Jersey ties university and soldiers together
Mar10

Jersey ties university and soldiers together

One by one, the 4th Infantry Division soldiers left their headquarters in Iraq, each placing a hand on a UMHB football jersey, a reminder of home. Many soldiers of the 4th Infantry Division lost their lives fighting to bring peace to Iraq, a country in need. They fought proudly under the American flag and were reminded of UMHB’s support every time they saw the purple and gold jersey hanging on the wall. Recently, these soldiers were welcomed back to Texas by UMHB athletes, cheerleaders and others. Then on Feb. 25 at the Anderson Fieldhouse on campus, Commander of the 4th ID Maj. Gen. Jeffrey Hammond returned the gift given to him in September 2007 by the athletic program. The shirt  which served as an inspiration to his troops, was rededicated to the football team in honor of the families and 94 soldiers of the 4th ID who lost their lives. Hammond’s relationship with head football coach Pete Fredenburg began when he played under him at Louisiana State University. After seeing Hammond years later at a golf tournament in Fort Hood, Fredenburg invited him to give a pre-game speech to the university football team. It was the beginning of a fruitful relationship between the general and the  UMHB football program. The jersey dedication was an emotional gathering of about 50 people, including football players and coaches along with university officials and President Dr. Jerry Bawcom. “I just want to bring this jersey back to its rightful owners and tell you how grateful 4th ID and our families are of each of you,” Hammond said, “You’re living the dream. You’re playing football. You’re going to school. You’re getting an education. You’re going to make us all proud one day long into the future, but you sure made us proud over the year.” Fredenburg replied to Hammond. “Thank you for allowing all of us to share this with you. It has been very special ever since your first visit here. We will hang this, General Hammond, in a place of honor where football players for years to come will know what the sacrifices of those 94 soldiers meant to you and your soldiers and our football program. It has been a real honor to know you, and we cherish and honor your successes.” Hammond also addressed Bawcom and recognized the job he has done as president. “Sir, thank you for running such a magnificent university where kids have the freedom to learn and fulfill their dreams,” he said, “Kids like this can play football and have such great leadership in their coaching staff. If I could do it all over again, I...

Read More
Visiting artist exhibits iron pouring
Feb24

Visiting artist exhibits iron pouring

As the sun began to set on campus, another fire was burning bright orange and red at the York Art Studio. It came from the iron pour and casting demonstration performed Feb.12 by artist Preston Gilchrist, director of exhibitions and education at the River Oaks Arts Center in Alexandria, La. He explained the process. “We heat scrap iron and pour the metal into the molds for the castings,” he said. “Hershall (Seals) and Phil (Dun-ham) combined their art classes, and their students created the individual mold pieces used in the pouring. It’s an interesting concept and is a labor intensive project.” Professor of art Philip Dunham said, “It’s been a lot of work. Preston and his team drove eight hours from Louisiana, and we have been out here all day breaking up iron.” Dunham also wants to stimulate students to get involved. “You don’t have to have any experience to make something just as good as someone with experience,” he said. “I encourage students to take art, but you don’t have to have an art background. It’s a process of discovery.” Chair of the art department, Hershall Seals, wanted to get-up close exposure. “Our students got to meet and work with another non-faculty artist and to see first hand how inventive, helpful and hard-working artists tend to be,” he said. “Preston Gilchrist is a great example for students in this regard.” Seals also wanted to capture the curiosity of non-art students. “We brought the iron pour to campus so that art metals and sculpture students could understand the process of this exciting media and to generate interest from the general public, both of which were accomplished,” he said. Senior accounting/marketing major Russell Persky was interested in gaining insight from the demonstration. “I’m not much of an artist,” he said, “but this has broadened my horizons.” Junior theology/philosophy major Lydia Schmidt took a liking as well. “I think it’s really cool,” she said. “It’s really interesting, and it’s not your typical art.” Many students were involved with the abstract mold castings. Senior art major Amanda Garcia was one of them. “We made Styrofoam molds for the castings,” she said. “You definitely explore yourself and individuality in art. You are able to think outside of the box and create things.” Dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts, Ted Barnes, encourages everyone from the university to attend art events, saying that art can be a good socialization tool. “We’re trying to get more promotion out,” he said. “More people need to come out and see the exhibit and demonstration openings. This is a cultural event that most people never get...

