George ‘W’ Bush story told by Hollywood screen
Nov04

George ‘W’ Bush story told by Hollywood screen

Although many speculated that the film directed by well-known liberal Oliver Stone on the life  of the current president, George W. Bush, would be a cheap jab at the president in his last few months as commander in chief, they could not have been more wrong. Stone himself admitted during an interview on the popular television program The Colbert Report, his motives for making the movie were not entirely pure. However, during the making of the film, Stone said that he had a change of heart. During the televised interview Stone said, “Making the movie really kind of opened my eyes to this guy Bush. I really started to like him. He’s a great man, and I believe he’s on his way to being a great president.” The film stars Josh Brolin (No Country for Old Men, American Gangster) portraying “W” from his childhood to the Iraq war. The star- studded cast includes, Elizabeth Banks as Laura Bush, Richard Dreyfuss as Dick Cheney, James Cromwell as George Herbert Walker Bush, Ellen Burstyn as Barbara Bush, Scott Glenn as Donald Rumsfeld and Toby Jones as Karl Rove. While Brolin comes away with an astounding performance as the film’s protagonist, it is perhaps the rest of the cast that truly brings the story to life, particularly the performances of both Jeffrey Wright, who portrays Gen. Colin Powell, and Thandie Newton as Condoleezza Rice. “W” chronicles the life of Bush, traveling back and forth between flashbacks of young Bush attempting to escape from his father’s shadow to behind closed doors in the cabinet of the President of the United States. The film is designed to give audiences a new perspective on the current administration from the viewpoint of the presidency. It has both lighthearted moments and those of high drama and should be considered one of the best films of the year. The film runs for 129 minutes and is rated PG-13 for language, including sexual references, some alcohol abuse, smoking and brief disturbing war images. The film is a must see, if not simply for the breathtaking performances — for the even-handed glance at the highest office in the United States. Its message of hope and redemption speaks to the lost American dream. For those who hate Bush, this is a chance to understand him. For those who love him, this is a chance to see him for the man he truly...

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Students take stage, publish works
Nov04

Students take stage, publish works

Even though it’s not the typical coffee house setting, a hushed audience and a list of performers packed the SUB for a night filled with creativity and student participation. The first Open Mic Nite of the semester was preceded by the unveiling of the university’s annual publication, the Baylorian. “It’s great that we’re getting to see a lot more of the arts publicized around campus,” assistant campus activities director, Jeff Sutton, said. “And the best part is that students are showing up and wanting more.” In October, the 2008-09 edition of the Baylorian was made available for purchase. That evening, a small group of students gathered at the amphitheater to read aloud some of the recently published work. Immediately after, Open Mic Nite commenced. Last semester Open Mic Nite was introduced to the students as a venue allowing musicians, writers and storytellers to showcase their talents in front of an audience. Now, the event is returning with the same vision. “It’s cool because we’re not affiliated with anything — with any organization. Open Mic Nite is totally student-led and relies on us to participate for it to be a success. I think it has been,” senior philosophy and theology major, Andy Wayland, said. Almost in the same vein, the Baylorian is a published collection of short stories, poetry, artwork and literary criticism that can only be possible through the submissions of faculty, alumni and students. “There are so many great voices from people at our school, and without those voices, we wouldn’t have our publication,” senior managing editor, Russel Dotson said. “We thoroughly evaluate every submission and try our best to give the authors and artists a chance to see their work in print.” Last year’s editor, senior English major Kaylynn Bishop, hosted the Baylorian unveiling and also performed in Open Mic. “I feel like Open Mic Nite and the Baylorian are two visions that cohabitate very well,” Bishop said. “Both involve artistic endeavors going public, and I think it’s great that our school body is taking more involvement in those areas.” Next year’s publication of the Baylorian is already accepting submissions. Students or alumni interested should send their work as an attached document to baylorian2009@yahoo.com. The deadline is Jan....

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Crusader Knight ’97 in band
Nov04

Crusader Knight ’97 in band

Jason Baird, Mr. Crusader Knight of 1997, used to wear the sought-after crown. Representing Burt Hall, he entertained students with a two-minute video that was voted students’ and judges’ choice for favorite video his sophomore year in college. Now Baird stands on stage for a different crowd. He is a singer and bass player for Austin’s Bridge, an up-and-coming band known for its bluegrass, country feel. According to Christianity Today, their sound can be likened to that of Little Big Town, Rascal Flatts and 33Miles. “Hands down, they’re the best new ‘guy group’ in faith-based country-pop,” Christianity Today’s music review said. Baird met Justin Rivers, the lead singer and guitarist, in Austin, Texas. They wanted to use music to “bridge the gap between   a sinful man and a holy God,” Baird said. The group has been together since 2006 and recently enjoyed the spotlight for receiving the 2008 Dove Award for Bluegrass Recorded Song of the Year, “He’s in Control.” They were nominationed for three awards. Rivers said, “We were shocked because they’re so many people who don’t know who we (are).” The threesome, made of worship pastors Rivers, Baird and Toby Hitchcock, have been involved in music in some form since  childhood. “I knew music was the only thing I was going to do,” Rivers said. “I tried to play football in high school, and I tried to pursue other avenues of interest, but none that I liked as well as music. It just consumed me.” Hitchcock’s parents were musicians, so he grew up travelling. “I remember being on the road and being like 4 years old and singing all their songs in the back seat,” Hitchcock said. For Baird, ministry has been his resounding calling. He was a youth pastor before he became a music minister. “In my worship leading area, I was like ‘This is fun, but I don’t want to stand up and conduct music.’ I want to work with a band,” Baird said. “So I started working with bands. That’s where my passion for music developed.” Each member has traveled a long road to get to the place where he is now. Rivers said he got a kid guitar for Christmas when he was 3 years old. He and the six-stringed instrument were inseparable. “I don’t really recall this,” Rivers said, “but (my mom) said that I would carry it around … day and night, like it was my security blanket.” As a child, he entertained church members nearly every Sunday, trying to play along during worship. Rivers said, “People would be on stage singing, and I would be the little kid on fourth...

