Professor turns class into campus film fest
Feb04

Professor turns class into campus film fest

The theater lights dim and Charlie Chaplin’s iconic character appears on the screen, complete with his cane, bowler hat and unmistakable moustache. His slapstick antics have the audience’s attention as they watch to see how he’s going to get out of a sticky situation. No, this isn’t a flashback to a 1920s movie theater, but rather a scene from Brindley Auditorium as part of a semester-long film series put on by the communication and media studies department.   The series was born from a class, Film History and Criticism, in which students view and discuss iconic films. The professor who teaches the course, Dr. Joseph Tabarlet, has opened his class to the public so that others can view the historic films that are seldom shown in theater-like settings.   Tabarlet belonged to the Central Texas Film Society, which hosted a similar series.   “We did that for a little over two years at the CAC in Temple. It was a lot of fun. I got to see films that I had never seen before and I was able to introduce people to films that I loved that they had never seen before,” he said.   He wanted to bring something similar to UMHB and saw that his Film History and Criticism class would be the perfect opportunity to do so. Films are shown every Monday at 2 p.m. in York 102. Each film in the series either has an important historical significance or has had a lasting impact on the film industry itself.   The first few weeks focus on the early stages of the motion picture industry.   “In this series, we’re seeing a lot of silent films, and the reason for that is that’s such an important part of film history,” Tabarlet said. “You can’t understand how the film industry developed unless you see those films made before 1930 that in many cases are ignored.”   Modern moviegoers may not think silent era films are appealing, but senior general studies major Robert Edwards said they’re more entertaining than one might think.   “I don’t think I ever watched too many silent films, but now that I have, me and my wife watch them together for entertainment,” Edwards said.   Tabarlet said those who avoid silent films are avoiding a major part of cinematic history.   “If they don’t see the silent films because they’re silent, then they’re missing out on a lot. Silent film is an art form ….,” he said.   Even though most people think comedy when thinking of silent films, Tabarlet said they can have a powerful impact as well.   “I remember the...

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Student leaders look ahead,  seek guidance for future
Feb04

Student leaders look ahead, seek guidance for future

The weekend before last, students packed luggage into a trailer and filled several university vans and embarked on a three-and-a-half-hour journey to Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene. Hardin-Simmons was this year’s host school for the annual Christian Association of Student Leaders conference. UMHB attendees represented almost every organization on campus including the likes of Student Government Association, Baptist Student Ministries, Campus Activities Board Welcome Week Steering Committee and Residence Life Association.   Junior psychology major Ross Jones went to the convention with members of First Year Council, also known as FYC. This was his third time to participate.   “My favorite part of CASL is getting to connect with students from other universities and sharing ideas. This year in particular really helped me step into the shoes of a first-year student and take into mind the stress level that they are experiencing and how to work with that not to overwhelm them more,” he said.   Not only did he meet and learn from students at other universities, but the experience made him grateful and gave him a new respect for his own school.   Overall, something I always end up taking away from CASL is perspective and the realization that we are truly blessed here at UMHB in a variety of ways and a lot of the time we tend to take it for granted.   Senior international business major and Student Body President Jonathan Kendall was among the representatives from SGA.   One lesson he took away from the event was how “to better prepare senators for SGA and to communicate the work that is happening within SGA.”   Maegan Loya, a senior education major and executive member of Campus Activities Board, enjoyed herself, but was sad this would be her last year to attend. What made this year special for her was being asked to make a presentation to all of the universities’ Campus Activities Boards about events she and her team have helped plan and execute at UMHB.   “It was great because it’s something I know, love and could talk about with ease. After submitting my presentation among every other school, I was honored to be one of two selected to present at CASL for Student Activities,” she said.   Another highlight of the event for Loya was the second night, which featured a concert by Christian songwriter and recording artist Jimmy Needham.   She said, “I absolutely loved it! I had never seen him live … which made me even more excited to see...

