African concert rocks Hughes
Oct18

African concert rocks Hughes

By Katie Maze One Voice Choir performed for a full house Oct. 13 in Hughes Recital Hall. The performance provided the audience with diverse entertainment from the African culture and the opportunity to experience it firsthand. “I thought it was lovely,” said freshman pre-med biology major Kendrell Jackson. “I’m a big music person, so I love all the harmonies and drums. I like that I was able to get to see something new and different.” Accompanied by professor of performing and visual arts Dr. Stephen Crawford, the choir performed traditional songs and chants from various countries in Africa. Use of authentic instruments added to the ambiance inside the tiny theater. Singers stood semi-circle around Crawford as he played the kpanlogo drum, originally used by people in Ghana to communicate over long distances. He delivered a solo on the marimba, a wooden instrument prevalent in Africa. All music was created by African percussion instruments, most of which belong to Crawford’s personal collection. Both he and conductor Matt Crosby dressed in formal African robes called dashiki, normally worn by men on special occasions in Nigeria. “It was difficult to play one beat while singing along with another, but we wanted to use instruments and things that were authentic,” Crosby said. He encouraged audience members to stand and sing along with the choir, an element unique to this particular African installation. He said he wanted to take the listeners out of their comfort zone so that they could truly experience the music. “I didn’t want the  audience to just watch a formal concert. This is something that really has to be experienced outside the box in order to truly embrace the spirit of  African music,” Crosby said. Freshman music education major Amber Como, who attended the performance as a lab  requirement, said, “I like the originality and the fact that it incorporated the audience with the performance. That was my favorite part. This definitely didn’t feel like homework.” Crosby said he was inspired to celebrate African culture because of a few weeks he spent in Nigeria in 2005 teaching at the Nigerian Baptist Theological Seminary. He and Crawford joined forces last spring and began research on Africa’s music and culture. They worked together to combine the nature of freedom with modern Western elements to pay homage to the music’s colorful culture. “The rhythm and freedom they have really inspired me …. The spirit of the Nigerians is wonderful, and I really wanted to capture that. We’ve never done African music before, so it was time we experimented with it.” Crosby explained the impact studying African music has had on the members of...

Read More

Edgar Allen Poe: topic of festival for poetry lovers

By Terryn Kelly For those who find delight in food, Edgar Allen Poe and Halloween costumes, this event is the perfect match. A Poe Fest, sponsored by the Sigma Tau Delta society will be held Oct. 28 at 7 p.m.  in the amphitheater on the corner of King Street and 9th. Assistant Professor and English Department Chair Dr. Jacky Dumas has been a part of the event since he came to the university. There is a learning factor behind the motivation for the bash.  “One of the goals of the Sigma Tau Delta society is to help promote literacy and a love of literature on campus. Although Poe’s birthday is later in the year, his style of writing fits Halloween really well. Traditionally, what we do are readings of Poe’s work, particularly The Raven, because that’s probably the most well known,” Dumas said. There will be some   changes added to the celebration. “This year we are going to have a literary contest and an art contest for poetry and artwork that is inspired by Poe’s writing. People will submit those selections to me; the deadline for that is Wednesday 26th. The Sigma groups will … pick the top two or three in each category. We will read those at the party,” he said. For students who like dressing up for Halloween, attending the Poe Fest should be fun. “We will also do a costume contest to fit with the Halloween theme, and it doesn’t have to be Poe related,” Dumas said. “Just come dressed as whatever you want to be dressed as. We also do a prize for best costume. Having the Poe Fest is a different way to get a major figure in literature out there but also celebrate the season in the same fashion.” Senior English major Lindsay Prater was inducted into Sigma Tau Delta last year. She enjoys helping with the event and putting the final, eerie touches on the Halloween decorations in the outdoor ampitheater. “We each come ensuring that we are spookily dressed, usually literary themed. Last year, I was the Phantom of the Opera. We decorate the amphitheater with dark décor and play spooky background music. The whole event is just a fun time to hang out in costume and be a bit of a literature nerd,” she said. Sophomore nursing major Linda Rubio had not heard of the Poe Fest until recently. She was surprised to learn that anyone interested in the event was welcome to attend. Not only can attendees learn about the famous writings of Poe, but there is also the potential to meet new people with whom they may...

