McLane men host big competition
Sep28

McLane men host big competition

Decked out in orange, pink, blue, red, green and white, the McLane men prepared for some serious competition. Some even sported face paint as a sign of their team pride and readiness to dominate. For the third year, McLane Hall held Color Wars Sept. 13-16, a competition to see which dorm wing was the overall best in volleyball, dodge ball, Family Feud and certain  knowledge competitions. Best of the best “Well, the general idea is that (McLane) won Hall Wars, so we already know we’re the best. Now we’re competing to see who is the best in McLane,” junior Christian studies major and resident assistant Percy Hudson said. He is captain of the orange team, which consists of several men in his hall. Each competed against the others for consecutive nights with the events covering several skill areas. “It’s four nights with different competitions each night. Whoever wins the most nights becomes the victor,” Hudson said. His high hopes for his team this year were evident as he said, “We’re going to win it all.” Many McLane residents discovered new friendships through the competitiveness. Hudson said, “It’s definitely been a huge bonding experience, not so much for the wings but more for the residence hall as a whole.” Even though this is the third year for Color Wars, not everything was the same as it had been before. “This year the biggest difference is the advertising budget that each wing was given for posters and colored paper. This boosted the amount of attendees at Color Wars overall,” he said. Competition heats up The dodge ball tournament was similar to a single-elimination style with the winner of each round advancing to play another winning team until the green team dominated in the final round. Tuesday night’s Family Feud ended with the blue team victorious. Wednesday was an intense night of knowledge competitions, and the red team proved the brightest. Thursday wrapped up the events with a final athletic competition of volleyball. The green team bumped, set and spiked it better than all the others and won the tournament. Freshman math major Seth Obey participated in Color Wars for the first time this year as a part of the red team. He was excited to compete with the other halls not just in sports but in other areas as well. “I’m looking forward to seeing which hall is the most skilled in the physical and mental challenges,” he said, “and, obviously, we’re the best.” With different types of events, the playing field was level and gave a better judgment of which team is truly the top dog. The McLane resident assistants...

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Revival hopes to ignite faith
Mar10

Revival hopes to ignite faith

During a Wednesday chapel in January, Wes Hamilton, a teaching pastor at Lake Pointe Church in Rockwall, captured students’ attention as he humored the audience while speaking of Christ’s love. “In any relationship, in any commitment… you have to know, in advance, everything that’s involved in that relationship,” he said. Hamilton encourages students to understand what is required and expected in all relationships. “And your faith, your relationship with Christ, is no different.” Ready to visit the campus and speak to students again at Revival — the university’s spring tradition held under the big white tent — Hamilton expressed his excitement for the upcoming event during a luncheon with the Revival steering committee. The committee learned more of Hamilton’s passion for the Lord. One of Revival’s co-directors, junior elementary education major Rebecca Widmer, finds Hamilton “intriguing”. She said, “One thing that really stuck out to me was that he was so real with us. He had a great sense of humor and was able to inspire us in a way that was encouraging.” By asking committee members why they are passionate about Revival, Hamilton made the group feel comfortable. “He wanted to get to know each of our hearts on a deeper and personal level,” Widmer said, “Some of the things he challenged us with will really allow us to think about this commitment.” Unraveling truth, Hamilton wants people to know “by following Christ you must understand, that you’re basically signing a blank check with your life…. You have no idea where this may take you, what He may do with you, or ultimately, what this will cost you.” This year’s revival theme is based on Jeremiah 24:7, “I will give them a heart to know me, that I am the Lord.” Open to the community, the event is held March 22-24 at 7 p.m. Adviser, Dr. George Loutherback is eager for Hamilton’s return. “He already has sort of a pulse beat of our campus,” Loutherback said. “Because he was here, he encountered students at Chapel, and at the luncheon he kind of got to know where we are spiritually and what our needs are.” Loutherback scheduled him to come to Chapel for those particular reasons. “He is fired up about coming here and already feels a connection between us, and that’s what excites me,” Loutherback said, “I don’t just want to have somebody coming in from wherever and doesn’t know who we are.” He believes Hamilton “has a good heart and is a good person” to be spiritually interacting with college students . The message Hamilton feeds is the same to any one, and his ability to connect...

