Dates on a Budget
Feb09

Dates on a Budget

Showing your significant other how much they mean to you doesn’t mean you have to spend a lot of money on them. There are plenty of ways to spend quality time together and create new memories, all on a budget. Picnicking – Pack food that both of you enjoy, find a spot in nature, and enjoy the scenery as you eat and talk to your hearts content. Nolan Creek has plenty of spots available for a romantic picnic. Go to the movies – An inexpensive place to go see a movie is at The Beltonian Theatre. Tickets are $3.99 a person plus tax. Also, at the Beltonian, you can even use CruCash. Have a game night – This could mean solving a puzzle together, playing card and board games, or playing a video game. Friendly competition and problem solving is a great way to spend time with your beloved. Get some coffee – One great place that is perfect to wind down and really get to talk to your significant other is at a coffee shop. Arusha’s Coffee and Tea is a great place to grab a cup of joe. Often, the coffee shop has musicians that perform inside, making coffee and music a wonderful opportunity to have meaningful conversations. Watch a show – Have you still not finished that season of Longmire? Or how about The Office? Staying home and binge watching a show is a fun way to pass the time with your boyfriend or girlfriend. Go antiquing – One of the best parts about Belton is that it is a hub for antique shops. Why not walk around downtown Belton and go antiquing with your significant other? Both of you will be sure to have fun, find interesting items, and create unique...

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A Fatal Flop: The Maze Runner movie review
Feb09

A Fatal Flop: The Maze Runner movie review

When the Maze Runner series was first made into a movie in 2014, fans like myself were excited to see how the story would play out onscreen. However, after seeing the final instalment of the films, I am left disappointed and disgruntled. In rating the Maze Runner: The Death Cure, I would give it four of ten stars. Maze runner: The Death Cure is the final movie in the series and had been anticipated for a long time by fans. After main actor Dylan O’Brien (Thomas) was injured during filming, the production was stopped temporarily until he fully recovered. Now after three years since The Scorch Trials was released in 2015, fans get a final look into the world of The Maze Runner. The Death Cure’s plot is described as saving their friends by breaking into the legendary last city, a city controlled by the villain organization, “WCKD.” It is stated in the description that anyone who makes it out alive will get the answers to the questions the “Gladers” have been asking since they first arrived in the original maze (in the first two movies). Though the movie did answer many questions that popped up in the earlier movies and it was supposed to provide closure to viewers, I was left with a lot of questions and criticisms by the end of the film. The movie was longer than I expected: around two hours and thirty minutes. Granted, the filmmakers tried to stuff the last two books from the series into this movie. That’s right, two books, one movie. I felt I was missing a lot of what was going on and was barely able to keep up with what was happening and why. The movie follows a fairly steady plot line, however, there were a few things that happened that weren’t explained well enough. In my personal opinion, taking a break from production effected the acting from the rest of the characters. The acting and stunts were mediocre but could have been cool if improved upon. There were some stunts where I saw that the stunt people did the motion before the timed event. For instance, there was a stunt person jumping something like thirty seconds before an explosion; and another where two guards turned around late when a glass door behind them had already opened so they could stop the fight happening inside. One character that was over dramatized was the assistant head villain Janson (played by Aidan Gillen). I felt that he could have performed his role better. They used his character to be more “jump scare” (a film technique used to startle the audience)...

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Cru Love: UMHB’s Vice President – alumni turned love story
Feb09