Read More

Crowder band says goodbyes

Millions of fans were disappointed to hear that the Grammy nominated and Dove award-winning David Crowder Band was disbanding after playing more than a decade together.  The group began in 1995. Lead vocalist David Crowder realized that many Baylor students were not attending church, so he and fellow band member Chris Seay started the University Baptist Church in Waco. The band’s song “Rise Up” became Baylor’s theme song for football games. As the church grew, Crowder began writing songs to include in the worship service, and eventually the church released an independent CD called Pour Over Me and many more followed.  Soon the band became extremely popular, earning spots on the Billboard 200 and the iTunes top downloads. Their albums became a mix of bluegrass, folk, alternative and worship, woven together with electronic undertones. They began winning awards and released a total of six albums. It was early May of this year that band members decided to call it quits for a number of reasons. After finishing their sixth album, they couldn’t really see what would follow next. Some members wanted to spend more time with their families, start writing, go back to school, pursue ministry opportunities or work on other music. In the end, it was unanimous among the group to retire. Fans were surprised but understanding about the band’s decision.  Junior youth ministry major James Griffith said, “They weren’t a band I would say I followed, although one I greatly respected, so I was only a bit grieved when I heard they weren’t going to make any more albums together. I certainly don’t think they will soon be forgotten.”  Students agreed they will miss the band but their music would live on. Sophomore nursing major Kaylynn Armstrong said, “I wasn’t too heartbroken, but they have made some great music through the years, and I will be sad to see them go.” College students have been listening to David Crowder since they were in middle school.  Junior psychology and communication major Jasper Gates said, “I got interested in David Crowder Band when we used to play a lot of their stuff during worship, and my mom got me a CD of theirs, so I started listening to them. It was Illuminate, a good album. And so, during junior high, I started listening and following them a lot.” The band will soon be giving a three-month national tour to say their goodbyes to fans. It is called The 7 Tour and has been highly anticipated.  They will perform with other Christian artists such as Gungor, Chris August and John Mark McMillan. According to their web site, the shows will...

Read More

Footloose bursts back on the big screen with fans unsure of change

By Lauren Jones After hearing that the 1984 Footloose was remade, many refused to see it because some movies shouldn’t be touched. However, those who hadn’t seen the original were pleasantly surprised. The film, starring Kenny Wormald, Julianne Hough and Dennis Quaid, is a feel-good movie, and many who have seen it agree that those not wanting to see it should give it a chance. Footloose is the story of Ren McCormack (Wormald), a teen rebel from Boston who moves to the small town of Bomont to live with his aunt and uncle after his mother’s death. He quickly learns of the town’s strict laws; playing loud music and dancing is forbidden. The laws were established by Bomont city councilman and Reverend Shaw Moore (Quaid), whose son and four other teenagers were killed in a car accident after a night of drinking, playing loud music and dancing. Ren is frustrated by these rules but learns that he isn’t alone after meeting the reverend’s daughter. Ariel (Hough) is a troubled teen whose only dream is to leave Bomont. With the help of his friends Willard (Miles Teller) and Rusty (Ziah Colon), Ren challenges the laws and moves that the  prohibiting of public dancing be abolished. The acting is good and the movie is nearly identical to the original except for a few major parts (the scene where Ariel stands between two cars driving down a highway was cut), but many who have seen the first Footloose would agree that it just isn’t the same. It’s hard to judge characters in the new film without comparing them to the original actors. And while Wormald does a good job portraying Ren, most would agree he’s no Kevin Bacon. The dancing was choreographed well, although the style has been adapted for this generation and may not appeal to those who love the original. If you’ve never seen the 1984 Footloose, you may like the new version. Sophomore education major Niata Owens said, “I liked the storyline of it, and I liked the ending. It wasn’t what I expected, but it was still a really good movie.” Sophomore communication major Kent Franze was skeptical about seeing the film. “I went in thinking it wasn’t going to be good and that it was going to be corny and shame the original, but I left with a positive outlook,” he said. “I was happy with the movie overall.” After noting remakes that have been made this year, it seems the movie industry is running out of ideas. However, it’s no reason to write off a movie that may be better than you think.  Owens said, “Even if...

