Finals Frenzy
Apr25

Finals Frenzy

With summer only two weeks away, students across campus find themselves rejoicing now that the only thing between them and freedom is finals. “It’s hard to believe that summer is so close. I have worked very hard this semester, and I’m ready to finish strong,” junior business management Bailey Finninger said. Although every student has finals to take, many students have unique ways that they prepare for them. Finninger uses the art of repetition by making flash cards of important terms and concepts covered in her classes and quizzing herself on them. “The process of going over my notes, making flashcards myself, and going through them multiple times helps me memorize the things I need to remember for my tests,” she said. In comparison, studying for finals started at the beginning of the semester for junior elementary education major Amanda Davis. “To prepare for my finals, I like to start off the semester strong by going to class, taking notes, and trying hard on each assignment. When I do well at the beginning of the course, it takes the pressure off having to work extra hard to barely pass,” Davis said. Since Davis has presentations and field-based projects in place of actual finals, she likes to reread chapters in her text books and make study guides of her own. “The reviews professors give are helpful, but I have found that I by making outlines of chapters on my own refreshes my memory as to what I have learned at the beginning and helps me retain what I learned more recently. Davis said. As students are using many methods to prepare for finals, sophomore marketing major Catherine Young said the best thing she can do for herself before finals is relax. “Finals are stressful for everyone. People tend to overlook basic things like sleeping well and eating right. I try to keep my normal routine during finals and then make the most of my down time by studying intensely. If I get too stressed out, I calm myself by taking a bubble bath or quick nap,” Young said. The end of the year is always a taxing time whether it is the first year of college or last year of grad school. To get through them efficiently and relatively painlessly, Young emphasizes the importance of taking care of the body and mind before anything else. “Pulling all-nighters while eating junk food is how many people think the typical student studies for finals, but there is no way a person can perform well if they aren’t taking care of themselves.” Young suggests that outside of eating healthy and sleeping adequately to...

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Students Defeat Tests
Apr25

Students Defeat Tests

Books, Scantron and number two pencils—the dreaded items that signify only one thing… tests. Although, the mere thought of examinations may send some into frenzy, many students weren’t afraid to share their preparation process for the semester farewell tests. “Definitely don’t wait until the last minute,” junior nursing major Araceli Ayala said. The statement remained a mutual tip among the students. In this case, good things do not come to those who wait. Learners recommended getting an early start to reviewing. “During finals I spend like two weeks studying straight,” junior pre-physical therapy major Jacy Mullins said. When students begin in advance, it’s easier to squeeze small study sessions into a daily routine. While getting an early start is not the latest news, students described their personal plan of action prior to final exam day. For cumulative exams, “learn the new material first, and then review the old stuff,” junior nursing major Alma Bolger said. “Always stick to the review, but skim other stuff too.” If professors take the time to create a review, most often they form questions from it, but prepare for anything. Ayala recommends asking her elders. “Usually a lot of older students will be kind and send you their old material from the class, so I’ll review that and then go back and create a blueprint how I think it should be done,” she said. In addition to professors’ reviews, students recommended making flashcards, rewriting notes or strictly reading. “Everybody studies different; just find what works for you,” Mullins said. For students who prefer group study sessions, Bolger advises reviewing the material alone before a meeting. Also, “keep study groups small,” Ayala said. Sessions tend to be more productive in groups of three to four people. If a dorm is not the ideal study spot, the campus provides students with plenty of learning space. Townsend Memorial Library offers a quiet section on the second level and areas for group study on the first floor. Nursing majors like Ayala and Bolger prefer to study in the new nursing building. “There is usually someone there who you can ask questions to,” Bolger said. Commanding students to cease the stress may seem like an ideal study tip, but it’s easier said than done. Instead, here are a few suggestions to help learners tackle any upcoming tests. Don’t procrastinate Discover your study niche—flashcards, reading, study sessions Create a to-do list with study goals Find a suitable study spot Review previous exams, reviews and material Ask questions—professors, students, parents Snack for brain power Take productive breaks—exercise, clean, read Get plenty of rest Reward yourself People have discovered their own preferences...

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Scholars’ Day will showcase research work
Apr12

Scholars’ Day will showcase research work

There is one day of the year when undergraduate and graduate students get to present their research projects. Scholars’ Day will be here Monday, April 18. In 2009, the very first event, which was created by the College of Sciences took place to allow students to demonstrate their work and encourage more of their peers to get involved in doing research. Psychology Professor Dr. Trent Terrell is serving as the chair of the event’s committee. The previous chair, Dr. Isaac Gusukuma, helped create the event along with Dean of College of Sciences and Interim Dean, College of Humanities, Dr. Darrell Watson, whom Terrell gives full credit to for making Scholars’ Day what it is today. “One of the goals of Scholars’ Day is to provide undergraduate researchers with an opportunity to present their work to others in a conference-like setting,” he said. The planning committee “hopes the experience will teach students about the process of applying to conferences and will prompt them to submit proposals to other events in the future,” Terrell said. “(They) review proposals and provide feedback  to the students.” Terrell is prepared. He has organized, collected and planned various locations around campus for hosting the event. Sessions will include different poster set ups, paper presentations, slideshows displaying art exhibits as well as “a lecture on the importance of undergraduate research from Dr. John Idoux, professor of chemistry at Tarleton State University and partner-in-residence at The Texas Bioscience Institute,” he said. All departments on campus are invited to participate in the event. The biology, chemistry, psychology, exercise and sports science, social work, graduate psychology and counseling, nursing, English, math, political science and others all have presentations prepared. For the poster session, student authors will be present from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Lord Conference Center in Parker Academic Center. Viewing times are from 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Different topics of research papers can be found in the same building, but in different classrooms. Times and locations vary throughout the day and are open to all students. Idoux’s lecture will be in Brindley Auditorium at 11 a.m. A slideshow featuring more than 40 pieces of artwork from senior art majors can be viewed between 9 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. in Lord Conference Center. Each student’s work has been exhibited in the Arla Ray Tyson Art Gallery in the past year. Terrell hopes to see many students participating. He even has an incentive. He said, “Students attending the poster or paper sessions will be eligible for a drawing to win an Amazon...