Cru Love: UMHB’s Vice President – alumni turned love story

When asked what he loved most about his wife, Dr. Steve Theodore, Vice President of the university, had many endearing words: “Grace’s commitment to Christ….she’s dedicated to serving our family and others…. she is practical and not materialistic.” Steve and his wife Grace Theodore are both alumni of UMHB, and together, create a beautiful type of love. In the spring of 1985, Dr. Theodore helped start Young Life in Belton. Working as the Belton Leader for Young Life, Dr.Theodore received help from the Temple leader and his assistant for music- Grace. “Steve doesn’t remember meeting me,” laughed Grace, remembering their first encounter. “We initially met at a Young Life meeting in Belton. Along with others, Steve was helping start Young Life in Belton and I was helping with the music. We met again in the summer of ‘86 at Immanuel Baptist in Temple where Steve was interning for Dr. Byron Weathersbee, the youth minister.” “Byron asked Grace to help with a kids’ camp in the gym,” said Steve. “I was helping lead the camp. When Grace worked with me at the Immanuel Baptist kids’ camp, she was a sophomore at Baylor.” After dating for a year and growing together as a couple, Grace made the bold decision to transfer to UMHB. “I decided to transfer to UMHB to pursue my education degree and be closer to Steve,” admitted Grace. “We had a lot of fun with Steve’s friends on campus.” The couple continued to grow and fall in love, but after 2 and a half years, called it quits. “I grew in love with Steve throughout our 2 1/2 years of dating,” Grace said. “During a brief break up, I realized I didn’t want to live without him.” When asked what she loved most about her husband, Grace had much to say: “His love for and interaction with our kids, integrity, commitment to our marriage, [his] fun-loving [nature] and good sense of humor.“ “There wasn’t a singular moment,” Steve said when asked when he knew he loved his wife. “We grew together over time. We have learned that marriage is a give-and-take relationship and we’ve learned to compromise. It’s important to find middle ground on issues like money management and parenting styles,” Steve said. “Having a marriage based on Christian principles has given us a strong foundation for all aspects of marriage.” Having been married for many years now, the pair have grown as both leaders in their community as well as with their family. “We raised our children, Lauren and Luke, in a loving, Christian home,” Grace said. “And me, I taught elementary and preschool children for 21...

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“Full Circle” art exhibit features work of Dr. Wynona Alexander
Jan26

“Full Circle” art exhibit features work of Dr. Wynona Alexander

The University of Mary Hardin-Baylor Art Department is featuring a gallery of works by artist and professor Dr. Wynona Alexander, an influential artist from Central Texas. Alexander was a member of the UMHB art faculty from 1968-1969, prior to chairing the Central Texas Fine Arts College from 1969 until her retirement in 2010. She is currently serving as an adjunct professor at Central Texas College. Alexander’s exhibit, “Full Circle: Wynona Alexander, A Retrospective,” features 44 unique pieces of jewelry and assemblages. The pieces of art span over 30 years, with the oldest work of art created in 1984. The most recent piece was created just last year. Even though the art spans a great time length, there is a distinct continuity between her oldest and most recent art. Many of her pieces are created with antique items that have been repurposed to create new forms of art. Alexander’s techniques give old items a new life as something beautiful and out of the ordinary. Her jewelry pieces pack a lot of beauty into a small form with the assemblages that take items that would normally never be considered as complimentary pieces. She incorporates different items, such as pieces of a doll and a ruler to create a piece of artwork. Alexander’s display can be seen Monday through Friday from 9am to 4pm in the gallery at the Baugh Center for the Visual Arts (room 106). Her display has been open since January 8 and will remain open until February 9, 2018. For those who have enjoyed Alexander’s gallery, there will be another exhibit in Baugh Center for the Visual Arts from February 19, 2018 until March 16, 2018. This will be a traveling exhibit called “Through the Iris,” involving the work of 25 female artists. The show, “Through the Iris,” features many different types of art in several...

