Innovative food drive ‘canstructs’ help
Feb21

Innovative food drive ‘canstructs’ help

King Tut made an appearance on campus Feb. 10. Seven teams competed in Belton’s first Canstruction competition benefiting Belton’s Helping Hands Ministry in the Mayborn Campus Center. The teams built their structures out of canned goods in order to help stock the local food pantry in Belton. Sophomore elementary education major Lauren McKee attended the event because of her role as a Helping Hands ministry leader on the Ministry Leadership Council at the Baptist Student Ministry. At the event, McKee helped by collecting money and cans from people who attended. She also helped get the cans to the ministry. McKee thinks the canned food event was amazing. “It was really inspiring to see the people come together to help serve Helping Hands, who serves so many people in the Belton community,” she said. Her favorite structure was one by Belton Middle School. “(They) made a canstruction of the Disney movie Ratatouille. It had 5,000 cans and looked so much like the actual Ratatouille that it won my vote,” McKee said. Each person who attended was given a ticket to put in a container next to each structure. Additional votes could be acquired through additional monetary donations placed in the containers. Senior sport management major Kinzey Joiner said the event sounded great, so he participated by sorting and moving cans. Kinzey believes the event helped recognize the local ministry. “I thought it shed light to the things Helping Hands stands for and the things they have accomplished in outreach.” Director of Christian Life Commission Suzii Paytner was the guest speaker for the Saturday luncheon and the gala that evening.  She spoke on food insecurity and those who live in poverty in Texas. “(Paytner) was amazing and had such a passion for families and people in the state of Texas,”  Kinzey said. He was most impressed with the King Tut construction. The canstruction was made mostly of cans with yellow labels stacked to resemble the great Egyptian’s head. “It was so distinct and used the colors of the labels so well and truly showed what could be accomplished when hard work and planning is put into a nonprofit event,” he said. Teams were made up of students from Belton Middle School, Foundation United Methodist Church (of Belton), the youth ministry of Belton Nazarene Church, the Belton Young Professionals, Architectural Edge of Temple and a group of physician assistants from the Internal and Family Medicine departments of Scott & White Memorial Hospital. Teams were  responsible for providing all cans needed for their structures with a 1,000 can minimum. The university was a silver can sponsor for the event along with Salado Web Hosting and...

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Honors Program to host professor for three-part series
Feb21

Honors Program to host professor for three-part series

Scholar, professor, activist, speaker, author, husband, father, friend – Dr. David Gushee wears many different hats. The distinguished university professor of Christian ethics is the director of the Center for Theology and Public Life at Mercer University in Georgia. Gushee will deliver part one of his three-part lecture series in chapel Wednesday titled “Sanctifying Every Life.”  Sponsored by The Honors Program and the Center for Baptist Studies, Gushee will be discussing the sanctity of human life. “I am talking in three different ways about the ancient and beautiful Christian belief that every human life is infinitely sacred in the sight of God and should be treated accordingly by us,” Gushee said. “I believe this is the most important theological and moral belief in Christianity.” Gushee has written 12 books including Righteous Gentiles of the Holocaust and Religious Faith, Torture, and Our National Soul.  His next book project  will be finished this summer and will explore the theological and ethical conviction that human life is sacred, which is the topic he will be discussing on campus. He was educated at the College of William and Mary, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and Union Theological Seminary in New York, where he earned a Ph.D. in Christian ethics.  He has continued in his vision for his life, offering service through scholarship, teaching and activism in Christian ethics. In addition to the chapel presentations Wednesday at 10 a.m. and 11 a.m.,  Gushee will cover “Sanctifying Life in Early Christianity”  at 3:30 p.m. in Manning Chapel. To conclude his series, Gushee will finish with “Christian Rescuers and the Sanctity of Life” Thursday at 11 a.m. in Manning. “My talks will include an overview of the theme in chapel then a talk on how the early church lived this belief out and finally a discussion of Christians who lived this by rescuing Jews during the Holocaust,” Gushee said. Dr. David Holcomb, associate professor of history and political science and director of the Honors Program, thinks students will enjoy the lectures. Gushee is a “leading evangelical spokesperson on many important ethical issues. He also has the reputation as an engaging and student-friendly speaker,” he said. In 2010, Gushee helped found the New Evangelical Partnership for the Common Good which is just one of the many organizations he is a part of. Other groups include Evangelicals for Human Rights, Climate Change and Peacemaking. The lectures are inspired by Gushee’s publications, especially his most recent project. Holcomb said, “Dr. Gushee’s lectures will draw from his forthcoming book entitled Sanctifying Life. He will challenge the audience to think about the sanctity of life more holistically, rather than trying to boil...

