Movie shows young poets’ work
Oct04

Movie shows young poets’ work

By Natasha Christian The annual Writers’ Festival hosted movie night for literature fanatics at Shelton Theater. This year’s showing was Louder Than a Bomb, an award-winning documentary directed and produced by Jon Siskel and Greg Jacobs. The film made its debut at the Austin Film Festival and won the award for best documentary feature. Set in the Chicago area, more than 60 schools battle in the world’s biggest youth poetry slam. The movie follows four teams as they transform painful life experiences into writing gold.  Director of the Writers’ Festival, English Assistant Professor Dr. Jessica Hooten, is excited about the documentary and said it gives viewers an enlightening perspective on poetry slam. She said,  “It is such an inspiring film…some of them (performers) are actually from the inner city and have issues with anger and issues with family lives that they need catharsis. They need ways of understanding what is going on in their lives and ways of dealing with that emotionally.”  She further iterates the cycle between pain being an inspiration for words and words becoming a coping mechanism. “Louder Than a Bomb shows how these students’ home lives have affected their poetry and how their poetry has formed their lives, and that reciprocal process between the two,” she said. “It’s a fantastic film.” The Writers’ Festival is roughly 10 years old. Well known published authors come to UMHB to speak to Crusaders and locals. Hooten is preparing for the gala on Feb. 9-11, 2012. Five writers, Susan Isaacs, Daniel Taylor, Susana Childress, Brett Foster and Albert Haley, will discuss a variety of topics, including spiritual themes and Christian identity. All speakers will host workshops for writing enthusiasts who wish to spruce up their skills. Junior English major Jamie Dye is ready to receive some words of wisdom from credible sources. “I’m hoping to gain some knowledge from people who are actually experienced writers and have been published,” she said.  “Their work has merit, and they’re willing to teach you. I hope they can teach me some tricks or tidbits.” Assistant Director of the Writers’ Festival and senior social work major Amberly Clay thinks the workshops at UMHB offer something other universities cannot. “Not a lot of writers’ festivals have one-on-one like ours does. A lot of writers’ festivals that you go to have 30-40 students in a workshop or even 100 students. Here, it is a very personal workshop,” she said. For those who are not interested in literature, Hooten said there is more to the event than meets the eye. She said, “The Writers’ Festival shows living writers who understand the power of literature to transform...

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Reality of TV vs. real life professions

Everything on television these days is either over scripted or over dramatic. With today’s reality-based shows, it seems that the entertainment world is trying to get a better grip on reality, but what is the “real” reality behind all those over-the-top TV shows? When it comes to professionals such as policemen, nurses, or chefs, these are difficult to accurately personify on camera. The problem is  that they are serious occupations, but does TV take the right steps in portraying them as they really are? Cold Case, Blue Bloods, and Criminal Minds are only a few current shows featuring on-screen cops. But do these shows come close to the real life of an officer? Director of Public Safety and Chief of Police at UMHB, Gary Sargent, was actually led to his career by a TV show series called Adam 12. As an adult, he has become less involved in shows with police characters. Sargent said, “I have been doing this for 30 years, and there have probably been about two or three days of drama like you see on TV shows all combined together. Most of it is just daily doing the same things over and over again.” He explained that some people have been in law enforcement for many years and have never even had to draw their weapon. “It is kind of like being a fireman. When the bell rings, you have to be able to perform, but the bell does not ring that often. That is what it is no matter where you are at in your law enforcement career.What you see on TV is just not accurate portrayal.” Another profession that is seen frequenting the television screen is nursing. With shows like Grey’s Anatomy, Nurse Jackie, and HawthoRNe, nurses are on every channel. Coordinator of Health Services, RN Debbie Rosenberger, said, “Most of them are not portrayed very well. They show us not adhering to our scope of practice and not being very compassionate and pretty ditzy in a lot of them.” She adds that there are a few shows that portray nurses with morals and character, but not many. “I do take great exception when they portray us as not caring because nurses are held in one of the highest regards for our credibility and our compassion, and I dislike it when the media erodes that.” She said that nurses are supposed to be patient advocates and that she would like to be able to turn on a show where they act as such. Another on-camera profession that has grown in popularity is that of a chef. From shows like Hell’s Kitchen, Top Chef, and...