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Movies, popcorn, and winter chill: Review of The Greatest Showman
Jan26

Movies, popcorn, and winter chill: Review of The Greatest Showman

The Greatest Showman is enamoring audiences at the box office with its flashy costumes, catchy soundtrack, and star-studded cast. Hugh Jackman traded in his wolverine claws for a ring master’s costume and an impressive singing voice to portray the historical figure, Phineas Taylor Barnum, who is best known for founding the Barnum and Bailey Circus with James Anthony Bailey in 1881. The beginning of the film resembles the opening of Queen’s hit, “We Will Rock You,” as Barnum, dressed in his glitzy ringmaster’s costume, sings about “The Greatest Show” as the audience stomps their feet and claps. Then, the film flashes back to the 1820s when Barnum (Ellis Robin) is a kid who travels with his tailor father to rich people’s houses. It’s on one of these trips where he meets Charity Halletts (Skylar Dunn). The two children begin spending time together, unbeknownst by her father (Frederic Lehne). This prompts the duet, “A Million Dreams,” where the audiences watch the young children grow up into adults. This song also establishes their love for each other. Barnum wins Charity’s (Michelle Williams) hand, but her father warns her that she’ll come back once she’s tired of living in poverty. Barnum scrapes together a living for his wife and two daughters by working at a shipping office until the company goes bankrupt. He then gets a loan from the bank to buy a wax museum. After the wax museum fails, he decides to get together oddities from all over the city. He recruits the dwarf Tom Thumb (Sam Humphrey), the Bearded Lady Lettie Lutz (Keala Settle), plus others to be a part of his circus. Barnum then hires the rich playboy Phillip Caryle (Zac Efron) to help him establish credibility among the rich, established families. Meanwhile, Caryle quickly falls in love with the African American trapeze artist Anne Wheeler (Zendaya). The rest of the film follows Barnum as he struggles to make his circus prosperous, then once it does, how the wealth and power begins to consume him and affect his marriage. Jackman has just the right charm and charisma to play P.T. Barnum, plus he can sing and dance. Efron and Zendaya have instant chemistry, which is clearly seen in their duet “Rewrite the Stars.” Benj Pasek and Justin Paul are the masterminds behind the songs in Showman. It’s no wonder the soundtrack has been No. 1 for two weeks in a row. They’re inspiring. The film anthem, “This is Me,” sung by Tony award winner Settle, won Best Original Song at the Golden Globes. “This is Me” becomes the circus performers’ anthem as they long for acceptance. Some critics are...

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Confessions of X: the captivating new romance novel
Jan26

Confessions of X: the captivating new romance novel

The UMHB bookstore started selling Suzanne Wolfe’s novel the Confessions of X at the beginning of the spring semester and it was chosen as the book for discussion in the English Honor Societies book club, so I decided I would join in on the fun. The Confessions of X is a mix of historical fiction, Christian fiction and romance, and is an imaginative correspondent to Saint Augustine’s Confessions. The book follows the life of X, the daughter of a tile-layer and mysterious lover of Saint Augustine of Hippo. The novel paints a perfect picture of the ancient culture and is well researched despite it being historical fiction. Though we know X existed, we only know of who she was through Augustine’s Confessions and I think that Wolfe did a wonderful job keeping X vague enough to give her anonymity while still being personal enough for readers to relate with. The novel is described as “a reflection of what it means to love and lose… while deftly exploring one woman’s search for identity and happiness within very limited circumstances.” The book starts with X in her old age and we learn a lot about her life without giving too much away, but enough to leave you wanting more. In the second chapter, we start with the very beginning of her life and obtain background information, family, and beliefs before we go into the main storyline with Augustine. Readers watch X grow into a young woman, meet Augustine and start a family with him as his lover. Because of the difference in social classes, they can never marry, but knowing this, they both decide to love each other anyway. Now typically, I’m not a romantic, but I found myself rooting for a relationship I knew was bound to end but because of the way it was written, I couldn’t help myself. It was sweet to watch them fall in love and the adorable notions they made after they decided to be together. This book portrays a rare TRUE LOVE not often seen during this time period. The whole book is worded elegantly and the first few chapters need to be read slowly for the reader to fully comprehend the meaning behind the words, but after you start reading, you become more used to the style and it flows more freely off the tongue. I had a limited amount of knowledge concerning Augustine and his confessions, but I was still able to understand everything about him, their life, and the story. I enjoyed this book and would give it a 6 out of 10 at first glance, simply because I knew I...

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