Chapel explains cultures
Mar31

Chapel explains cultures

By Evangeline Ciupek Colorful flags from different countries lined the Walton Chapel stage behind a glass podium and two microphones. The President of Cross Cultural Cru, Viktoria Meadows, walked up to introduce International Chapel. Suddenly a microphone fell out of its holder and landed with a loud “thunk” on the podium. She smiled. “Hi, I’m Viktoria Meadows, and I break microphones,” she said. The students laughed. Cross Cultural Cru, an international organization, hosted chapel this month. Director of International Student Services, Elizabeth Tanaka, said 15 countries are represented by 59 enrolled international students. “Our biggest group is from China and after that Taiwan and after that India,” she said. There are also students from Morocco, Nigeria, the Bahamas and Kenya, to name a few. Last year at International Chapel, sophomore from Malaysia, Wan Juin Tan, performed a Chinese Kung Fu sword dance. This year, she gave the students a glimpse of her spiritual journey. Tan met God at UMHB. “I was so nervous when I first got here. Everything was so new. But then I became a Christian, and everything became better, easier, and everything made sense. I never felt nervous again. Everyone is here for me, and God is here for me all the time.” Since her sword dance in chapel a year ago, Tan has started a Chinese Kung Fu organization on campus. “I feel like I’m so involved, and now UMHB really became my school. Not only the school I go to in Texas, but the school I belong to,” she said. When she was considering coming to Texas, the first thought that came to her mind was the Texas stereotype of cowboys riding horses on the prairie. “I was wondering if I needed to learn how to ride a horse,” Tan said. Following her testimony, the audience played a trivia game. The international students asked questions that pertained to their countries. Students learned that the estimated inflation rate in Zimbabwe is five billion percent. In Kenya, people rent swimsuits when they go to the beach. And South Korean vendors sell duck bok yi just as New York vendors sell hot dogs. Business administration and management major, Jane Zhang, arrived in the U.S. this semester. She is from Beijing, China, and volunteered during the Beijing Olympics. As it is for most first-year students, her English as a Second Language courses consume her time. “I only study ESL. If I can’t finish it, I can’t begin my original classes. So I must finish it first. I don’t have a lot of time to miss the things in China. I chat with my parents everyday on MSN,” Zhang...

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Annual event encourages healthy living
Mar31

Annual event encourages healthy living

By Russell Dotson More than 500 people attended the annual Health Quest Friday at the Mayborn Campus Center. Representatives from 60 health related businesses in the greater Belton community set up booths with informative pamphlets and other items for visitors to take with them and receive various free health tests. Coordinator for Health Services, Debbie Rosenberger, said this is the 10th year for the free fair. “Counseling and Testing and the Health Center started Health Quest 10 years ago, which at that time were separate entities,” she said. Nate Williams, director of Counseling and Testing and Health Services, worked on creating the event 10 years ago with Jeannie Rupp, the former coordinator of Health Services. “Health Quest was in the Shelton Theatre until it grew too large. Then we moved it into the Sub,” Williams said. Rosenberger remembers the health fair from 2004, when she came to work at UMHB. “There were about 30 vendors. We had too many for Shelton, so we had a massage parlor down in the SUB,” she said. “It has really grown since then. Over 500 usually come. The purpose is to disseminate information about health so people can make healthy lifestyle choices and be informed….” This year’s fair had more vendors than every before. “Of the varying community organizations, all the local hospitals were here, as well as the Central Texas Council of Alcohol and Drug Abuse, Susan G. Komen’s Race for the Cure, American Cancer Society and Red Cross,” Rosenberger said. Many attendees walked around with little cups filled with a tasty red slushy. Lou Nichols, was giving the cups out to promote Sunny Sky Products, a line of health beverages. Several optometrists had booths, and even the Wal-Mart Vision Center promoted eye health. Not all of the booths were directed solely at personal health. Aware Central Texas, ACT, had a booth to spread awareness of child abuse and neglect. It is a non-profit organization that receives referrals from Child Protective Services. ACT gave out pamphlets showing people how to help by volunteering time. They also handed out invitations for an art auction at the Salado Silver Spur Theatre, April 16. The proceeds will go to Helping Hands Ministry and ACT. Just inside the arena’s double doors, Maryland Fenwick, a senior nursing major, stopped visitors to have them fill out raffle tickets. She invited students to fill out Health Quest evaluation forms for a chance to win an iPod Nano donated by Dr. Larry Montgomery from Montgomery Chiropractic. Fenwick helped organize and promote this year’s Health Quest fair as a part of her degree requirements. “The capstone project is a senior project...

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2009 Student Art Show

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Gift of gab propels speech team to success
Mar10