Read More

Facebook users grapple with change

By Terryn Kelly Facebook is an ever-changing social network. The company is constantly updating the site with new features intended to make the experience more enticing. Unfortunately, for some users the regular revisions of the interface appear to be more of a burden than they are a help. Freshman cellular biology major Megan LaLonde said, “I have not used any of the new applications on Facebook, reason being because it changes every time I get on my page. I like the older version.” An expanding number of the Facebook community continues to favor the earlier adaptations of the site. Senior cellular biology major Angel Cook said, “I prefer the older version of Facebook because it was simpler and easier to use. I do not like the idea that Facebook is always making updates and changes without informing its users that they are doing so.” Since the users are the ones who have helped make the website what it is today, Cook thinks that Mark Zuckerberg should get some insight from members on how they feel about the current features on Facebook before making changes.  “I do not like the fact that they do not ask for the users’ input on what changes we would like to see. After they have acquired a substantial amount of suggestions, they should allow us to vote on them and then make the changes that we all agreed upon,” she said. When using group chat, the user can communicate with friends outside of the group and from the usual chat feed. Senior music major Tasha Jefferson has used the feature but has mixed emotions about doing so. “I have used it, but it does get annoying when you do not want or need the feature. It is helpful when you want to group chat or to get group messages across.” Another feature is a tab that allows people to see what they posted on the same day an entire year ago. Jefferson has used this feature before and said she loves it. There is also a smart list which allows the user to determine who will be able to see certain subjects that are posted. Cook finds this feature to be helpful to her. “I have some professors and older people as my friends on Facebook, and some things I post are just for the young people and not for them. Sometimes I post what is on my mind,” she said. LaLonde occasionally uses the feature as needed. She said, “If I am looking for a specific answer that has to do with that general area I can click on it and ‘stock’ to...

Read More
Gungor release filled with creativity, emotion
Oct04

Gungor release filled with creativity, emotion

Michael Gungor tweets, “Do we move the horn player so that he isn’t so blocked by the concert bass drum? These are OK problems to have.” This is what the leader of the band Gungor has to wrestle with as his band tours across the country promoting a new album Ghost Upon the Earth. Despite the instruments described, the group isn’t a symphony or jazz group. And it isn’t exactly a rock band either. Gungor calls its music “liturgical post-rock,” and the new album strays even further from the realm of traditional contemporary Christian music than the breakout 2010 album  Beautiful Things. It is music designed to reflect the emotional reaction to life, creation, pain and the mysterious connection between God and man. Ghosts Upon the Earth plays more like an experience than a worship album. The tracks are musically and lyrically complicated and diverse. The band surprises listeners with  string, flutes, minor keys and accidentals. These are not songs that will or should be covered by amateur guitarists at camps, or be heard around the country on Sunday morning church services. Gungor, the leader of the group, didn’t start the band to follow in the footsteps of Matt Redman, but to honestly and purposefully express himself and the band. According to the web site, the record is full of meaning, from fast violin arpeggios that represent a primordial universe to the first heart beats of Michael and his wife Lisa’s baby girl,  it’s much different than a lot of music out there. Gungor songs typically convey the feeling of the message through the music itself, not just the lyrics. The song ‘When Death Dies’ seems to transform from an elegy into a bass-and-drum driven dance song, paralleling the resurrection itself as Gungor sings, “When death dies, all things live.” The song “Ezekiel” beautifully sets Ezekiel 16 to music as tender as the grace it describes, and the listener can feel the pain of God through the notes. Ghosts upon the Earth is exactly what should be expected from Gungor. It’s a different form of worship than what is heard in most contemporary churches, but it emphasizes the beauty and art involved in worshiping. It invokes awe in the way a poem or great painting might. It may not be made for participation, but listen to it to hear gifted artists create for their creator. “Music doesn’t have to fit the mold to move people’s hearts, and at the end of the day, that’s really what we’re trying to do,” Gungor said in an interview on his site. “We’re trying to make honest music that opens people’s...

Read More
Page 20 of 39« First...10...1819202122...30...Last »