Four men search for truth in Europe
Feb21

Four men search for truth in Europe

It was a random twitter message to Freshman Christian ministry major Ross Nesselrode that brought Will Bakke, Alex Carrol, Michael Allen and their film Beware of Christians to campus. “One of them said, ‘BOC movie,’ I saw it, thought it looked cool, so I e-mailed them and 10 minutes later Alex called me and we got it set up,” Nesselrode said. A well-attended screening Feb. 7 at Shelton theater was sponsored by the CAB office.  After showing the film, Bakke, Carrol and Allen held a Q-and-A session. Beware of Christians is the story of four young men who document their travels across Europe as they interview people on the topics of identity, materialism, poverty, church entertainment, alcohol and sexuality. The film received positive reviews from those on campus who attended. Freshman education major Mindy Lewis said, “They got to a deeper level than many people were willing to address, especially in today’s culture.” UMHB was the first venue of a tour planned by the filmmakers. Their goal is to visit campuses across America to share their film and what God has done in their lives with as many people as possible. Their hope is to get Christians who only have surface level faith to reevaluate the things they thought they knew about Christianity. “It seems like the majority of Christians in our country do what is popular or they take what their pastors say for granted.” Allen said, “They only know their ten favorite verses, and they kind of ignore less comfortable things in scripture.” The film is not without its harsh critics. Some Christians have complained that the film does not come to any conclusions. Others did not agree with all of the content or the message. The feedback and criticism from the audience has helped during the process. “It has really made me a better filmmaker to be able to talk to people and see what works and what doesn’t and what people respond to,” Bakke said. “We had a couple of test screenings in May from some pretty close friends and people I look up to, I took a lot of their criticisms into         consideration.” One reason Bakke wanted to make the movie was because he realized there were no Christian films he related to. The idea was to make a documentary for Christians, who like them, were college age and only going through the motions. “We are in a generation where Superbad is the funniest movie. For us, though, we should be able to make films that promote a good message but are still … funny,” Bakke said. While the filmmakers intended for the film...

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FBC Temple: one year after fire
Jan25

FBC Temple: one year after fire

On Jan. 19, 2010, the congregation of First Baptist Church Temple stood shocked on a still Tuesday morning as smoke billowed out from behind the remnants of the castle-like white pillars of their historic sanctuary. Now, almost one year later, it is evident that they have risen from the ashes. Provision is one thing that Pastor Dr. Martin Knox points out as having seen a lot of in the past year. “We’ve grown spiritually in seeing God’s provisions in a variety of ways,” Knox said. “We’ve seen God meet needs. … God’s provided the right things at the right time, and we’ve learned a lot about trusting God with those things.” Before the fire struck, the church had purchased property off of 2305 and Pea Ridge Road, an area closer to some of the newer residential areas of Belton and Temple. Instead of hindering the church’s move there, the blaze actually sped up the process, with the contemporary service now held there on Sundays. “The West campus is an opportunity to meet in the neighborhoods near the property that we own so that we can begin serving that area before we just build a building,” Knox said. While still maintaining the more traditional services in downtown Temple, they are also holding the West service at 9:30 a.m. and life groups at 11 a.m. on Sundays at Pirtle Elementary, and they are looking forward to reaching new areas of town with a new style of praise. “The West campus is being led by a full worship band. The style of worship is different and it was begun by folks who made a commitment to move there,” Knox said. He is also hoping that the new location will be a great fit for UMHB students because of the style and a few other perks. “The worship band is made up of UMHB students. We also have free coffee on Sundays, so that’s always nice for college students to have,” he said. The church is working on a master plan for a building on the property, estimating construction to start by the end of this year. “The congregation realized that our church was not just a building. It was truly a group of believers. No matter where we met, we are still the church,” member Cheryl Jones said. “Many stepped out of their comfort zones and learned to do church a whole new way.” Several churches, both local and far away, stepped up to support First Baptist in its time of need. A congregation farther away particularly stirred Jones’ heart. She said, “The most touching was a church we help every summer...