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Artist gives sight to listeners
Jan22

Artist gives sight to listeners

 The Baugh Center for the Visual Arts is hosting works of art from graphic designer Carlos Hernandez.   On Thursday, Jan. 15, Hernandez came to talk to students about his displayed art and how he came into the profession he is in now.   He began the evening with a story about what influenced him to pursue the field of graphic design.   When Hernandez was 7, he found an album at the grocery store.   He held up the album.   “I see this album and I just think this is a cool band. I don’t know who they are, I don’t know anything about it, but I know I like the album cover… and because I liked the cover, I bought the album and brought it home,” Hernandez said.   After taking it home and showing his mom, his mom explained to him that the cover was an illustration that someone was paid to create for the band.   He was so amazed by the artwork and the fact that people did that for a living that he decided he wanted to do that as well.   Hernandez grew up in Lubbock. He now resides in Houston after graduating from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s in graphic design and illustration.   He credits much of his success to living in a small town and not being exposed to as much growing up because it made him want to see more of the world.   Now, his work has been featured in several different publications and he has also designed gig posters for many artists that include Kings of Leon, The Kills, Santana and more. He also designed the poster art for the 2013 Austin City Limits Music Festival.   He is a founding partner of Burning Bones Press, a printmaking studio.   During the gallery talk, he mentioned the process of screen printing, a form of graphic design that Hernandez frequently uses.   “During the… Great Depression… the United States got involved with art. That’s the only time in history the government got involved with art and paid artists to do art. It was called the… Works Progress Administration.”   The WPA put people back to work by training artists and amateurs to create poster art for the government.   The show that is featured in Baugh is primarily gig posters made the same way that the WPA made their posters when they trained men and women.   “Some of the posters are… out there,” Hernandez said about his work and some examples of other students’ works.   He did a lot of monochronmatic jobs in...

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Crusaders traverse globe for missions, academics
Jan22

Crusaders traverse globe for missions, academics

While many students spent most of their breaks relaxing at home and binge-watching Netflix, some students decided to use their time to serve on mission trips and study abroad during the Christmas holiday.   Senior Christian studies major Hannah Bolin took courses in Israel over the break. The trip was 10 days long and covered six hours of courses needed for her major.   “We explored the Holy Land sites. We visited all throughout the land where Abraham’s descendants, the 12 tribes lived,” Bolin said.   The group that went on the trip had to wake up at 8 a.m. to visit four sites every day. These excursions delved deeply into the material covered in the upper level courses of Old and New Testament while also providing the students who went on the trip with a richer understanding of the stories contained in the Bible.   “I want to become a mission’s director or a mobilizer for missionaries in the future,” Bolin said. “This trip really made scripture come to life for me and I can’t wait to share that with others in the future.”   While the trip was a smooth success for the students, there were many preparations that to place during the planning that began long before the trip.   They had to attend prep meetings, which occurred weekly. These gatherings ensured that everything was ready to go and covered a lot of what the students were going to be experiencing during their time abroad.   They also had to discuss travel safety and the research project that would also occur throughout the trip while they were learning.   Each student kept a travel journal during the 10 days and went over their itinerary to stay on track.   “This trip really put the Bible into color for me,” Bolin said “Walking in the land where Jesus walked really was beautiful. We read scripture at every site, and we could really see the Bible come to life at that time.”   While there were several groups that studied abroad, there were also students who went to different countries and served on mission trips.   Senior Christian studies major Leah White went to India over the break with three other students and her sister. With no major commitments holding her back and with the help of her church, friends and family, her decision to spend two weeks in India was easy.   “The decision to travel to India over Christmas started off as a whim of love and turned into an exciting adventure. As I was growing spiritually in the beginning of last semester, the Lord touched...

