The Disney College Program: a look behind the mouse ears
Oct10

The Disney College Program: a look behind the mouse ears

Do you want to have fun? Want to live in Disney World for a whole semester? Want to get college credit? Then the Disney College Program is the internship for you. This program lets you live at Walt Disney World or Disneyland for a whole semester. You get to work at the park and you also get paid as well. There are a lot of different departments that you can work with. You can work with attractions or transportation, or, you can work as a convention guide, custodian, or photographer, to name a few positions. A student named Kylie Wittmer, who was a film and television major when she participated in the program, said positive things about it. “The best things about the program are the friends you make while you’re there and being able to call Disney World your home,” Wittmer said. “People will tell you that the friends you make at Disney World are lifelong friends and you may think that sounds dramatic but they are right, you get to know these people at the happiest place on earth. You will get to know each park like the back of your hand and really never get sick of it. I can’t see advertisements for Disney World anymore without being sad that I’m not there.“ During a Disney College Program information meeting at UMHB on Sept. 26, Assistant Professor (Management) Chris Langford had a similar sentiment, because he loved his time at Disney and he wants students to experience the program. ”Going to the Disney College Program was one of the top five experiences of my life,” Langford said. “I worked at Splash Mountain and me and my group of friends were called Splash Trash. After the program we used to go on trips to Dis- ney World.” Film studies major Alyssa Silva was accepted into the Disney College Program for the spring 2019 semester with a custodial position. “I applied the day applications came out in August,” Silva said. “Within two weeks, I received an email with a link to the second step of the application which was a web based interview. As soon as I finished the web-based interview, I was informed I made it to the last step, the phone interview. I scheduled my phone interview and the day of I was super nervous, but I feel as though I did well and was confident. Then, after four long weeks of waiting, I got the magical email saying I got accepted into the DCP! I was at a stunt night rehearsal when I found out and had tears of joy. I then called my mom...

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79th Easter Pageant
Apr11

79th Easter Pageant

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Black Panther: The movie that’s taking the nation by storm
Feb21

Black Panther: The movie that’s taking the nation by storm

Black Panther, one of the most anticipated movies of the year, is revolutionizing superhero movies and carving a path for more movies like it. The film was released into theaters on Friday Feb. 16, with some theaters showing screenings the evening before to help make room for eager audiences. African American director Ryan Coogler oversaw the movie’s production, and the movie has a mainly black cast. Coogler focuses on bringing authenticity to the marvel cinematic universe by incorporating different parts of African culture into the world of the Black Panther. Coogler brought in consultants who are experts on African history and politics to work on defining Wakanda— a fictional African nation in the film that comes from the real Wakamba tribe of Kenya. The fighting used inthe film is based on African martial arts. With the use of real world cultures in a fantasy world, fans were ecstatic when news of the films production was released (IMBD.com). With preorder ticket sales and box office sales were estimated to be around $218 million in its first weekend (Nytimes.com). It was predicted that this would be enough to make Black Panther the fifth highest opening weekend in the history of Marvel Studios, and could break the current record for the President’s Day box office sales (comicbook.com). According to NBC, the film is now the first highest opening weekend for Marvel movies. On Jan. 10, 2018, after tickets were made available for presale, Fandango’s managing editor, Erik Davis, tweeted that the movie’s first 24 hours of advance ticket sales exceeded those of any other movie from the Marvel Cinematic Universe (Nytimes.com). This, however, came as no surprise seeing as how the movie’s teaser—not the full trailer for the movie, reached 89 million views in just 24 hours. For a short time there was even a “Black Panther Challenge” which was an online fundraising effort to help kids in Harlem see the movie. Ellen DeGeneres helped push the challenge and it blossomed to include more than 300 fundraisers aiming to send thousands of young fans to the theaters (Cbsnew.com) People all over America gathered to watch the film’s early release in select theaters nationwide, including Temple’s Cinemark. Junior graphic design major, Chriscina Lampkin, saw the early showing of the film with a group of friends, having preordered tickets over a month before. “I’ve seen a lot of Marvel movies and [The Black Panther] was good in many ways,” Lampkin said. “The movie impacted me positively because it is good to have representation. And the roles are usually flipped in every other movie, having a majority of the major roles being white with a...

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“Full Circle” art exhibit features work of Dr. Wynona Alexander
Jan26

“Full Circle” art exhibit features work of Dr. Wynona Alexander

The University of Mary Hardin-Baylor Art Department is featuring a gallery of works by artist and professor Dr. Wynona Alexander, an influential artist from Central Texas. Alexander was a member of the UMHB art faculty from 1968-1969, prior to chairing the Central Texas Fine Arts College from 1969 until her retirement in 2010. She is currently serving as an adjunct professor at Central Texas College. Alexander’s exhibit, “Full Circle: Wynona Alexander, A Retrospective,” features 44 unique pieces of jewelry and assemblages. The pieces of art span over 30 years, with the oldest work of art created in 1984. The most recent piece was created just last year. Even though the art spans a great time length, there is a distinct continuity between her oldest and most recent art. Many of her pieces are created with antique items that have been repurposed to create new forms of art. Alexander’s techniques give old items a new life as something beautiful and out of the ordinary. Her jewelry pieces pack a lot of beauty into a small form with the assemblages that take items that would normally never be considered as complimentary pieces. She incorporates different items, such as pieces of a doll and a ruler to create a piece of artwork. Alexander’s display can be seen Monday through Friday from 9am to 4pm in the gallery at the Baugh Center for the Visual Arts (room 106). Her display has been open since January 8 and will remain open until February 9, 2018. For those who have enjoyed Alexander’s gallery, there will be another exhibit in Baugh Center for the Visual Arts from February 19, 2018 until March 16, 2018. This will be a traveling exhibit called “Through the Iris,” involving the work of 25 female artists. The show, “Through the Iris,” features many different types of art in several...