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Break given to serve

Spring break is a time for relaxation, restoration and simply getting away from the pressures of school and work. For most students, the vacation this year brought numerous opportunities to travel to countries, states and islands. The trips either benefited the community as a mission trip, provided insight for the student’s major, or provided much needed recreation. One annual trip taken over break, called Beach Reach, involved 40 students from UMHB, among 28 other collegiate ministries, going to South Padre Island to simply serve people. Led by Baptist Student Ministry Director Shawn Shannon and Assistant Director Jena Coulson, the group split into four teams and gave away free pancakes, cleaned up trash on the beach, created a sand sculpture and gave free rides to those unable to drive. Although the students and chaperones received little sleep, they enjoyed every minute of it. Freshman social work major Chelsea Owens loved the trip. “We did get to see one guy come to know Christ while giving him a ride.  It was absolutely amazing. He literally fell into our van. He was so drunk that when we were dropping another group off, he fell into the van, and we gave him a ride. He didn’t want to get off, so he just kept riding with us,” she said. As the ride progressed, so did the man’s  desire to  have a meaningful talk. “The conversation turned to Christ, and by the end of the night he had asked Jesus into his heart. To watch someone go from being broken and feeling worthless to having tears of hope and redemption stream down his face was priceless. The last thing he said to us was, ‘You know you guys really changed my life,’” she said. Many students grew on the trip spiritually and mentally. “I … want to do it next year and would definitely encourage others to go too. I learned a lot,” Sophomore biblical studies and theology/philosophy double major Will Summers said. “(Like) how even when you have no voice, energy, sleep, food, and are completely weak, you depend on God for strength.” Other students traveled on the Hope for the Hungry mission trip to Haiti. Ten students along with Assistant Director of Campus Activities Jeff  Sutton and his wife Jen went on this construction-focused trip. They worked on a mission center, roofed houses and repaired/finished the Boys’ Home in Guibert. Students also laid scripture plaques with the verse Revelation 3:20 on the Hope for the Hungry houses. The team worked on construction throughout the week, and on the last day were able to visit with the orphan boys. “They’ll definitely amaze you,” sophomore...

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Leaders change Week

For incoming freshmen, Welcome Week will be a different experience from that of previous students. The biggest change will be the new peer mentoring program. Additional changes include adding two seminars, changing the heritage scavenger hunt and giving students more free time. Interviews for mentors (Cru Leaders and tri-dubs) have been in progress for the last few weeks. Student organizations Director Kristy Brischke has been on the lookout for students who are passionate about UMHB and have good people skills to mentor new students. “The jobs of our CLs are not just to serve our Welcome Week students but also to reach out to those who did not participate,” Brischke said. Students are looking forward to being involved. Freshman nursing major Abby Thames said, “I know what kind of impact Welcome Week had on me. To have that chance before school started to get my bearings and know what was going on around me was really helpful.” It is Brischke’s goal to make Welcome Week more enjoyable for new students and increase the university’s retention rate. Brischke said, “We are hoping to get students to present projects or at least have projects around the room like the nursing students having their senior posters projects.” Other changes include a campus run before the pep rally and increased free time during the week to make it easier for students moving in and for last-minute class registration. Sophomore social work major and member of the steering committee, Mary Baucom said, “Kristy has wanted to change the face of Welcome Week for the last couple of years. She wants it to be something that continues on into the semester and about growing...

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Art contest brings big awards for students

Written by Brooke Cox The talent of UMHB’s students is not only recognized by those who travel on campus, with the recent addition of a mural and the exhibitions in Townsend Memorial Library, but their ability is shown off campus, too, with the awards to prove it. On Feb. 26, students returned to campus with awards from the distinguished Addys and Barclays. The annual Barclay Visual Arts Competition was held at the Azalee Marshall Cultural Activities Center in Temple for the 70th year of the competition, producing a record number of 218 entries. Senior art education major Alyssa Geiger won three awards: the Evelyn Foster Award of Excellence in Watercolor, the J. Bryant Reeves Scholarship Student Grand Prize and the Student Award of Excellence in Painting. Geiger plans on pursuing an MFA after graduation and encourages anyone interested in the Barclays to compete. “It is an established and well-known competition and a prestigious celebration of the arts,” she said. Geiger’s work “A Typical Day” is on display at the Cultural Arts Center in Temple until April 1. The 2010 annual American Advertising Association-Central Texas Addy Awards Competition was held at the Killeen Civic Center where students were selected for awards. Judges were advertising professionals from Oklahoma and Texas. With more than 60,000 entries nationally, the Addy Awards are the world’s largest competition. The Best of Show award and a Gold Addy went to alumnus Jordan Hall, Barbara Graham, Jimmy Davila and senior visual communications major Cari Enlow for a group project. The winning design was a product for a fictitious soft drink named Just Juice. Computer graphic design major Josh Benitez received a Silver Addy for a personal logo design titled JB. Senior visual communications major Casey Gaffney won a Silver Addy for a poster design titled Highways and Byways. Enlow also received a Silver Addy for a poster design titled Owlcity. Enlow was encouraged by her success. She said, “I never would have thought that I would win an award, much less three. It’s a very gratifying...

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