The Temple Symphony String Quartet performs at the PAC
Nov10

The Temple Symphony String Quartet performs at the PAC

Amanda Schubert looks over at the other players in the The Temple Symphony String Quartet performance as she plays her viola in the Baugh Performance Hall of the Sue and Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center on Friday, Oct. 23. Her fellow players included: Sue Jacobson, 1st violin; Janet Crawford, 2nd violin; and Cory Blais, cello. Photo by Rebecca...

Read More
Movie night at Burt Pond
Oct18

Movie night at Burt Pond

Students enjoy a movie night next to Burt Pond on campus Friday night, Oct. 16. The Spanish Club sponsored the event, which offered hot chocolate and churros. At right, UMHB freshman nursing major Fatima Castillo watches as on blankets as her childhood friend Zeny Faz, at left, watches the movie on her phone so she could lie down on the lawn. Both students are form Temple, and Faz is a freshman at the University of Houston. Photo by Rebecca...

Read More
Let me help with those groceries
Oct18

Let me help with those groceries

Photo by Myia Howard Though he is not a trained service dog, six-year-old “Oreo” is so excited to have some dog food enter the house that he tries to help Xavier White get it in the door. White, who works for the Veteran Affairs Hospital in Waco, rescued Oreo when he was a teenager, at 14. Though Oreo is excited about this dog food and was ready to eat, White said Oreo also enjoys red meat, roasted chicken, and vegetables. He also loves bones. His favorite game is tug of war. *This photograph was taken in October by Myia Howard for her “Action” Assignment in her COMM 3330 Photojournalism...

Read More
Korean film “Parasite” wins big at the Oscars
Feb25

Korean film “Parasite” wins big at the Oscars

The Academy Awards have come and gone once again, but cinema has been changed forever. One can have optimism that this change is for the better. Oscar-winning director Bong Joon-ho spoke about the Oscars with disdain last year in an interview with Vulture, saying “The Oscars are not an international film festival. They’re very local.” He called the American love for his newest film “Parasite” “strange”. It is strange. American audiences don’t typically watch foreign films. Many Americans claim that they don’t have the attention span to put their phones down and appreciate the film for what it is. Bong Joon-ho also said after winning the Golden Globe for best director earlier this year “Once you overcome the one-inch-tall barrier of subtitles, you will be introduced to so many amazing films”. He couldn’t have been more right. Recently, I’ve started to go through the Criterion Channel, a streaming service of classic films. These classics include the filmography of acclaimed international directors such as Ingmar Bergman and Federico Fellini. Sadly, The Academy has never acknowledged these films. Out of the 92 years of the Academy Awards, only 13 films have been nominated for best picture that weren’t in English. Out of those, none won until this year. This is a reason to celebrate. While Bong Joon-ho never expected to win, he swept the major categories with 4 wins for “Parasite,”: Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay, Best International Film and Best Director. This type of sweep is not typical for the Academy, but much less for an international picture. As film fans, art lovers or people who just want to diversify their cultural appreciation, people everywhere can celebrate these historic wins for Bong Joon-ho and the filmmaking community. All we can do now is hope that the Academy keeps on this track and that this will encourage audiences to watch more international...

Read More

Students find new opportunities at job and internship fair

McLane Hall was filled with booths occupied by 42 companies and organizations around the Belton area on Tuesday, Oct. 1. Company representatives were looking for students from all different majors. The UMHB career services department job internship fair was to “help students and alumni find opportunities, talk with recruiters directly, and hopefully find jobs,” Assistant Director of Career Services Emily Kelly said. Kelly said she hoped that “students find work they love.” For over 20 years, UMHB has been holding job fairs. Recently, they have added internships to broaden the opportunities for students. Students were seen talking in business attire with a name tag featuring their name and major on it for company recruiters, who were willing to give jobs to anyone they saw as a good fit for their specific company. Not only was the job and internship fair a good way for students and alumni to get jobs, but it was also a great way to freshen up their interview skills. The interviews were like what you would see in speed dating, where a recruiter would be standing talking to one candidate then would move on to the next recruiter after they were done. Overall, whether the student or alumni got a job or internship they had an experience that they can carry on with them...

Read More

One Voice inspires with praise

The One Voice choral ensemble rocked the Fikes Chamber Performance Hall Oct 10- Oct 11 with music that brought its audience on an emotional joyride. The concert began in reverence with Salvator Mundi from Requiem, written by Herbert Howells. The song detailed in heart-aching, searing beauty, an expression of loss that echoed with every line throughout the performance hall. The choir sang “Save us! Help us!” tenderly as the piece concluded. Taking a few steps back in time with traditional selections such as Canticum B.Simeonis Herr, nun lässest Du Deinen Diener and Cantate Domino, by Heinrich Schütz, which were performed in the late 1500s and early 1600s carried the typical cathedral sound partial to church music of the time period. It was this sound that served as the cornerstone for choral music as a whole, even now. One Voice’s seamless performance of this very sound had the audience at a standstill; they basked in the melancholic melodies that washed over them as three soloists, James Jones, Cydney Wilkerson and Sarah Ash sang to represent the Blessed Soul of the Fallen, the Holy Spirit, and the Seraphim, while the rest of the ensemble carried on as the procession. This piece included wonderful, solemn instrumentation provided by Lisa Clement, organist and voice teacher at UMHB, Ashton Yarbrough, a student at Temple College and cellist Nathaniel Keefer, a teacher at Lamar Middle School in Temple. What was truly astounding was One Voice’s flexibility in mastering the execution of so many different styles of voice and song. Singing in order from year of release and style (from traditional to modern to something in-between at the program’s closure), the One Voice program consisted of classic choral, gospel, contemporary christian and even a funky be-doop style partial to barber shop singers in the 40s. “I auditioned for One Voice because I had heard about all the things they had performed and I wanted to be a part of their legacy,” said freshmen music education major and One Voice member, Chandler Webb. “When I auditioned for the ensemble, one of the things I told the director during my meeting with him was I wanted to grow in two ways,” Webb said. “Spiritually and musically. I feel that this ensemble has done both …for me because we have sung in so many styles that all praise God, “ Webb said. Throughout the performance, a sense of comradery could be felt in the singers as they swayed, snapped, clapped and even kazooed together. It was infectious in nature, spreading to the audience. “The thing I like the most about One Voice is we’re a family growing and worshiping...

Read More