Phi Alpha shines light on domestic violence through coffee house event
Oct25

Phi Alpha shines light on domestic violence through coffee house event

Coffee, good music and laughs were in abundance as people gathered in McLane Great Hall to support those who have been affected by domestic violence Tuesday, Oct. 14. October is national domestic violence awareness month so Delta Epsilon Phi Alpha (Phi Alpha) teamed up with Teach Them to Love (T3L) in Killeen to spread awareness. Phi Alpha President Taylor Ballou gave a speech explaining Phi Alpha and what the honors society was all about. Senior Officer Maya Wiemokly explained what exactly T3L was as an organization and the kind of work they were doing for those in need. Briana Frederickson, Miss MHB 2017/18 and recent graduate gave a short yet powerful speech about domestic violence and was keen to share her story. “My sophomore year I was in a relationship that turned abusive,” Frederickson said. She was “…assaulted by someone I did not know, and after that had happened I tried to commit suicide, and all of this happened within a span of five months. So, I had hit rock bottom, pretty much,” she said. “Had” was the keyword, as she realized over the course of her time at UMHB what her purpose was, when she was suggested for the Miss MHB pageant by one of her professors during her senior year. “Miss MHB is supposed to be this picture of grace, virtue,” Frederickson said. “And I thought there is no way I can do that.” As a guest singer for the event, Frederickson was obviously talented in singing. She used it as her special talent in the pageant. “I knew I wanted to sing, but I didn’t know what I wanted to sing. So I asked [the judges] if they could listen to my song I wrote and see if it was an option. When I played it they said, ‘you have to play it!’” The song in question has no title. In fact, the title is whatever each person thinks it is. But, personally, an appropriate title could have been ‘Uphill Battle.’ “Everybody has a story and some people might hear my story [specifically] and think that my story isn’t filled with as much heartache, or even more heartache,” Frederickson said. “Wherever people are, they can find something to relate to in the song and get the message that it might be hard to keep going… whether they gave up, or kept going, I wanted this song to be for them.” After a fantastic, tear-inducing performance by Frederickson, everyone broke off into smaller groups and chatted the night away. As the coffee ran out and the music stopped, people started to head home. After hearing the sobering,...

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Local artists Illuminated
Sep27

Local artists Illuminated

Illuminate held its second event here on campus, Friday, Sept. 27. Illuminate is labeled as a “positive vibes only” event that highlights the talents of various students and Belton locals with performances in Christian rap, singing, dancing and poetry. The event was founded by UMHB Alums Michael Carpenter and Alish Burden, along with sophomore Jan Carlo Rodriguez. It took only 3 months for the determined students to get their idea off the ground, which created major buzz within the UMHB and Belton community. “We feel like there is a gap in cultural events on campus,” Carpenter said. “There is a group of students whom we call ‘cultural minorities.’ They aren’t a specific race, gender or ethnicity, but they are cultured in a way that’s different than the majority of UMHB students, so a lot of times they fall through the cracks…we want to help fill that gap.” “These students appreciate a wide variety of music, fashion, humor, etc. than is normally promoted on campus,” Carpenter added. Illuminate was held at the Parker Academic Center in partnership with the CRU Bridge student organization. The scene for the event was decked out with lights, cameras and eager students ready to support their fellow classmates throughout the night. “I find it important for it to be hosted near or on campus, because there is a lot of talent in our backyard. A lot of dope artists and creators, but they have no platform for their voice,” junior marketing major Kalen Chatman, a previous Illuminate performer, said. “Illuminate allows UMHB to empower those artists and give them a platform,” Chatman said. Each performer had a lengthy amount of time to express themselves and show off their talents. The audience was filled with laughter and dance moves.  The room was packed with so much diversity. To learn more about Illuminate and their upcoming events follow their Instagram handle...

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ONE worship builds community
Sep25

ONE worship builds community

Students prayed and sang side by side together at the ONE interdenominational worship gathering in Walton Chapel on Wednesday, Sept. 25. It was an opportunity for a plethora of different churches from around the Bell County area to come together, which they do twice a semester. The evening started off with songs of worship led by the Temple Bible Church band.  Then the crowd was welcomed by two college pastors from local churches: Evan Duncan, the teaching and communications pastor at First Baptist Temple Church, and Shannon Soard, the college pastor at Temple Bible Church. Duncan’s message to the students in attendance of the event was that there is no exchange for faith or community provided by the church. His message was based out of the book of Acts 2:41-47. Duncan said that while we like to substitute some things in life, there is no substitute for our faith. “There is no substitute for the local church,” Duncan said. He encouraged the students to maintain their faith and to find a church to get involved with and plugged into. “It is not what you get out of it, but what you can bring to it,” Duncan said. He encouraged students to break their boundaries in order to find a church home. “Church community crosses boundaries,” Duncan said. ONE concluded with everyone reading the Nicene Creed, led by Shannon Soard. The atmosphere was reverent, engaged and worshipful. “It was a good experience to let go of my anxiety and give it to the Lord,” said Rynda Maddox, a freshman nursing major. “It was amazing to see so many college students worshipping together,” Liles said. “I thought it was an event that every freshman needed to hear…it was all about UMHB community…and was encouraging [students] to break boundaries,” senior physical therapy major Ellie Phelps said. For more information, contact Daniel McAfee, director of the Baptist Student Ministry, at...