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Pageant centers on humanity
Feb24

Pageant centers on humanity

The Wednesday before Easter, Luther Memorial transforms into the setting for a play about Jesus’ death and resurrection. This year’s Easter Pageant’s theme is humanity. Senior recreational leadership major Dennis Greeson, who will play Jesus, says the emphasis is that, “Jesus was relational. He didn’t set up programs or steps, it was more than him becoming a person.” The cast of Easter Pageant this year feels the deep need to portray the relationships found in the Bible and include others in what they are learning. For each role, there is a different perspective on the story and how it might have been in Jesus’ time. Senior Christian ministry major Daphne Davies, who is playing Mary, says the involvement has opened her eyes to a deeper understanding of the Word. “It has helped me to identify with (Scripture) on a different level. I wonder about all the in-between parts. I don’t know if she ever had moments of doubt. It made everything very personal, and I can’t help but think of Mary’s perspective,” she said. Greeson understands Jesus’ role and importance more than ever. While acting out the scenes and quoting Jesus, he is learning to think more about the gravity and meaning of Jesus’ words and actions. “It’s more than having a cognitive insight. It is emotional, and it blows my mind,” he said. The cast is learning the best way to minister to students on campus and the community. Greeson said, “We really want to be intentional of the impact of Easter Pageant, and we do that through relationships. That’s the best way.” Davies is thankful for the opportunity to be involved and amazed at how the university consistently supports such a big production. “It’s cool to think about all the different things that our campus does, and this is the one event that we don’t make any money off of, that’s free to whoever is involved, and free for whoever comes, and there’s no other purpose than to proclaim Christ with nothing in return,” she said. While preparing for Easter Pageant, the cast is hoping to get others involved. Several spots are still open for people in the crowd, and Davies thinks this is an opportunity to be challenged. “Whether you are a hard, fast seeker of Christ or a skeptic, being involved takes you straight to the front lines of Christ’s life. In either perspective it’s a chance to grow, to learn, and to know His life.” Junior communication major and Pageant Director Brandon Brewer thinks this exceeds all his other involvements on campus. “It’s by far the best reward I’ve gotten ever, and I’ve done...

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One act performers showcase their emotional stage presence
Nov12

One act performers showcase their emotional stage presence

Lush, classy costumes and big band sounds invoke the spirit of the roaring ’20s for a night of two one-act plays: a drama and a comedy. Director Michael Fox chose two pieces written by Texas playwright Horton Foote. He won academy awards for best screenplay 1983 for Tender Mercies and in 1962 for To Kill a Mockingbird. He wrote more than 50 one-act plays in his lifetime. “He is an award-winning, Texas playwright born in 1916,” Fox said. “And he died this year in March.” Performances were held in the Azalee Marshall Cultural Activities Center in Oct. 30 and 31. “The space is great. The technical support is outstanding, and it’s one of those places that is available,” Fox said. One-acts are plays that take place in one scene. “In a one-act everything happens from setting it up to the conflict to the resolution, if there’s a resolution to be had. There may not be,” Fox said. Spring Dance has no resolution. “It’s just a snapshot in time; it’s like you’re eavesdropping on these four troubled souls,” Fox said. The play is set in a sanitarium in Austin in the 1920s. “The theme that goes through the whole play is going home. They all want to go home,” Fox said. Freshman psychology major Joshua Kirwin played the part of Greene Hamilton. “He is an emotionally unstable gentleman in an insane asylum who is pretty high-strung, and he loves his shoes,” Kirwin said. Kirwin gave Greene a nervous tick and constantly wrung his hands on stage. “You have to find a happy medium between overacting and being a believable character in this play,” he said. Freshman Christian ministry major Levi Seymour played Dave Dushon, who remains silent during the one-act. “They needed a guy who didn’t talk at all, and so I was more than willing,” he said. During the performance, Seymore barely moves a muscle. “It’s hard not to laugh or smile for forty minutes in a row,” he said. Jennifer Loyd came in at the last minute to play the part of Annie, a forgetful woman who lives in the sanitarium. “She wasn’t the person that I originally cast,” Fox said. “She came in almost six weeks after we started rehearsals and she has done a wonderful job.” Freshman computer graphics design major Stephen Webster played the role of Cecil Henry. He seems sane until the last few minutes when he introduces himself to Annie, whom he has already met. “When you think of crazy people, you think they’re like jumping off the walls and in straitjackets… but that’s normally not the case,” Webster said. In Blind Date,...