Read More
Fun, laughter infuse lively Date Auction
Dec09

Fun, laughter infuse lively Date Auction

There was a cool, crisp breeze in the starry night. Lights twinkled in the trees, transforming the usually dull steps of Mabee into a romantic scene. The smell of hot chocolate and warm popcorn lingered in the air. It was the night of Date Auction. Some students were there to find a special someone, while others just wanted to enjoy a night with friends. Sophomore business finance major Lindsey Weaver was the master mind behind it all. “Date Auction is a fundraiser done by First Year Council to raise money for spring formal,” Weaver said. She likes being able to support the university and the school spirit of the student body. “FYC was a doorway for me to get involved and make friends,” she said “I’m excited to be a leader, and I’m proud to have had Date Auction as my fundraiser.” The most eligible bachelors on campus planned dates that the university’s young women could bid on. The girls didn’t know who their date might be, but had to bid based solely on what kind of date activity they wanted. Freshman business management major Stuart Bellan put some deep thought into his decision. “I want a nice romantic evening with a special girl,” he said. “I want to take my date to a fun dinner and then dancing. I want her to feel comfortable. If she doesn’t want to go dancing, then we will go play laser tag. That’s such a sweet game to play.” Sophomore business administration major Michael Beach was also trying to make his date memorable. “I just want my girl to have a comfortable time,” he said. “I want to make her laugh and to be sure that she has fun.” Not all of the men were just looking for a casual evening. Some were looking for love. Freshman business major Tobin Davies was searching for just that. “I want to find a wife,” he said. “My date will go on a scavenger hunt at Belton Lake that will lead her to a picnic.” Junior Christian studies major Tommy Wilson was wearing his heart on his sleeve. “This is a chance for me to meet someone in a deeper way and to have fun while doing it.” The thrill-seeking bidders had choices such as ice skating, rock climbing, bumper cars and even a ticket to see Texas country music star Aaron Watson in concert. Junior computer graphic design major Courtney Pett came to the event ready to bid. “I had my eye on a certain someone,” she said. “I feel that UMHB did a really good job with this fundraiser.” Freshman fine arts major...

Read More
Holidays & Festivities
Dec09

Holidays & Festivities

By Lindsay Schaefer Family and friends gather to observe Christmas all around the world by celebrating the holiday in many different ways. At UMHB, students highlight Christmas with special programs and activities during the holiday season. One of the first events was Crusader Christmas Dec. 4 with the lighting of the Luther Memorial. Students watched the movie Elf, drank hot chocolate, ate Christmas cookies and took pictures with Santa. Each of the women’s dorms hosted a mother-daughter weekend. They had dessert parties, Christmas caroling, various activities and games. Friday night, several male students added to the festivities by singing “Christmas Grams” to the students and moms, starting in Burt Hall. After a calm breakfast together, Saturday was left open for mothers and daughters to go Christmas shopping, watch a movie or participate in any other activity. To continue the Christmas spirit, the music department presented Jewels of the Season, its annual Choral Christmas Gala at First Baptist Church Belton. The night included many traditional Christmas carols such as “Joy to the World,” “Deck the Halls” and “Hark the Herald Angels Sing.” The choir also sang Assistant Professor of music Matt Crosby’s special arrangement of “Jingle Bells.” Tonight, the UMHB Instrumental Christmas Concert will be presented in the Mayborn Campus Center Arena at 7 p.m. It will offer a compilation of pieces by The Conservatory of Music Suzuki Groups and The Bell County Symphonic Band. The traditional pancake supper for students will take place Dec. 11 at 9 p.m. in Hardy Hall. Faculty and staff will serve the breakfast food to students. In the small town of Salado, the Christmas season is altered into a winter wonderland. Hundreds of lights hang from all the local businesses, and shopping and seasonal music are available. Locally there is the Belton Lake Outdoor Recreation Area present, Nature in Lights XII: A Holiday Tradition. This includes five miles of Christmas cheer for all to enjoy. For every car, mini-van and pick-up there is a $5 charge. Wrapping up the season, the College of Visual and Performing Arts recorded “Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol,” to air on KNCT radio, 91.3 FM. It will be broadcast on Christmas Eve at 7 p.m. and Christmas Day at 10...

