Clash of Titans not epic enough
Apr13

Clash of Titans not epic enough

Clash of the Titans delivers dramatic action sequences and crisp effects, but leaves viewers unsatisfied with shallow writing and characters. Even with 3-D, Sam Worthington is still one dimensional. The basic concept of this remake of the 1981 film is that mankind is tired of the gods. They decide the best course of action is to rebel against Olympus. The protagonist Perseus, played by Worthington, is a demigod and has all the gifts needed to save humanity but wants to avoid his half-god roots. It follows the basic structure of all epics with a strange birth, tragedy, quest, obstacles and a great foe. Unfortunately for movie goers, anything they read in middle school about Greek mythology was more compelling than this story. Liam Neeson plays a strong, loving and sleazy Zeus. His portrayal is really fun to watch. The rest of the characters are better than the boring Perseus, but not awe inspiring. With big action films like this one, viewers should not expect too much character depth or story line. Even with lowered expectations, however, the action in Titans does not make up for the thrown together script. Titans opens much like the Disney film Hercules except the cartoon handled explaining the background of Greek mythology much better. In fact, the first half hour of the film stumbles as it tries to set up the epic quest and action sequences. The dialogue is bad and Perseus is totally inconsistent. Luckily, however, soon everyone shuts up and fights monsters, and that’s really what this movie is all about. The battles are fantastic. The mythological creatures are realistic yet still feel like special effects. Anyone who has any attachment to Greek mythology will enjoy watching these beautiful and terrifying creatures attack the men. The over-hyped Kraken is the least exciting of all the creatures in film, which makes the climax fall flat. In the end, Titans leaves you wishing you had seen more. The beauty and effects could have been complemented so well with just a little more care in the story telling. You never really care much about Perseus, and that’s what makes this movie just another soon-to-be-forgotten action romp. The film gets 2 1/2 out 5 stars for good...

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Clash of the Titans is not epic enough
Apr02

Clash of the Titans is not epic enough

Even with 3-D effects, Sam Worthington is still one dimensional. Clash of the Titans delivers dramatic action sequences and crisp effects, but leaves viewers unsatisfied with shallow writing and characters. The basic concept of this remake of the 1981 film is that mankind is tired of the gods. They decide the best course of action is to rebel against Olympus. The protagonist Perseus, played by Sam Worthington, is a demigod and has all the gifts needed to save humanity but wants to avoid his half-god roots. It follows the basic structure of all epics with a strange birth, tragedy, quest, obstacles and a great foe. Unfortunately for movie goers, anything they read in middle school about Greek mythology was more compelling than this story. Liam Neeson plays a strong, loving and sleazy Zeus. His portrayal is really fun to watch. The rest of the characters are better than the boring Perseus, but not awe inspiring. Titans opens very much like the Disney film Hercules except the cartoon handled explaining the background of Greek mythology much better. In fact, the first 30 minutes of the film stumbles as it tries to set up the epic quest and action sequences. The dialogue is bad and Perseus is totally inconsistent. Luckily, however, soon everyone shuts up and fights monsters, and that’s really what this movie is all about. The battles are fantastic. The mythological creatures are realistic yet still feel like special effects. Anyone who has any attachment to Greek mythology will enjoy watching these beautiful and terrifying creatures attack the men. The over-hyped Kraken is the least exciting of all the creatures in film, which makes the climax fall flat. In the end, Titans leaves you wishing you saw more. The beauty and effects could have been complemented so well with just a little more care in the story telling. You never really care much about Perseus and that’s what makes this movie just another soon-to-be-forgotten action romp. View the trailer...

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Alice in Wonderland – Up to the hype?

For a movie that did so well at the box office, the new Alice in Wonderland movie was just mediocre. Yes, there were some aspects of it that made it a good movie, but ultimately, the storyline left something to be desired. Granted, I have never seen the original Disney cartoon version, so that is probably why I didn’t like this new one. One of the two things this movie had going for it was the graphics. From the Red Queen ­– played by Helena Bonham Carter – and her massive head to the beautiful array of colors, the visual effects definitely helped this movie. And, of course, the acting was phenomenal. Who could not like Johnny Depp’s performance as the Mad Hatter? I love Depp and everything he has ever done, because he is an amazing actor. And he is amazing in this movie as well. When the audience is introduced to his character, I was creeped out by him and all his antics as the Hatter. But as the movie progresses the audience comes to love the Hatter for all the aid he gives Alice. Will I ever see this movie again? Probably not. But am I happy that I saw it? Yes. Maybe I’m just waiting to find a Tim Burton movie that is better than The Nightmare Before Christmas, but I’m beginning to realize that Burton can’t top that...

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Campus concert sparks hope for Haiti
Mar10