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Typography: ‘bread and butter’ of design
Feb21

Typography: ‘bread and butter’ of design

People rarely pay any attention to fonts or typefaces, but Anthony Watkins, a professor at Sam Houston State University, has a specific passion for typography. Through an acquaintance with Ted Barnes, the dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts at UMHB, Watkins was invited to display a gallery  of his works and  conduct a workshop. Watkins received his Master of Fine Arts from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and has been teaching at SHSU for more than a year and a half. “It was interesting to put together a gallery,” Watkins said. Being a graphic designer, he does not usually gather his work for studio presentations. Senior computer graphic design major Kyla Williams attended the opening of the gallery Feb. 17 and enjoyed seeing Watkins’ designs. “Some were funny and precocious,” she said. “I appreciated hearing how he became a designer.” Freshman nursing major Pat Krone, who saw the display, said, “(The designs) are quite bright and colorful. They definitely catch your eye and make you stop and look closer.” The display shows Watkins’ talent and multiplicity as a designer as well as his personality and humor. The most apparent skill displayed in his work is an inherent understanding of typographic information, as almost all of his designs feature words or letters. The exhibition will be open until March 11 in the Arla Ray Tyson Art Gallery on the second floor of Townsend Memorial Library. Of all the subjects dealt with in design, one of Watkins’ favorites is typography, which he refers to as the “bread and butter” of design. “Typography is very foundational (and) tremendously important to be able to work successfully as a designer …. A lot of good designers could do 90% of their work with seven or eight good typefaces,” Watkins said. His favorite fonts are those that are “classic, time tested…(and) have been around for hundreds of years.” However, Watkins said that “doesn’t make them old. They’re as useful and as contemporary as they were 300 years ago.” Because of his passion for typography, Watkins’ workshop focused on fonts and    typefaces. It took place the Friday following the opening of the gallery in Presser Hall, and students who were interested in the workshop were instructed to bring an exacto-knife. After a brief highlight of the delicate differences between typefaces, Watkins explained the project he hoped to complete during the workshop, and over the next three hours, several students dropped in and out of the workshop to lend a hand. The ingredients involved in Watkins’ design recipe included 6×6-and-6×8 inch foam poster board, many different colors of printer paper, cans of adhesive spray...

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Crusaders join schools at annual conference, gain new knowledge for leadership roles
Feb08

Crusaders join schools at annual conference, gain new knowledge for leadership roles

On Jan. 27, upwards of 30 UMHB students piled into the university’s vans and drove four hours to East Texas Baptist University in Marshall. ETBU was host for this year’s Christian Association of Student Leaders Conference. CASL was formulated and started by UMHB’s very own Dr. George Loutherback 13 years ago, and since then the conference has expanded to serve almost every major Baptist university in Texas. Each year in January students from schools such as Howard Payne, Hardin-Simmons, Dallas Baptist, Houston Baptist, East Texas Baptist, and UMHB come together to study leadership. Last year the conference was held on Houston Baptist’s campus, and next year the conference will travel to Dallas Baptist University. UMHB hosted the conference in 2008. Senior history major Jennifer “J” Larkin has attended CASL for the past four years, attending two years as a Ministry Leadership Council (MLC) leader as well as another two as a member of Campus Activities Board. Larkin said “CASL has impacted the way that I view leadership and taught me that I can love people in being a leader.” At CASL, leaders from each university’s Campus Activities Boards, Baptist Student Ministries, Student Government Associations, Residence Life, Welcome Week committees and recreational staff gather. Sophomore exercise sports science major Aaron Miller said, “Having the opportunity to understand how each individual leader functions on their campus helped me form new ideas on how to lead events and programs on our campus.” Miller serves on the Ministry Leadership Council as an internationals leader and is also a co-director of Missions Emphasis Week 2011. The conference program included three major speakers and four round table discussion group times, the last three immediately following a speaker. This year’s speakers included a pastor, Gene Wilkes; an educator, Sherilyn Emberton; and a politician, Bryan Hughes. This aray of speakers reflects the many different leadership groups attending the conference: leaders in ministry, campus activities and student government. The three speakers touched on valuable leadership topics such as servant leadership, adaptation, personal and spiritual care and generational differences in leadership roles. Freshman math major Ryan Frusha attended the conference through the Freshmen Ministries group at the BSM. He said he was “personally challenged to look at (his) life and see if it measures up to God’s standard for a man of God.” The round table groups provided leaders with a chance to meet students from other similar universities and build relationships with them, while constructively discussing the  strengths and weaknesses of each campus. Larkin expressed that, through the round tables, “CASL has been a place for me to come meet other people who, understanding the question, we all...