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Pause for thought: Roommate Woes
Nov04

Pause for thought: Roommate Woes

By Joshua Thiering The door opens, and in walks old bad news herself. It’s that roommate who always gets on your nerves. She plops down on the sofa, groaning, making a point to let everyone know how miserable her life is. Soon the groans will be drowned out by Lauryn Hill, whining over her laptop speakers. “Killing me softly, with his song, killing me softly,” she sings along with the chorus. Ironically, however, it’s really you she is killing softly. Perhaps you have a roommate like this one. Like a badger, their tracks can be spotted a couple of ways. They usually live in your living room and never leave. They only speak to you negatively, and ask you a lot of questions when you’re walking out the door like: “Where you are going? And why do you never make time for me?” With the housing process quickly approaching, switching roommates can be as difficult and terrifying as undertaking surgery. For those thinking about cutting ties, here are a few quick tips to numb the long-term pain of your roommate woes. Avoidance “The only way to get the best of an argument is to avoid it,” said best-selling author Dale Carnegie. The best way to avoid conflicts at your apartment is not to be there. Make a schedule of when your roommate is home. Now take a permanent marker, and black out those blocks, and write over them with red ink: study in library, dinner with friends, long walk around campus or dig a hole to China. Be dirty The dirtier you are, the less likely they will want to live with you. Try eating meals in their bed. Leave your dirty dishes on their night stand. If you ever do have to wash any dishes, do it in the toilet bowl. Once the mess piles up, blame them. Take your friends on guided tours through their messy rooms. Be sure to use metaphorical language comparing the room to a pigsty or a tsunami refugee camp. Redecorate the living room Print up bad photos of your roommate and hang them all over your living room walls. You know the one, with the double chin, and the one black and white photo where they tried to be artsy, but just ended up looking like a whitewashed bloated Jabba The Hut with heartburn. Tack it up. These tactics may make matters worse temporarily, but in the long run, they will not put up a fight to move...

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Pumpkin Patch
Nov04

Pumpkin Patch

Freshman art major Kaylee Wideman (left) and freshman nursing major Nathan Johnson compete in Hardy Hall’s annual pumpkin carving contest. Some of the orange squash featured funny faces, leaves, Luther Memorial and many other tributes to fall.

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Chili joins Saderpuff Reloaded
Nov04

Chili joins Saderpuff Reloaded

The air on the intramural field was filled with the scent of chili powder and leather on Friday, Oct. 24. The sounds of cheering fans and loud noise makers competed with the sounds of campus organizations pawning off their homemade interpretation of the traditional Texas-favorite chili. Loud speakers blared popular songs as students’ attentions warred between a big screen projection of Guitar Hero and classmates’ football battle. The annual Saderpuff football game, in which female students compete for class superiority in a tournament-style flag football game, was hosted this year in conjunction with the Campus Activity Board’s annual chili cook-off. The theme for the event was Saderpuff Reloaded. “I think it’s great,” Director of Student Organizations Kristy Brischke said. “We were hoping that putting the two together would really help out both events. I think it’s really helped a lot. I just love how there are people mingling between the two events and how it has worked together so well so far.” Brischke said she wished more campus organizations had participated  in the chili cook-off. “I’ve been here for three years now,” she said. “It’s always been about this amount of entrants in the cook-off, but I just wish there were more. It really helps get people excited about it. There is going to be interest next year because this was such a success this year.” Sophomore Robert Hawkins was a CAB organizer. “The turnout wasn’t as big this year as it has been in years past, but that’s purely because we did it in conjunction with Saderpuff instead of at the football game. We’re really satisfied with the way things turned out, and the student turn-out has been great,” he said. Hawkins and his team of judges chose the best chili from among four different entrants based on presentation, taste and table décor. The Nursing Student Association’s team, the Bone-Chillers, took home first place, winning a $1,000 prize for their organization. “Some of the entrant’s chili was not as thick as we thought chili should be; it was more like a stew, and the bone-chillers really had a great flavor, presentation and consistency,” Hawkins said. “We feel so great,” Associate Professor of Nursing and primary faculty for N.S.A. Donna Hubbard said. “We got together and we put all of our ingredients together, like nurses do, and we worked as a team and won.” The prize money will go toward paying for the state convention for the N.S.A. “It’s a leadership conference that helps nurses to learn about their profession, be a part of their profession and be good nurses,” Hubbard said. Chili was not the only thing taking...

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