Read More
Local church welcomes with love and food
Nov18

Local church welcomes with love and food

After chapel and classes on Wednesday, about 230 students make the less-than-a-mile trip to the First United Methodist Church on 3rd Avenue. Not for attending services, but to be served a home-cooked meal. The church has been providing lunches to college students in its fellowship hall for the past four years. Volunteers have seen tremendous growth, particularly in this year’s attendance. “We’re the victim of our own success,” said Jack Sykes, the chairman of the witness committee that sponsors the ministry. When they first began serving meals, there were typically 30-40 in attendance. This year, the response has been nearly overwhelming. “We budgeted based on last year’s attendance, which was 75-80 on average,” Sykes said. “This year, we started off with 140.” Due to rising food costs, the church had to make a decision. “We have two choices — either we cut back on the quality of the meal, which we don’t want to do,” Sykes said, “or we need some help.” First United Methodist recently added a donation box to the beginning of the food line, asking for a dollar donation. “The students that are coming seem to enjoy it. We don’t like the idea of having to ask for donations,” Sykes said. “We want to be clear on that. We don’t like it.” Sophomore education major Joanna Schildwachter said, “I think that’s fair enough. You get a good — size meal.” Overall, students seem to be responsive to their request for support. “It tastes good, and the least we can do is give a dollar,” Schildwacther said. Because the donation box has only been there a few weeks, the volunteers anticipate the word will get around in the near future. “We think it’ll get better as we go along,” Sykes said. There are usually 10 volunteers helping with everything from the prep work of browning 50 pounds of beef the day before, to giving students rides to and from campus, to cleaning up afterward. Some volunteers have been a part of the ministry from the get-go, while others willingly step in when needed. “I’m actually emergency help today,” volunteer Paul McKinley said. The kitchen was short staffed, but other members of First United Methodist filled in the gap. “It’s what I’m called to do; it’s part of being a church,” McKinley said. “It’s stepping up to the plate.” Gary Brown, who may be seen driving the bus to and from the church any given Wednesday, has been volunteering for three years. “I think it’s a good mission,” he said. “It keeps me busy. I’m retired twice.” Brown is equally amazed at the expansion. “The first year we...

Read More
Spotlight shines on 12 Angry Jurors
Nov18

Spotlight shines on 12 Angry Jurors

The lights brightened on the stage in Hughes Recital Hall to a trial having just taken place and leaving the jury members to decide whether a boy accused of murder was innocent or guilty. Bickering, turmoil and even some climactic fighting scenes broke out on stage during the first production of the season for the theater department. The play was 12 Angry Jurors and was shown Nov. 7 and 8. With a cast consisting of 13 members, the play was  based on the similiar work, 12 Angry Men. All the actors developed their own personality to the character they were portraying to the point that the audience could feel anger from the cast in the auditorium. Sophomore and juror number five, Marcus Repp, was one of the jurors who began to question the case near the beginning of the play. Repp and the other actors had to become accustomed to their character to make their performance believable. “We had to research . . . our character and adapt to the time period of the late 1950s,” he said. Most of the actors have been on stage before, either at UMHB or in high school. Juror number nine Ashley Ramirez, has been acting in plays ever since high school. She was in Macbeth along with more.As much as being on stage is thrilling, she said there’s a better aspect of acting. “Meeting all of the people is the best,” she said. “We all put so much dedication into it, and along the way we develop great friendships.” With any  production, there are multiple jobs that have to be completed for it to be a smooth showing. There are casting of the roles, set design, costume design, music coordinating and so on. However, there has to be someone in charg. For the 12 Angry Jurors the job belonged to senior Samantha Anderson, the stage director. “Basically I had to make sure everyone was at rehearsal, on time, make sure everyone knew where and when rehearsal was, read parts of missing actors, borrow props from other theaters, make random phone calls, (and) follow the script every night so actors could call for lines,” she said.“Being the stage manager is kind of having to be all over the place. I had to take care of the details and technical things.” With a neraly packed house both nights of parents and friends, the outcome of the production was positive. Sophomore nursing major, Sarah Herriott, went to the Saturday showing and enjoyed the diverse characters on stage. “The best thing about the play was getting to see all of the people I typically interact with...

Read More