Gift of gab propels speech team to success

When children are born, they possess unique gifts. They may have great athletic ability, have the mind to break down the most complicated problems, or be able to create a musical masterpiece adored by millions. However, in order for that gift to reach its full potential, it must be developed. For the students on the speech team, their talent is the gift of gab. The team is coached by Dr. Kerry Owens of the Department of Communication and Media Studies. He coaches in tandem with his wife, Kathy Owens. Together they have been with the UMHB program for six years. “Coaching with my wife makes my job much easier. She’s very good at teaching students delivery skills while I prefer working with them on the content and organization.” Not to be confused with debate, the team travels all over the state giving speeches that they compose and deliver. Unlike the athletic programs, they are not separated by divisions. They regularly compete against big schools like Texas State University, Texas A&M, West Texas A&M and even the University of Texas. Their last competition took place Feb. 14 and 15 in which the team participated in the Speech on the Beach individual events tournament at Del Mar and San Jacinto College in Corpus Christi. Senior psychology major Dane’ll Leigh placed fifth in programmed oral interpretation of literature, freshman nursing major Jennifer Lum placed third in dramatic interpretation of literature, senior finance major Ruby Bowen placed second overall and senior performance studies major Adrian Turner placed second in duo interpretation of literature, as well as in prose reading. Both coaches were pleased with the results. Bowen’s second place overall ranking was a new plateau for the squad. “I’m extremely proud of our team this year,” Kathy Owens said. “We’ve never had a student place in individual sweeps before. It’s just astonishing.” No matter what students’ backgrounds or majors are, the team is always looking for willing, interested participants. Turner is one of the more recent additions to the team.  Most people know him as Tank. “That name came from high school football,” Turner said. “I was known for being able to hit people hard and move people out of the way. Now, most people don’t know what my real name is.” He played four years of football with the Cru  as a fullback, winning conference championships three out of the four. Owens was intrigued with Turner’s speaking ability after his fall performance in the play Twelve Angry Jurors. Since then, he has done four competitions with the speech team including prose and duo. He works with partner, Bowen, in the duo events....

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Jersey ties university and soldiers together
Mar10

Jersey ties university and soldiers together

One by one, the 4th Infantry Division soldiers left their headquarters in Iraq, each placing a hand on a UMHB football jersey, a reminder of home. Many soldiers of the 4th Infantry Division lost their lives fighting to bring peace to Iraq, a country in need. They fought proudly under the American flag and were reminded of UMHB’s support every time they saw the purple and gold jersey hanging on the wall. Recently, these soldiers were welcomed back to Texas by UMHB athletes, cheerleaders and others. Then on Feb. 25 at the Anderson Fieldhouse on campus, Commander of the 4th ID Maj. Gen. Jeffrey Hammond returned the gift given to him in September 2007 by the athletic program. The shirt  which served as an inspiration to his troops, was rededicated to the football team in honor of the families and 94 soldiers of the 4th ID who lost their lives. Hammond’s relationship with head football coach Pete Fredenburg began when he played under him at Louisiana State University. After seeing Hammond years later at a golf tournament in Fort Hood, Fredenburg invited him to give a pre-game speech to the university football team. It was the beginning of a fruitful relationship between the general and the  UMHB football program. The jersey dedication was an emotional gathering of about 50 people, including football players and coaches along with university officials and President Dr. Jerry Bawcom. “I just want to bring this jersey back to its rightful owners and tell you how grateful 4th ID and our families are of each of you,” Hammond said, “You’re living the dream. You’re playing football. You’re going to school. You’re getting an education. You’re going to make us all proud one day long into the future, but you sure made us proud over the year.” Fredenburg replied to Hammond. “Thank you for allowing all of us to share this with you. It has been very special ever since your first visit here. We will hang this, General Hammond, in a place of honor where football players for years to come will know what the sacrifices of those 94 soldiers meant to you and your soldiers and our football program. It has been a real honor to know you, and we cherish and honor your successes.” Hammond also addressed Bawcom and recognized the job he has done as president. “Sir, thank you for running such a magnificent university where kids have the freedom to learn and fulfill their dreams,” he said, “Kids like this can play football and have such great leadership in their coaching staff. If I could do it all over again, I...

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Visiting artist exhibits iron pouring
Feb24

Visiting artist exhibits iron pouring

As the sun began to set on campus, another fire was burning bright orange and red at the York Art Studio. It came from the iron pour and casting demonstration performed Feb.12 by artist Preston Gilchrist, director of exhibitions and education at the River Oaks Arts Center in Alexandria, La. He explained the process. “We heat scrap iron and pour the metal into the molds for the castings,” he said. “Hershall (Seals) and Phil (Dun-ham) combined their art classes, and their students created the individual mold pieces used in the pouring. It’s an interesting concept and is a labor intensive project.” Professor of art Philip Dunham said, “It’s been a lot of work. Preston and his team drove eight hours from Louisiana, and we have been out here all day breaking up iron.” Dunham also wants to stimulate students to get involved. “You don’t have to have any experience to make something just as good as someone with experience,” he said. “I encourage students to take art, but you don’t have to have an art background. It’s a process of discovery.” Chair of the art department, Hershall Seals, wanted to get-up close exposure. “Our students got to meet and work with another non-faculty artist and to see first hand how inventive, helpful and hard-working artists tend to be,” he said. “Preston Gilchrist is a great example for students in this regard.” Seals also wanted to capture the curiosity of non-art students. “We brought the iron pour to campus so that art metals and sculpture students could understand the process of this exciting media and to generate interest from the general public, both of which were accomplished,” he said. Senior accounting/marketing major Russell Persky was interested in gaining insight from the demonstration. “I’m not much of an artist,” he said, “but this has broadened my horizons.” Junior theology/philosophy major Lydia Schmidt took a liking as well. “I think it’s really cool,” she said. “It’s really interesting, and it’s not your typical art.” Many students were involved with the abstract mold castings. Senior art major Amanda Garcia was one of them. “We made Styrofoam molds for the castings,” she said. “You definitely explore yourself and individuality in art. You are able to think outside of the box and create things.” Dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts, Ted Barnes, encourages everyone from the university to attend art events, saying that art can be a good socialization tool. “We’re trying to get more promotion out,” he said. “More people need to come out and see the exhibit and demonstration openings. This is a cultural event that most people never get...

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