Campus concert sparks hope for Haiti

Almost two months after the earthquake in Haiti, students and community members joined together with many musicians to raise money for the financially ravaged country. Student Government Association joined with Campus Activities Board, Baptist Student Ministry and Spanish Club and created a benefit concert. With the help of other students, junior art major Alyssa Dickinson put together the show in order to give people throughout the community a chance to help Haiti. She said, “It came together really fast. We wanted to do something that was fruitful and profitable, but we knew we couldn’t wait too long.” The concert was headlined by singer-songwriter Jimmy Needham and featured music artist James Caronna as well as several university students. Caronna felt passionately about the benefit. He said, “I hope that awareness is raised not only for the quake but how great the poverty there is all the time. They were poor before, and they will be poor after, so people should always help.” Thursday night Michael Beach and Rashod Holmes entertained people walking around Luther Memorial visiting the different booths. Craft Cru was selling hair accessories such as headbands for Haiti. Coffee from the country was sold, and a tent was set up to show the living conditions of thousands of people there right now. Paintings and T-shirts were sold to raise money as well. The BSM booth had information about the Haitian language, an “In Tents” prayer experience, and an opportunity to write letters to children which Hope for the Hungry will take on its next trip to Haiti. Wristbands for entrance to both Thursday and Friday night concerts were $15, and all of the proceeds went to Hope for the Hungry. A group of 12 students will travel with Hope for the Hungry to Haiti over Spring break, and the money raised will be used to purchase items for the people that they will be ministering to on the trip. Friday’s concert featured JonDean, King, Fairview Avenue, and The Heart is a Lonely Hunter. Students who attended the concert came not only for the entertainment but out of a desire to do something for their brothers and sisters in Haiti who are suffering. Sophomore nursing major Delaine Jordan said, “Not that prayer for them isn’t enough, but it’s also about an outward action. Giving is the next step, and it was time for us to act on that.” Sophomore international business major Tobin Davies helped with the benefit event and did so from a deep concern to show God’s love. He said, “We’re very good at getting spiritually constipated where our inflow of love gets stuck inside us and...

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Uncertainty haunts fans
Mar10

Uncertainty haunts fans

By Emily Keahey Psychological thriller, Shutter Island, stuns viewers with sudden twists and an uncertain ending. Set in 1954, U.S. Marshals Teddy Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) and new partner Chuck Aule (Mark Ruffalo) go to the infamous Ashecliffe Asylum. Located on Shutter Island off the coast of Massachusetts, this nearly impenetrable mental hospital houses only the most dangerous criminally insane. They have been dispatched to investigate the disappearance of a murderess named Rachel Solando. The mystery is how she managed to escape; her cell has a secure metal bolt and is protected by guards 24/7. Dr. Cawley (Ben Kingsley) even says, “It’s as if she vanished through the walls.” While talking to Cawley about the facility and its treatments, Daniels learns that there is a war going on in the psychiatric community. Some believe in human experiments, which include lobotomies, while others are trying new psychotropic drugs. Cawley says they believe in listening to the patient and trying to make their existence more comfortable, but with all the creepiness in the movie, viewers get the feeling that he may not be completely honest with Daniels about the subject. Strange interviews with patients, an uncooperative staff and restricted buildings lead Daniels to quickly realize that something much more sinister is going on. Frustrated by the case and lack of progress he has made, Daniels threatens to go to the FBI, but the following day a hurricane hits and makes it impossible for the ferry to get to the island. As expected, the extra time on the island is where things get really interesting. Although some questions seem to be answered, even more are raised. Daniels seems to be haunted by the patients around him. The flashbacks of World War II and his dead wife add to his anxiety and the movie’s suspense as the line between reality and illusion blur. Director Martin Scorsese’s adaption from Dennis Lehane’s novel is fantastic. It is a dark, gothic plot that twists and surprises viewers until the end. From the initial fog on the ferry ride over to the razor-like cliffs of the island, an ominous mood is set. The performances from all the actors and actresses are great. Dicaprio’s unwavering accent is quite impressive, and Kingsley’s performance is one of the best he has done in years. Within the first weekend, Shutter Island earned more than $40 million and held the top of the box office list for two weeks. Originally scheduled to release last October, many suspected that the February premiere was a bad move, but the high ratings proved those pessimists wrong. This terrifying thriller keeps viewers captivated. Although it may be...

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Spring opera production proves: the show must go on

A beautifully performed, spring operetta, The Merry Widow, opened at Temple’s Cultural Activities Center this past weekend. With many setbacks during the rehearsal period of the production, the cast and crew came together to put on a great show. Director of the operetta was Dr. George Hogan, who praises the dedication of everyone involved. “There were days that we couldn’t have practice, like the snow day,” he said. “Other days some people had to miss due to illness. We also had a problem with our costumes being sent to the wrong city. But everyone persevered and didn’t let any of this get them down.” With a few bumps in the road, the cast and crew needed a way to lift their spirits. Luckily this production is light hearted and quite comical in areas. The main character is young widow, Hanna Glawari, who is extremely wealthy due to her husband’s recent death. Glawari decides to go to Paris were she is wooed by many men for her fortune. She does run into an old lover, Danilo, but his current life consists of wasting money at a maxim, women and drinking. With much bickering and uncovering of a fib, they are then together. With other little stories intertwined into this big one, The Merry Widow, is an opera that captures the audience with elements of comedy, exceptional singing and gorgeous costumes. Glawari was played by senior vocal performance major Kathleen Shelton. As a senior, she has worked on many UMHB productions in the past, but was happy with this one. “These past two months we as an ensemble have worked so hard. So many hours have gone into rehearsals, and we’re forced to turn down other fun things to do, but all for the greater purpose of the show,” she said. “But it’s what I absolutely love to do, so it’s no problem for me.” For Shelton, there is no greater satisfaction than to put forth countless hours of rehearsals, memorizing hundreds of lines and getting in front of people she doesn’t know in order to give them an hour and a half worth of content. “The Friday night audience was everything we could have asked for,” she said. “I think they really enjoyed it, and I know we did, it was so nice to finally have laughter and applause after months of delivering lines and learning notes.” The Merry Widow was performed by more than just UMHB students. An array of actors in the operetta ranged from UMHB staff and faculty. Also people of the Belton and Temple community were a part of the cast and crew. One of the...

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