Fall Feast and Pumpkin Carving Contest

When: Wednesday, October 29 Time: 4:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Where: Hardy Hall

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Homecoming Semi-Formal

When: Saturday, November 8, 2008 Time: 9:00 p.m. – 1:00 a.m. Where: Mayborn Gym

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Opera theater exhibits talents
Oct21

Opera theater exhibits talents

On a Friday evening, many students head home for the weekend, but on Oct. 10, the students in the music department put on a show worth sticking around campus to attend. Junior Kathleen Shelton said it was an “opera scene show” consisting of individual songs from Sweeney Todd, The Bartered Bride, Madama Butterfly and many more. Senior Josh Hobratsch said, “I thoroughly enjoyed the show.” Kelly Criswell opened with “Adele’s Laughing Song” from  Die Fledermaus, followed by Leslie Cross with the “Lullaby” from The Consul. The department will host nine more performances. The Hillman Visiting Artist Series comes to campus Dec. 4,  bringing in top musical artists from all over the...

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Living examples of faith and business
Oct21

Living examples of faith and business

Dr. Seuss wrote a book on the wisdom of traveling. He told the truth of life’s ups and downs for millions of 8-year-olds to read, but disregarding age, its accuracy still applies. He says going anywhere is possible which describes UMHB’s 2008 Missions Emphasis Week theme—“Oh, The Places We Go!” The event started Oct. 20 and will conclude Oct. 24 at the chapel service. “It is a great opportunity to meet missionaries from around the world,” campus missionary Erica Valenta said. “We have 35 missionaries coming who altogether have served in 35 different countries.” The spin-off of the Seuss rhyme stresses missions are anywhere and now. The week sets students up with opportunities to show up and talk. MEW will host a variety of things showcasing all the different experiences of the missionaries. “Dialogue with missionaries; they’re incredible people, but real people none the less,” junior co-director Dennis Greeson said. “They are here to meet with you. Go to the different events and seminars, grab a missionary for lunch or dinner, take advantage of the opportunity to simply learn and have your worldview expanded.” The missionaries brought more than a speech. They offer their lives as an example of what being a missionary looks like. Dr. Jim King, dean of the College of Business, uses many missionaries with business backgrounds in his class to show students tangible proof that missions and work do interweave. He said, “Faculty members can talk about the integration of faith and business to accomplish kingdom purposes. And some of us have practical experience in what is normally called Business as Mission.  But when students have real business people like Dwight Nordstrom telling the students how they run real businesses and accomplish kingdom purposes, it carries a lot of weight in the eyes of students.” As a teacher, King recognizes the importance of exposing students to information that could potentially encourage them to combine their skill and work desires with a kingdom view. “It is especially important that faculty do everything possible to help students understand how they can utilize the gifts and talents that God has provided them to make a difference in their professional fields,” he said. “This is true for all majors without exception.  I believe that MEW provides the most convenient vehicle through which faculty can bring in experienced individuals in many, many majors to help the faculty give credibility to what they are trying to show students about the integration of their faith into their chosen fields.” King said of the many things to do, he finds the Missions Fair and seminars to be most helpful. “I strongly encourage students...

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Hispanic independence culture draws awareness
Sep30

Hispanic independence culture draws awareness

By Krystle Danuz “La fe mueve montanas”; faith moves mountains. With this message in mind, El Grito, the Mexican cry of independence from Spanish rule was yelled out in 1810. Beginning in mid-September and running through Oct. 15, Hispanics all around the world are celebrating independence, freedom and justice. A cultural event on campus hosted by Professor of social work, Dr. Jose Martinez, honored the president for the Heart of Texas chapter of The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) and community leader, Jose (Joe) Landez for his contributions to the Hispanic public. Also honored was director and treasurer of the Multi-Ethnic Cultural and Arts Association (MECA), Dr. Daniel Kott, for his continuous work in cultural music and dance education. Martinez spoke of Hispanic holidays that are integrated into the American culture and thus have created a unity between Spanish and Texas customs.( Of the main Hispanic cultures that are unified with the state is that of Mexico.) Martinez said that Cinco de Mayo, the Mexican national holiday that commemorates victory over the French army, for example, is celebrated throughout Mexico and America because 60% of all Hispanics are Mexican-American. The celebration is received all over the world because “We (Latinos) recognize each other as far as our heritage is concerned. We appreciate each other,” Martinez said. But Cinco de Mayo is more than an anniversary of independence. “The significance is … the idea that some people that are poor, sometimes powerless, can accomplish and can achieve,” he said, “in particular, against those who are powerful.” Joe Landez is helping to educate individuals about Spanish cultures and expose the contributions, which he feels have often gone unnoticed, made by Latins in American history. “I do have a story, and I do have a passion,” Landez said. “As I was growing up down the Rio Grande Valley (in) McAllen, we felt, I felt, we were not Americans. We refer to other folks that are not Mexicans as Americanos. … with that negative self-esteem, we were conditioned to believe that we were not part of the system. I thought of myself as a non-Americano.” Landez soon came to the realization that he, too, was American, but his Hispanic culture that was a part of his identity was being underrepresented in society. Mexican stereotypes were abundant, and he thought he was looked at negatively. “My passion began to ignite about me and my “raza,” my race,” he said. After spending 18 years in the Army, Landez was drafted into the race relations field where he learned a great deal about Hispanics and their largely overlooked participation in American history. “We were...

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Performances to feature faculty and special guest
Sep30

Performances to feature faculty and special guest

By Krystle Danuz See the music. Hear the artwork. Great artists are known to captivate and intrigue audiences with their ability to represent ideas in ways many cannot express. On Oct. 2 and 3 the English, art and music departments are going to be on center stage that also includes a guest performance by 2008 Texas Poet Laureate, Larry D. Thomas. The event is free of charge and open to the public. The art department is hosting a show displaying a few of the campus’ most creative professors and guests from the area. Called a “cross-discipline arts event,” the production will combine poetry, music and visual pieces. “It’s going to be fun,” chair of the music department, Dr. Lon W. Chaffin, said. “This is a unique event—something we’ve never tried before … that will become a regular event for the College of Visual and Performing Arts.” Since last spring, he has been working with artists, musicians and writers to develop the event. In the program, the title “Faraway Nearby” is described as “something (that) can be distant but remain close; foreign, but near at hand; long gone, but ever present.” The art exhibit will begin at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 2 in Hughes Recital Hall. Immediately following, the concert will commence with a screen displaying images to illustrate music and readings, as others perform. The reading will feature new and original poetry from three English professors: Assistant Professor Dr. Brady Peterson; Professor Dr. Cleatus Rattan; and English Chair Dr. Audell Shelburne. Musical accompaniment is composed by Chaffin and Justin Raines and performed with the assistance of special guests from New Mexico State University, Celeste Shearer, James E. Shearer and Martha Rowe. Visual images will be provided by six art professors: College of Visual and Performing Arts Dean,  Ted Barnes; Associate Professor,  Helen Kwiatkowski; Professor Phil Dunham; Associate Professor John Hancock;  Art Chair Hershall Seals; and Associate Professor Barbara Fontaine-White. Serious consideration went into the creation of each piece of art. Each poem describes a scene which is brought to life by music and art. “The objective of the series was to work from a piece of music and interpret it as a story in a nonobjective manner with a beginning, middle and an end,” Fontaine-White said. “The music I chose for inspiration was from the movie Fantasia. The colors work in harmony because they are complementary. Together the colors and shapes are meant to flow from panel to panel much as music would.” Acting as a guest poet in the production, is Larry D. Thomas. On Oct. 3 at 7 p.m. in Hughes he will read from his latest book, Larry D....

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