Homecoming 2008 Alumni Activities Calendar
Nov04

Homecoming 2008 Alumni Activities Calendar

November 7 11 a.m.  Homecoming Chapel 12 p.m.  Alumni Lunch 2 p.m.  Campus Tours 6 p.m.  Alumni Dinner 8:30 p.m.  Pep Rally 9:30 p.m.  Dessert Party 10 p.m.  Circle of Songs November 8 8 a.m.  Cru 5K Fun Run 8:30 a.m. Breakfast with the President 10 a.m. Group Reunions, Historical Phila and Royal Academia 12 p.m. Tailgate Party 2 p.m. Football game vs. Howard Payne 7 p.m. Twelve Angry...

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Edgar Allen Poe Party

When: Tuesday, October 28 Time: 6:30 p.m. Where: Amphitheater

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Fall Feast and Pumpkin Carving Contest

When: Wednesday, October 29 Time: 4:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Where: Hardy Hall

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Homecoming Semi-Formal

When: Saturday, November 8, 2008 Time: 9:00 p.m. – 1:00 a.m. Where: Mayborn Gym

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Civil rights, football fuel ‘The Express’
Oct21

Civil rights, football fuel ‘The Express’

The Express is not just a name. It is history. The film is a story of an athlete who overcomes social discrimination and provokes black athletes across the nation to stand out from the crowd. This production is not a football film. It is more than that. Ernie Davis’ story begins in Uniontown, Penn., in a transitional era  when segregation in schools was normal and when civil rights to every American, regardless of race, was added to the Constitution. The young Ernie Davis has a poster of Jackie Robinson, a role model who inspired many black athletes to pursue their dreams and break through social oppression, on his wall. Davis’ grandfather, Pops, is his guardian throughout his childhood who instills in him at a young age that he can do anything and to follow Corinthians 15:10, which says, “But by the grace of God I am what I am: and his grace which was bestowed on me was not in vain; but I labored more abundantly than they all: yet not I, but the grace of God which was with me.” This verse gives Davis’ character a meaning larger than just football. In his high school years, the now older Ernie Davis played by Rob Brown, impresses college scouts, breaking through would-be tacklers and running circles around players, much like his favorite player, Jim Brown, played by Darrin Dewitt Henson. Needless to say, Davis is a beast on the gridiron. The Syracuse head coach, Ben Schwartzwalder, played by Dennis Quaid, recruits Davis to play for the Orangemen. He provides helpful advice and stands up for his players despite his own possible persecution as an “n-word lover.” The movie has more racial slurs than most would appreciate, but it shows how hard it was being a black American during that time. The racially-charged storyline builds into climax when Davis and the Orangemen face off against the University of Texas Longhorns in the Cotton Bowl. The unforgiving fans and brutal players from UT make a victory in Dallas seem impossible. Coach Schwartzwalder says about the national championship, “This is more than a game now. I can see that just as plain as any of you.” The visual appeal in the film is impeccable. Old film clips mixed with fast-paced action makes watching the games extremely pleasing. The cinematography used in the film is by far the best of the fall season. The camera angles are unique. The production makes use of several different techniques, each enhancing the film into a superfluous retelling of Ernie Davis’ story. This inspirational film is a treat in a rather unimpressive fall movie season. The Express...

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Pause for thought: Decision 2008
Oct21

Pause for thought: Decision 2008

By Joshua Thiering Big questions loom as we barrel down the homestretch of 2008. Big questions like: What should I major in? Who should I vote for? Should I get a hair cut? Well, don’t fret my little fretting freshman. I’ve got some answers for you. But they aren’t about silly things  the “main stream media” covers like majors and presidential elections. Instead, like Santa, or the three wisemen (if your feeling preachy), I come bearing gifts to those who care about their hair. These gifts are in the form of a point counter point of the ever important issue of hair cuts. Pro: Hey you, get a haircut. Your head looks like a mangy cat. Call the vet! Haircuts make it look healthy, and you’ll get less dandruff — a win-win situation for everyone. The Bird’s Nest is not just the stadium where the Olympics were held. It’s your head! Shave it, you haggard, kinky-haired Chia Pet. A hair stylist should hijack your hair.  Your hair is an abomination. It ruins your witness. Think about God.  Think biblically. Your mother tells your grandmother it’s time to get the shears.  We will cheer if you shear! “Your hair looks like a bush,” said senior Andrew Dickerson, who is a reliable source of unreliable sources. Cut your hair.  It isn’t famous. It’s infamous. You look like Saddam Hussein when they pulled him out of his hole. You were seen on campus and thought to be Bigfoot. Con: No, don’t shear thy righteous bangs. Thou long, flowing mane doth glow in the sun’s golden rays. Doth the shaved lion roar as loud? Nay, my friend. Your hair is a liberation; let us drink from its cup. The barbers are the truly barbarous. Maybe your hair has gone hay-wire. What is wrong with that? The armed services shave the heads of enlistees to maintain uniformity. They want you to be part of the mass. Be bold. Celebrate your differences. Grow it long and strong. Paint with all the colors of the wind. Or, better yet, think biblically. Delilah is waiting around ever corner, waiting to sap your strength. Take a walk on the wild side. Business in front, party in the back, isn’t merely the mullet. It’s the Missouri Compromise. You look like a mop head, but mops clean things. So what if you look like you stuck your fingers in a light socket? It’s only a testament to your electric personality. Oliver Herford once said, “A hair in the head is worth two in the brush.” Grow it long before it all falls out. Conclusion: As you can tell, by column...

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