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Simplicity of the Gospel: Finding Jesus in dead cat

The search for something profound often leads to silent disappointment, while the simplicity of life’s adventures can bring us to an unexpected point of reverence; so a 4-year-old boy I babysit showed me. As we went on our usual walk—pretending to be Woody and Jessie from Toy Story—we talked about fighting bad guys and finding Buzz Lightyear, and all the other random things that go through a young boy’s adventurous mind. But as we looked down the road, a giant white monster truck—or maybe it was just a Chevy Silverado— zoomed past leaving behind a squirming baby cat half run-over. After I instructed the young boy to stay on the sidewalk, I ran into the road and picked up the baby kitty before another car could hit it. It was horrific. The kitten’s eye was literally hanging by a thread, and blood was gushing down my arm. The cat was spastically jolting from a few functioning nerves. I laid it behind a rock so the child couldn’t see death overtake the small, helpless animal. I’m not going to lie. Though I’m 21 years old and the cat wasn’t even mine, I had to hold back tears. I couldn’t believe it. A half amputated cat just died, and I watched every moment of it. I don’t even like cats. But it was hard for me to see something happen to such an innocent creature. Of course, the little boy wanted to see the cat, so I led him over there to cease his curiosity. We had a mock funeral, which included some condolences and, of course, a prayer. Then we headed toward the creek to play in the water. “The cat died,” he kept repeating until we reached our final destination. “This is real sad. There’s blood on your hands.” He kept staring at the blood on my hands. After I rinsed my arms in the water, he looked at me and smiled. “Now we can be happy,” he exclaimed. “There’s no more blood on you, and the cat is with God.” Then he asked me a simple question that really made me think. “Did the cat die because he wasn’t supposed to be playing in the road?” “Yes, the cat did die because he was in the road,” I said. “And the road is dangerous. That’s why we can’t walk in the road.” He looked at me, content with the answer. “The cat died, and it was sad. And there was blood. But now there’s no blood so we can be happy because we know we cannot play in the road,” he said. I almost envied this young child’s...

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Hubble telescope shines in lecture
Apr21

Hubble telescope shines in lecture

By Garrett Pekar and Evangeline Ciupek Planets, star nurseries and black holes shone intensely on the wall of York Science Center’s Brindley Auditorium. These pictures, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, have aided scientists in their quest to learn more about the universe. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Representative, Dr. Clay Fulcher, gave a speech sponsored by the College of Humanities on “NASA: Training Astronauts and Servicing the Hubble Telescope.” The Hubble takes better pictures than any earth-based telescope because there is no atmosphere obstructing the view. “Basically, it’s the greatest investigative machine that’s been invented by man, as far as learning more about outer space, and where the universe came from and where it’s going,” Fulcher said. Black holes cannot be captured in a photo, but the Hubble has helped to uncover their se-crets. When a star suddenly disappears from the telescope’s image, it is swallowed by a black hole. That is how scientists know where black holes exist. “The Hubble (has) really opened the door to dark energy, dark matter and black holes. And this picture is actually a black hole,” Fulcher explained. “You can tell where it is because it’ll be sucking in stars.” In the past 19 years, the Hubble has been serviced four times. In these missions, astronauts completed tasks including replacing batteries and changing solar panels. “It was designed to last three to five years. It was launched in 1990, so it has far exceeded its lifetime,” Fulcher said. The next servicing mission will be May 12. The fifth mission holds a seven-member crew—six men and one woman. They will replace the original solar panels, among other things. The crew trains in a giant swimming pool at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. “It took a month to fill up this pool,” Fulcher said. Under the water, astronauts practice performing their mission on full-sized mock-ups of the telescope and space shuttle. “(Astronauts) can be rendered mutually buoyant …. That’s the closest approximation to being in zero-gravity space that you get,” Fulcher said. When the astronauts are ready for the real deal, all of the needed materials are packed into the space shuttle in a gigantic vertical assembly building. An equally enormous moving platform, called a crawler-transporter, moves it out to the launch pad. Fulcher paused at a 2002 picture of Shuttle Columbia before liftoff. A rainbow reaches down to touch the nose of the vehicle. “I like to think that God is pleased with man’s inquisitiveness and his interest in learning more about His creations,” he  said. Freshman computer science major, Drew Donahue, liked the pictures in Fulcher’s presentation. “They made it a...

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