just kind of formed this bond.” Elizabeth Franklin was crowned Miss MHB on Saturday, Oct. 31, 2020. Photo by Gavin Green An article in The Bells, “Miss Search Cru wins Miss MHB 2020” by Destinee Reinauer, highlighted the camaraderie of the girls as the pageant winner, Molly Rodeffer, was announced last year.  The goal...

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The impact of COVID-19 on UMHB’s nursing program
Oct05

The impact of COVID-19 on UMHB’s nursing program

By Regan Murr The spread of COVID-19 has had a dramatic effect across the globe and, most noticeably, on the medical field.  Nurses stand on the front lines in the fight against the coronavirus, often at great personal risk, as they struggle to combat the pandemic.  This outbreak, coupled with an ongoing nursing shortage in the United States, has profoundly impacted the environment that future nursing students must confront after they graduate.  At the University of Mary Hardin- Baylor, students in the nursing program face having to adapt to many changes in learning methods and class structures, while also preparing for their future careers in a profession that continues to face unique challenges. Molly Radar, a senior nursing student at the university, plans to work in pediatrics after her graduation next spring.  She describes the transition to CRUflex classes this semester as “cool, but…wild and weird.” “It’s crazy that I will be starting a job, maybe, during a global pandemic,” said Radar.  “It’s kind of terrifying.” Junior UMHB nursing major Hannah Glass studies in between classes for an upcoming exam in the Townsend Memorial Library on campus in September 2020. Photo by Malaika Randolph At the same time, the pandemic has highlighted, perhaps more than ever, the need for more nurses in the workforce.  According to the American Nurses Association, there is projected to be far more nursing jobs available as compared to any other profession in 2022.  The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that 1.1 million new registered nurses will be needed by 2022 to replace retirees and to avoid a continued shortage. When asked whether or not she was concerned about her future career during COVID-19, senior nursing student Sarah Hughes said: “No, because we’re needed.” Hughes also stated that she felt ready to enter the profession. “As nurses, we’re going to be dealing with a whole lot of infectious stuff all the time,” Hughes said.  “This is just a new infectious disease that we have to deal with.” Junior UMHB nursing major Hannah Glass studies in between classes for an upcoming exam in the Townsend Memorial Library on campus in September 2020. Photo by Malaika Randolph Nursing schools may also be facing dramatic fluctuations in applications due to COVID-19.  According to Ilana Kowarski’s  article in  U.S. News and World Report , “How coronavirus affects nursing school admissions,”  universities such as Villanova in Pennsylvania and Regis College in Massachusetts, have witnessed an increase in nursing school applications, which may be due to the pandemic. Still, it is possible that safety concerns may result in fewer applicants to nursing schools across the board, according to Kowarski’s article.  Only...

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Flu shots now available on campus!
Sep24

Flu shots now available on campus!

It is already time to get a flu shot, and because of COVID, it is especially important to take care that this year, as soon as possible. With COVID-19 being one respiratory illness we have to be vigilantly guard against, having the risk of a second respiratory disease infecting people at the same time presents and even worse scenario. This possibility of two respiratory diseases infecting people either at once or in tandem, affects individuals as well as the collective on campus and all of us at home with our families and loved ones. It also presents, with more people sick from two diseases, the chance that hospitals will be inundated this season. To help get better control over our health this season for yourself and others, you can schedule your flu shot with Nurse Debbie  (Rosenberger, CSN, RN-BC) in Health Services in the Mabee Student Success Center building on the third floor. She has provided the following information about getting the shot: Flu shots are now available for $20 – cash or check; while supplies last. To get the shot, please Email healthservices@umhb.edu with your ID number and date and time at which you would like to have an appointment, and you will receive an email confirmation.  (There are NO appointments between noon-1pm daily.)  Bring your filled out flu shot consent form and have your funds ready. Again, BRING your completed form and $20 with you to the appointment.   Also, be sure to maintain social distancing and wear your mask.  If you are ill – do NOT keep your appointment. Nurse Debbie will need you to have already filled out and signed a consent form for the shot. You can download it and print it out, and sign and again, be sure to take it with you.  It can be found here. The flu shot is especially important this year because the COVID virus will still be something any of us can catch, and we have been warned of a second wave of infections. Therefore, we need to be sure we are protected from at least one of these diseases that we can already control with a vaccine. Nurse Debbie says another reason to get the flu shot this season is that, as the CDC advises points out, it prevents suspicions of COVID from putting more people in quarantine and/or in isolation for 10-14 days, which can be a long time when trying to complete a semester of school.  Although some people feel that they have flu symptom after taking the shot, that is because the antibodies are working to protect the body from the more serious outbreak. Most people...