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Pinterest blasts onto virtual screen

As if Facebook and Twitter are not time consuming enough, Silicon Valley has given us yet another tool for procrastination – Pinterest. It is a virtual board that allows members to pin things they are interested in and share them with the rest of the community. A pin is simply a picture of anything that shows up under a certain category. Once users see something that interests them, they can either repin it onto one of their boards or like it. Time magazine recognized Pinterest on its list of the 50 Best Websites of 2011 for its innovative technology.  It offers users a Pin It button that lets them grab pictures of their favorite things as they browse the Web. Senior elementary education major Taylor Tyre uses Pinterest to gather ideas for crafts and random things. “I love it because you can find and save your ideas all in one place,” she said. “Everyone’s creativity shines through one website.” Topics that members can browse are food and drink, travel, design, photography, fashion, wedding, do-it-yourself crafts, technology and many more. Senior elementary education major Miranda Moon was first attracted to Pinterest because of a pin about decorating classrooms. “It’s a money saver with all the DIY (do-it-yourself) stuff, and it also has really innovative, out-of-the-box ideas,” she said. “I just want to keep looking for more.” To become a member on Pinterest is fairly easy. Just find a friend who is a member and have that person invite you. Sign up with an email address, and your life will never be the same again. Junior accounting major Audrey Ohendalski has used Pinterest for decorating her bedroom and also to gather ideas for gifts to give her family and friends. “Pinterest is addicting because as you scroll down the page, you find more and more new ideas that you like or want to repin …. It is also addicting because it is so convenient,” she said. “You can easily see an item you love and post it in your personal online memory board.” Although it may seem that Pinterest is a female-dominated website, six out of the seven employees at the company are males, including the two co-founders. Guys, if planning your dream wedding or browsing photos of fashion does not sound appealing, how about starting a conversation with a girl like this, “So, yesterday on Pinterest….” No doubt  she’ll fall head over heels for you.  “I think Pinterest is definitely more of a girl-friendly website, but people can use it if they want to be more crafty or are looking for some original and thoughtful pieces ….,” Ohendalski said. One...

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New social network gives Facebook, Twitter a run for their money with expanded features

By Terryn Kelly There is a new social media networking site on the rise—Google+. Will this network prove to be a competition for the ever so  popular Facebook which made MySpace a distant memory? The new user interface is growing in numbers every day. People are quickly becoming addicted to the new swite as though there is still something left to be desired. Google+ has shortcomings just like other social networks but with time it may give Facebook a run for its money if they can meet all the requested needs from users. Members weigh in with thoughts about the website. Senior international business major Tobin Davies has been a member since July. He found out about Google+ from the different news sites he follows on Twitter and by word of mouth. “Presently, Facebook and Twitter definitely have first mover’s advantage, and Google+ has some ground to make up before it can really contend,” Davies said. Senior Christian studies major Percy Hudson has been a  member for four months. “I would definitely recommend this network to others. I would not say it is better than Facebook, but it is better than most networking sites.” The most common problem that many  users are running into is that they have fewer friends to chat with on this network because not many people know about it. The website differs from many because a user cannot simply create an account. One must first receive an invite from an active member. “I would recommend people to join Google+, but it is still limited by the lack of users. I think that Google+ has the potential to be great because it will offer more features in the long run,” Davies said. Senior nursing major Andrew Kester has been a member for three months. At the moment he does not think Google+ is better than Facebook because people have not yet made the transition. “Not as many people are on it, so it is not easy to communicate,” he said. Google+ has released an app for iPhones. The new site has many new features and even offers new users a demo tour of how everything works. To organize friends,  there are circles that allow the user to group people in a category. For example, one may have a circle for work associates so everything shared would be work related whereas another circle could be for family, and personal things could be shared. Hangouts allow the user to video chat with up to 10 friends at the same time, and Huddle is used for group chatting. There is also the common photo feature that allows the user...