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FYC hosts “Back to the Formal”
Apr24

FYC hosts “Back to the Formal”

Multicolored lights, disco balls and a vintage photo booth were just a few characteristics featured at the “Back to the Future” themed formal held in Temple’s Main Street Hall on Saturday evening, April 6. The formal was raised two stories high and was decked out with an array of decorations that acknowledged the different decades of the past, present and future. First Year Collective hosts this annual event. FYC is a campus organization that provides a place of fellowship for first year students through leadership, community service, spiritual growth and school spirit. The formal has a different creative theme every year, and this year topped the rest with its expressive theme that shows off how unique our students can really get. Each student came out dressed to impress in outfits that represented different decades and their most popular fashion statements, some styled in tutu skirts and neon leggings to represent the 80s and others in bell bottom jeans and flower crowns to bring a bit of the 70s into the mix. The disco ball lit the floor as students danced the night away with their peers. The area was filled with crowd surfing, eating and tons of laughter, and the vintage photo booth captured the memories of friends and their blast to the past. “This was my last year to attend (Formal), so I really wanted to go and experience my last formal… I really liked the photo booth that they had this year,” said Jimmy Boutte, a senior education major. “I also liked the ‘Back to the Future’ theme. They even had old movies playing on the projector, which was really cool,” Boutte said. Formal was a great way to relax and have a good time with the semester coming to an end. The students at the dance each attended for a variety of reasons, whether it was to show off their rad style, display their great dance moves or just to hang out with their friends. They all can agree that “Back to the Formal” was a night to...

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Midnight March
Apr24

Midnight March

Each year, UMHB seniors gather on a Friday night at the end of the spring semester for Midnight March. This year’s ceremony was held at midnight on Saturday, April 13. Students gathered near the Sesquicentennial Plaza in the Quad on Friday night in preparation for the seniors to arrive. During the week before Midnight March, members of the senior class decorate candles and distribute them to students and faculty who have impacted them in a positive manner during their time at UMHB. In addition, each senior chooses a member of the junior class to robe during the ceremony. At the event, students stand in a circle with their candles, and the seniors come around and light them. After all the candles are lit, the seniors robe the junior class. This gesture symbolizes the transition to the next group of seniors. After the juniors have been robed, the graduating class and the juniors usually sing the senior song, “Up with the Purple.” However, they did something different this year. Instead of singing the traditional song, all of the students participated in the Cru Spirit Dance, which is a fan favorite at football games and other school events. Senior Kelly Taylor, who is a double major in psychology and criminal justice, thinks that this change was a good one. “While ‘Up with the Purple’ is the senior song and it’s tradition to sing it, I feel that the Cru Spirit Dance was more fitting for this occasion because Midnight March is all about reflecting back on your time at UMHB, while ‘Up with the Purple’ looks more towards the future,” she said.“One of my first memories here is during Welcome Week at Spirit and Traditions, when the Cru Spirit Dance was played over and over and over again. It was nice to reflect back on that memory during this tradition.” After Midnight March ends, members of the graduating class can ring the Senior Bell. The bell is located near the Parker House, which contains the Musick Alumni Center and Museum. This year, free popcorn was available for students, and seniors were able to take home a commemorative cup. Bonnie Moriarty, a senior English education major, enjoyed being able to participate in Midnight March. “My favorite experience with Midnight March was how everything stayed centered on celebrating friendships at UMHB,” she said. “It was meaningful to light candles of underclassmen who impacted our time here.” Moriarty robed Chloe Poe, a sophomore education major. “I am so blessed to have a friend like Bonnie,” she said. “I hope I am as good[of]a dorm Resident Assistant as her. I can’t wait for when I...

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UMHB holds 80th annual Easter Pageant
Apr24

UMHB holds 80th annual Easter Pageant

Three wooden crosses lay on the grass by Luther Memorial in preparation for UMHB’s eightieth annual Easter Pageant on Wednesday, April 17. Though the event faced a 10 minute rain delay prior to the 12:30 show, this year’s production was otherwise another success and provided an opportunity for students to minister to members of the community. Junior engineering major Daniel Roberson served as an assistant director for this year’s Easter Pageant. “It really is an honor to be able to not only participate in, but to help direct Easter Pageant this year,” he said. “It is one of the most unique traditions that we have, and I am certain that it is something I will one day tell my children about.” The tradition of the Easter Pageant began in 1940 when UMHB President Gordon Singleton had an idea to use the ruins of Luther Hall to portray the story of Christ. The event gives students the opportunity to tell the story of the Resurrection and to share the story with the community. Students are encouraged to participate in this event, which also features children and grandchildren of UMHB students and staff. The university president selects students to portray Jesus and Mary for the production, which is student-led and directed. This year, Easter Pageant was directed by senior nursing major Katie Aday. Senior social work major Joey Mainini portrayed Christ and senior music education major Savannah Sepulveda portrayed Mary. The event also featured live music performed by UMHB’s One Voice, which consists of Sarah Ash, Kelli Chaka, James Jones, Hannah Killough, Tyler Medelin, Caleb Morrow, Ruben Ortega, Jancarlo Rodrigues, Douglas Stephen, Angel Tolbert, Katelyn White and Cydney Wilkerson. The songs featured were “In the Name of the Lord,” sung by Wilkerson; “Via Dolorosa,” sung by Sepulveda; “O Praise the Name,” sung by Frederickson; “Joy and Sorrow,” sung by Ray Martin. The performance also featured group renditions of “He is Jehovah” and “Any Other Way.” “Easter Pageant is my favorite tradition at UMHB and holds some of my most cherished memories,” said junior nursing major Emma Spellings, who was an assistant director for this year’s Easter Pageant. “I was honored to play a role in orchestrating something that so clearly speaks the Gospel.” Spellings encourages students who have not previously been involved in Easter Pageant to join the tradition in the future. “I would absolutely encourage anyone and everyone to get involved in Easter Pageant,” she said. “One misconception about Easter Pageant is that you have to have theater background or be a perfect Christian. Neither of those things are true. Easter Pageant is for everyone and offers authentic community and...

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