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Cultures displayed at UMHB festival
Apr02

Cultures displayed at UMHB festival

The Multicultural Festival is an annual event that is put together to celebrate the diverse cultures that are on UMHB’s campus. This year’s event was held on Wednesday, March 20 on the third floor of Bawcom Student Union. Many different events took place at the event to feature and appreciate culture. Some of the events included a Tai Chi demonstration, praise dance, Mandarin poem readings, henna tattoos and traditional Japanese tea ceremonies. The first event of the night was a Tai Chi demonstration to relax. However, he changed directions when he stated that it could also be used for self- defense. The demonstration was interactive, as he got students to participate, and it was very informative. Another interesting event that took place during the night was a praise dance demonstration that was put on by junior nursing major Skaiye Finney. She did an outstanding job at incorporating worship into this event. Her dance was very interpretive and she also incorporated sign language. Before she began, she shared a quick PowerPoint about the background of praise and worship dancing. Her showcase was also very interactive, as she got the audience to sign with her as she danced. Spanish students and professors took time to read poems in Spanish with the audience. Dr. Madison, professor of UMHB’s Spanish I and II classes, was not planning on reading a poem, but she was asked to read a poem for the audience in place of a student that could not make it. She read a poem titled “Bala- da de los abuelos” by Nicolas Guillen. The poem was about an Afro-Cuban man that had to deal with two different kinds of racism while in Cuba. It was a very moving piece and was well-recited by Dr. Madison. Several cultures were on display, and the people that attended the event were able to learn about cultures with which they were unfamiliar. Many people came to partake in this showcase of cultures and left with a better understanding and appreciation of them. This is an event you do not want to miss when it comes around next...

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Students honor Month of the Military Child
Apr02

Students honor Month of the Military Child

The month of April is known for numerous holidays such as Easter, April Fools’ Day and Earth Day. However, what many people don’t know is that April is also the Month of the Military Child. This is a special time of the year dedicated to honoring the children of military parents all over the world. UMHB takes great pride in recognizing students who fall into that category. There are approximately two million military children all over the U.S., ranging from newborns all the way up to 18-year-olds (sheerid). Their lives seem to be no easy task, as many of them endure lots of challenges such as anxiety, separation and relocation. “One of the most challenging things about being a military kid is moving around,” said Micki Hutchins, a freshman social work major. “I learned to only make surface-level friends because moving away from a best friend after two to three years over and over again became too painful. However, I have a great relationship with my immediate family because of this.” Many organizations around the world take advantage of the month and hold events to honor those who are children of military parents. The Department of Defense Education Activity and The Department of Defense team work together to encourage schools to plan events dedicated to the Month of the Military Child. Operation Megaphone is a worldwide event dedicated to connecting military teens around the world and helping them discuss everyday issues that they face. Many group seven hold specific days for  people to wear purple in an effort to show their support. A lot of organizations also hold events such as contests and festivals. Senior filmstudies major Viranda Brooks described events that she has participated in. “When I was younger and lived on a base in Germany, they had a big carnival with free prizes and food,” she said. “It was a lot of fun.” While their parents are deployed in other parts of the country, many dependents have to find ways to cope with the fact that their parents are gone. Some children do not understand why their parents have to leave for such long periods of time, and this can make them angry. Being able to communicate is one of the most important ways children of military parents can deal with their parents’ absence. Writing letters is one of the main ways they communicate, as many people in the military do not have access to cell phones or other communication devices. It is also important for people of authority such as teachers, counselors and non-military parents to be as helpful and supportive as possible. “I would always go to my mom and see...

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