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New apartments to overlook creek
Jan25

New apartments to overlook creek

Last semester, the master plan to expand campus was proposed, and it didn’t take long for the first building project to begin. Construction is officially underway for the new apartments on University Drive — the first of campus housing located on the west side of the street. “We have started moving dirt to prepare,” Vice President of Student Life Dr. Bryon Weathersbee said. “You may have seen the white houses being moved across from the band practice parking lot .… that’s where they will go.” The new building is estimated to cost $7 million and will sit on 3.7 acres overlooking Nolan Creek. “If you have ever been to the president’s home and stood on his back porch, it will almost be the same view … just not with the same home cooking our first lady provides,” he said. Campus housing has been completely filled up (including the 141 beds in Garner Hall added in fall 2010). As the number of students increases each year, the need for new housing grows. Because of the new addition, 166 more students can live on campus. “Although this seems removed from campus, it is actually closer to Walton Chapel than Garner Hall is to Walton,” Weathersbee said. A variety of floor plans is available. The four-story 68,500 square foot complex will hold 59 apartment units. All will have a private room/private bath and share a common living area. Thirty-one units are for two people: two bedrooms and two baths available, eight units for three people: three bedrooms and three baths and 20 units are four bedrooms and four baths for four people. Each apartment will have a washer and dryer, microwave, refrigerator, garbage disposal, along with wi-fi, cable and data ports in each of the bedrooms and living areas. Junior  theology/philosophy and history major Tyler Potts is apprehensive of UMHB’s new addition. “I think having individual (private) bathrooms in every room is a massive inconvenience,” he said. “It takes up bed space that could be used to house more students who are usually forced out of campus housing.” Potts, however, is ready to see the campus atmosphere improve. “A lot of students are really excited about having their own bathroom,” he said. Freshman graphic design major Jacob Brenton is one of those. He thinks the private bathroom “would be nice for the women folk.” The ability to socialize, then retreat to a single room is appealing to him. “I think the possibility of living in an environment with a lot of your friends, but still having your private space is a really nice balance,” he said. This is the first step to...

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President Obama at Fort Hood

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UMHB All Access: Belton Tea Party protest

By Evan Duncan The Belton Tea (Taxed Enough Already) Party did not end with Lake Belton becoming a makeshift kettle, but Bell County protestors still made an impact at Confederate Park. An estimated 500-plus people gathered on the afternoon of tax day, April 15, to express their disapproval of the current federal spending in Washington. Signs littered the park with bold letters reading “pirates hijacked my paycheck,” “throw the bums out,” and even “secede.” The program involved prayer, multiple speakers, a sign parade, the singing of the national anthem and “God Bless America” and a symbolic toss of tea bags into a large vat. “What we have at the present time is our congressmen and our senators … not paying attention to the people who put them in office,” said Judy Brady, outreach chairman for the Republican Party of Bell County. Brady and her husband were among the speakers at the event. They dressed in colonial clothing to pay homage to the Boston Tea party of 1773 when colonists tossed taxed tea into the harbor. Brady spoke as a pair of tea bags dangled from her glasses. “They are not operating by the Constitution. They are taking away our rights …,” she said. “It is not fair for the young kids who are coming up in the world ….” The family theme was evident at the event, with many children present, holding signs and flags. One boy wore a T-shirt that read “I’m six years old and $48,000 in debt.” Another young boy held a sign that replaced the “O” in “Obama” with the old Soviet Union symbol of a hammer and sickle. Many conservatives and others fear that the increased government spending will leave today’s children footing the bill. Densel Corbin, a participant who clutched an American and a Texas flag, said, “I served in World War II in the United States Navy, and I have worked hard all my life since the time I was 9 years old, and I don’t want my children to be burdened by my current government’s spending.” Some Obama supporters braved the gathering to offer their opinion. “They really need to face the fact that for eight years they never came out and said a word, and for eight years Bush did what he did to destroy this country’s economy,” said Irene Andrews, who held a sign that read, “You are the bunch that got us in this mess.” The large crowd of Tea Party supporters fired comments at the Obama supporters. “We’ve got communists behind us!” one vocal protester shouted. “Why are there so many of us and only a few...

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Blog – Security Cameras
Apr16

Blog – Security Cameras

Please, put cameras in the parking lots outside of buildings, UMHB. My car has been hit, keyed, and vandalized without any proof of who may have done it, and I am not sure if my car can take any more. It is expensive to the school, yes, but students and faculty can reap the benefits of the extra cost by saving money on getting scratches fixed and popping dents in our doors. We deserve to know if something happens to our investments in UMHB parking lots, so that we can ask who did it rather than asking ourselves why it happened. In my two years here, I have seen other cars get damaged and have suffered hundreds of dollars worth of damage to my once brand-new car. I would be more than happy to account for the hail damage during tornado season last year, but as for the other dents and scratches in my car, I am left with a bunch of questions and no answers. Again, I plead with you UMHB. Give us some security and accountability for what goes on in our parking...

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