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The Lion King back in 3-D

One of the most beloved movie classics of all time was re-released Friday in select theaters – Walt Disney’s The Lion King.  For those unfamiliar with the plot, The Lion King is about a young ambitious lion, Simba, whose father Mufasa, the king, is killed by jealous uncle Scar. Simba, thinking it is his fault, flees Pride Rock and meets some colorful   characters. As Simba grows older and after years of exile, he is persuaded to return home to overthrow Scar and claim the kingdom as his own, thus completing the “Circle of Life.” This time the film is enhanced with 3-D effects to attract not just the older generation, but also the new one that has never experienced The Lion King in theaters before. Some who were just children 17 years ago have the chance to make this the first Disney film their kids see in a theater. Millions of devoted fans are thrilled that the movie is being re-released. Junior sport management major Alexandra Taylor said, “I was 4 years old when The Lion King came out, and I thought it was the greatest thing I’d ever seen. I wanted to go back every day and watch it. To this day, it is still my favorite movie.  Watching it reminds me of my                    childhood, and I know when I see it again, I will feel like a kid once more.”  Junior math major Melissa Donham said, “I loved The Lion King when I first saw it. Excluding all the princess movies, it’s definitely one of the best Disney movies. All the songs are great. When I first saw the preview in                 theaters, I got really excited.” There are mixed feelings about the changes to The Lion King, however.  Junior psychology major Audrey Hale said, “It seems like everything is in 3-D now. Making The Lion King in 3-D makes me sad. It’s as if a little bit of my childhood is being taken away. I’m sure little kids will love it, but we know the old version. It’s more sentimental.” This re-release of The Lion King sparks a possible new trend. Will more classic, traditionally hand-drawn animated movies become 3-D? There has been discussion within the Disney Company that, if Lion King does well, Snow White and the Seven Dwarves and Alice in Wonderland will be the next ones to be digitalized.   Donham says that re-releasing cartoons is a great idea. “It’s really smart on their part. People like me, absolutely love Disney movies, so they’ll make a lot of money doing it. “  Hale said, “We’ll certainly go with a big group so we can all...

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New channels for student enjoyment
Sep13

New channels for student enjoyment

In today’s world, the media and entertainment are everything, and if you aren’t up to date, you’re out of the loop. Luckily, the university has upgraded its television package to Campus Televideo, a partner of DirecTV. The previous service provider, Time Warner Cable, under the Digital Transitions and Public Safety Act of 2005, began switching channels to digital broadcast. This created a problem as it would hardly be practical for the university to provide digital-analogue converter boxes for all of the televisions on campus. Thus, Information Technology personnel began searching for a new provider and service. Director of IT Shawn Kung best describes the choice as follows: “Campus Televideo is able to provide more       channels, especially sports, for less than the cost of our previous provider.” With 100 channels, 15 in high-definition and 14 sports channels, the choice was clear. However, with such variety to choose from, students could spend hours on end watching television. Vice President for Student Life Dr. Byron Weathersbee addressed this issue by reminding students, “We are to be in this world, not of this world.” If the student body can realize that reminder, it can experience the great entertainment that has been offered this year and remain an “unapologetically       Christ-like university,” Weathersbee said. Also, on top of the popular entertainment channels, UMHB decided to implement a few channels for its own use. “Channel 2 is our lineup. We purposefully left channel 3 blank for analogue devices, 4 is the UMHB information   channel, and 5 is reserved for airing university events such as ceremonies or football games,” Kung said. Also, the IT department has introduced an emergency broadcast system, which will take over all television channels with a red  message screen informing students of severe weather, school closures and campus lockdowns. The message will yield to regular programing after a few minutes, except in case of a lockdown, when it will remain on the air until cleared by campus police. Sophomore sports management major, Esther Gibbs, is in her third semester as a student worker for IT, said, “The new    system could be very useful, but, hopefully, we won’t have to use it that much.” With safety measures in place and    entertainment galore, the student body can expect to rely on Campus Televideo for entertainment for the entirety of the three-year...

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