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Movies, popcorn, and winter chill: Review of The Greatest Showman
Jan26

Movies, popcorn, and winter chill: Review of The Greatest Showman

The Greatest Showman is enamoring audiences at the box office with its flashy costumes, catchy soundtrack, and star-studded cast. Hugh Jackman traded in his wolverine claws for a ring master’s costume and an impressive singing voice to portray the historical figure, Phineas Taylor Barnum, who is best known for founding the Barnum and Bailey Circus with James Anthony Bailey in 1881. The beginning of the film resembles the opening of Queen’s hit, “We Will Rock You,” as Barnum, dressed in his glitzy ringmaster’s costume, sings about “The Greatest Show” as the audience stomps their feet and claps. Then, the film flashes back to the 1820s when Barnum (Ellis Robin) is a kid who travels with his tailor father to rich people’s houses. It’s on one of these trips where he meets Charity Halletts (Skylar Dunn). The two children begin spending time together, unbeknownst by her father (Frederic Lehne). This prompts the duet, “A Million Dreams,” where the audiences watch the young children grow up into adults. This song also establishes their love for each other. Barnum wins Charity’s (Michelle Williams) hand, but her father warns her that she’ll come back once she’s tired of living in poverty. Barnum scrapes together a living for his wife and two daughters by working at a shipping office until the company goes bankrupt. He then gets a loan from the bank to buy a wax museum. After the wax museum fails, he decides to get together oddities from all over the city. He recruits the dwarf Tom Thumb (Sam Humphrey), the Bearded Lady Lettie Lutz (Keala Settle), plus others to be a part of his circus. Barnum then hires the rich playboy Phillip Caryle (Zac Efron) to help him establish credibility among the rich, established families. Meanwhile, Caryle quickly falls in love with the African American trapeze artist Anne Wheeler (Zendaya). The rest of the film follows Barnum as he struggles to make his circus prosperous, then once it does, how the wealth and power begins to consume him and affect his marriage. Jackman has just the right charm and charisma to play P.T. Barnum, plus he can sing and dance. Efron and Zendaya have instant chemistry, which is clearly seen in their duet “Rewrite the Stars.” Benj Pasek and Justin Paul are the masterminds behind the songs in Showman. It’s no wonder the soundtrack has been No. 1 for two weeks in a row. They’re inspiring. The film anthem, “This is Me,” sung by Tony award winner Settle, won Best Original Song at the Golden Globes. “This is Me” becomes the circus performers’ anthem as they long for acceptance. Some critics are...

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Confessions of X: the captivating new romance novel
Jan26

Confessions of X: the captivating new romance novel

The UMHB bookstore started selling Suzanne Wolfe’s novel the Confessions of X at the beginning of the spring semester and it was chosen as the book for discussion in the English Honor Societies book club, so I decided I would join in on the fun. The Confessions of X is a mix of historical fiction, Christian fiction and romance, and is an imaginative correspondent to Saint Augustine’s Confessions. The book follows the life of X, the daughter of a tile-layer and mysterious lover of Saint Augustine of Hippo. The novel paints a perfect picture of the ancient culture and is well researched despite it being historical fiction. Though we know X existed, we only know of who she was through Augustine’s Confessions and I think that Wolfe did a wonderful job keeping X vague enough to give her anonymity while still being personal enough for readers to relate with. The novel is described as “a reflection of what it means to love and lose… while deftly exploring one woman’s search for identity and happiness within very limited circumstances.” The book starts with X in her old age and we learn a lot about her life without giving too much away, but enough to leave you wanting more. In the second chapter, we start with the very beginning of her life and obtain background information, family, and beliefs before we go into the main storyline with Augustine. Readers watch X grow into a young woman, meet Augustine and start a family with him as his lover. Because of the difference in social classes, they can never marry, but knowing this, they both decide to love each other anyway. Now typically, I’m not a romantic, but I found myself rooting for a relationship I knew was bound to end but because of the way it was written, I couldn’t help myself. It was sweet to watch them fall in love and the adorable notions they made after they decided to be together. This book portrays a rare TRUE LOVE not often seen during this time period. The whole book is worded elegantly and the first few chapters need to be read slowly for the reader to fully comprehend the meaning behind the words, but after you start reading, you become more used to the style and it flows more freely off the tongue. I had a limited amount of knowledge concerning Augustine and his confessions, but I was still able to understand everything about him, their life, and the story. I enjoyed this book and would give it a 6 out of 10 at first glance, simply because I knew I...

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