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Students dance for Dr. Dre’s
Feb08

Students dance for Dr. Dre’s

With an incentive like a five dollar gift card just for participating, it’s no wonder students jumped on it. The Campus Activities board held a Kinect dance competition Jan. 26 in the SUB  where 40 students competed and more than  200 came to watch. Along with a gift card, anyone who signed up also was entered for the grand prize — a pair of Beats by Dr. Dre headphones. Assistant Director of Campus Activities Jeff Sutton was happy with the event. “The idea came from a brainstorming session at our first CAB meeting of the semester. I challenged the students to plan an event and implement it in the next two days …. Everyone really seemed to enjoy it,” he said. The CAB workers advertised the event throughout campus and over Facebook. Freshman Christian studies major Mary Parrish was one of the students who discovered the contest through Facebook. “At first I was kind of hesitant to participate because I’ve never played. But, I’m also a very competitive person, so I thought why not,” she said. Parrish said she didn’t do as well as she wanted but still had fun. “The best part was watching the other students dance. Seeing my friends go head to head while trying to keep up with the beat was a good laugh well needed,” she said. Junior computer science major Ryan Metcalf saw the bulletin board in the SUB announcing the event and was eager to participate. Metcalf said he did well in the competition. “For the final round, I was shocked and nervous dancing to Lady Gaga’s ‘Just Dance’ on the hardest level, but I just went with the groove and took it to a new level for the win,” he said. Metcalf outlasted all the other competitors in the tournament and won the pair of Dr. Dre headphones. “I love dancing and acting goofy,” he said. Sophomore accounting major Audrey Ohendalski was part of putting on the event through her role in the public relations section of CAB. During the event Ohendalski was happy with the turnout. “It’s been majorly entertaining, and it’s like a huge hit. There are like at least 50 people right now and more are coming in after chapel,” she said. Ohendalski thinks the addition of the Kinect to the SUB brings something new for students, especially because they don’t need controllers. She said, “It gets people up and moving …gets you watching, and then you’re like oh I want to try...

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Super Bowl XLV: not just about football

Scantily clad women, ice cold beer, over-endorsed celebrities and expensive cars – that is what the Super Bowl is about. Sure, avid football fans will remember that the Green Bay Packers are the Super Bowl XLV Champions, but for the other 110 million viewers who tuned in, it was all about the commercials. Thanks to the Internet and mainly YouTube, ad addicts can instantly vote for their favorite commercial and upload it to their Facebook pages, in case their friends missed the 30 seconds that forever changed their life.  With more than 13 million views on YouTube alone, Volkswagen’s Darth Vader kid just may have clinched its title as Super Bowl XLV Commercial Champion. Volkswagen was not the only Automaker pushing its product. After two tough years for the motor industry, Chevrolet, Chrysler, Hyundai, Kia, Suzki, Mini, BMW, Audi and Mercedes-Benz paid high dollar for air time during advertising’s biggest showcase. Chrysler pushed the limits of how long a Super Bowl ad could be with a two-minute and four second commercial paying an ode to Detroit featuring rapper Eminem. Chevrolet surprised viewers when a seemingly boring car dealership ad is disrupted by a Camaro morphing into the Bumblebee character from the Transformer movies. Overall, celebrities and humor dominated the 60 Super Bowl commercials this year. Roseanne Barr gets knocked out by a log in a continuing ad campaign by Snickers, “You’re not you when you’re hungry.” Kim Kardashian steams things up a bit by breaking up with her irresistible trainer for Skecher Shape-Ups. Joan Rivers and Danica Patrick each make a sexy appearance to market the new domain name GoDaddy.com, and Eminem made an animated appearance in a humorous Brisk tea commercial. With all the hype about Best Buy’s commercial, Ozzy Osbourne and Justin Bieber disappoint with their not-so-funny bit about keeping up with technology. The Fast-growing Internet firm, Groupon Inc., stirred immediate controversy on Twitter for an ad depicting Tibet as a people group who are in trouble, but still make an amazing fish curry. CareerBuilder’s chimpanzees and E*Trade’s talking baby campaigns also seemed to garner few laughs and had an over-used feel about them. Doritos and PepsiMax ran an ad campaign for which people could submit commercial ideas to crashthesuperbowl.com and three finalists would be chosen. Out of more than 5,000 submissions, Doritos: Pug, Doritos: House Sitting and Doritos: The Best Part received 30 seconds, significant sums of cash and the chance to create future commercials for the company. Since technology is constantly changing, the price of commercials is significantly increasing. For the first televised Super Bowl in 1967 sponsors shelled out $40,000 per spot. This year...

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