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Cru Culture
Nov25

Cru Culture

He’s coming toward you, smiling. As he begins to close the distance between the two of you, you have a decision to make. Handshake? Hug? Side-arm?   It’s the pivotal moment of your relationship — the first contact that will determine the course of your life with this other person.   You’ve probably been in more than one awkward handshake encounter, thanks to the fumbling or even sweating of a hand during that first introduction. It’s a predicament we’ve all been in, and one that can either make a friend for life or send the other person running for someone a little more normal.   Handshakes. They’re professional, friendly, sentimental or just plain awkward. Try to avoid the latter.   The Bro   First, there’s the uncertain bro shake. You go in for a simple handshake, thinking this relationship should start out professionally. You clasp hands with the other person, only to be thrown off when he releases his grip and adds a fist pump to your limp fingers. But wait, it’s not over. Now that his fist is smashed against your still outstretched hand, he goes in for the bro hug. Not the bro hug, anything but the bro hug. He then pulls you in, wraps an arm around your back and pats you like he’s burping a baby.   No. Just no.   The Clinger   Then, there’s the control freak. She comes in for the shake, grasping your hand firmly. And while you stare into each other’s eyes and force a smile, her grip hasn’t changed. She’s still shaking. So, you feel as though you need to start some conversation before slipping from her clutch.   “How are you?” Still shaking.   “Good.” Still no release.   Just keep smiling, it will be over, preferably sooner than later.   The Princess   There’s also the dainty shaker. As you approach, she seems pleasant enough. When you reach for her hand, she allows you to grasp it. But it goes completely lifeless like a noodle. You can’t shake hands with a noodle.   So as her grip remains limp, it looks as though you’ve taken her hand to plant a gentle kiss on it, like a princess. That might not be appropriate, depending on your social situation, so you’re forced to let go and allow her arm to fall back by her side.   To avoid an extremely awkward encounter, I would suggest going in for a hug. Then again, there’s a whole lot of mishaps in hugging as well, but we will save that for another day.   Shake it off,...

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Nick Jonas breaks “Chains” of Disney
Nov25

Nick Jonas breaks “Chains” of Disney

Toto, I have a feeling we aren’t in Disney anymore.   Breaking away from his former Disney image and a little more than a year after his band of brothers split up, Nick Jonas has finally stepped out with some new music.   His self-titled album is almost unrecognizable, showcasing some rap, R&B and soul, but continuing with the pop music his fans have always known and loved.   The 22-year-old solo artist told Rolling Stone in a recent interview that his plan is to “surprise the world with the unexpected.”   He did just that.   Jonas quickly sheds his “good boy role,” which is apparent in some of his songs that use explicit language. This may not sit well with Jonas’ long-time fans, who may not appreciate the artist’s change in style.   Before the album’s release on Nov. 11, Nick’s first single, titled “Jealous,” was played on the radio and has been in the Billboard’s Top 40 for a couple of weeks now.   The album made it to streaming services like Spotify, even before the debut, showcasing songs like “Numb,” which features the upcoming female rapper, Angel Haze.   Surprisingly, his songs have also become popular, with “Chains” having more than one million “clicks,” showing how many times it has been listened to. “Numb” is right behind, with just under a million.   Jonas also proved he’s more than good-boy-gone-bad with the questionable lyrics from his other songs.   “Warning,” “Avalanche” with Demi Lovato and “Closer” featuring Mike Posner — these are just a few of the songs that have a lot of meaning that people can relate to.   It’s pretty obvious Nick will be bringing plenty of fans from his Jonas Brother’s days, but it’s unsure if they will stay after hearing what he has to say through song.   “I’m trying to make bold moves,” Jonas told People. “If not everyone comes on that journey with me, that’s okay. Now I get to do what I want and say what I want, and that freedom feels amazing.”   Following this statement, a lyric video for his new single “Teacher” was released, and it is racier than the words that the song incorporates.   The video displays male and female models dancing provocatively with the lyrics from the song written on different parts of their body.   Scandalous.   This had fans questioning his past motives of being a good Christian guy with a purity ring, and how he could turn his image to a man singing lustful lyrics while posing in underwear.   His controversial photo spread featured jeans, a tight tank...

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