Scholars’ Day will showcase research work
Apr12

Scholars’ Day will showcase research work

There is one day of the year when undergraduate and graduate students get to present their research projects. Scholars’ Day will be here Monday, April 18. In 2009, the very first event, which was created by the College of Sciences took place to allow students to demonstrate their work and encourage more of their peers to get involved in doing research. Psychology Professor Dr. Trent Terrell is serving as the chair of the event’s committee. The previous chair, Dr. Isaac Gusukuma, helped create the event along with Dean of College of Sciences and Interim Dean, College of Humanities, Dr. Darrell Watson, whom Terrell gives full credit to for making Scholars’ Day what it is today. “One of the goals of Scholars’ Day is to provide undergraduate researchers with an opportunity to present their work to others in a conference-like setting,” he said. The planning committee “hopes the experience will teach students about the process of applying to conferences and will prompt them to submit proposals to other events in the future,” Terrell said. “(They) review proposals and provide feedback  to the students.” Terrell is prepared. He has organized, collected and planned various locations around campus for hosting the event. Sessions will include different poster set ups, paper presentations, slideshows displaying art exhibits as well as “a lecture on the importance of undergraduate research from Dr. John Idoux, professor of chemistry at Tarleton State University and partner-in-residence at The Texas Bioscience Institute,” he said. All departments on campus are invited to participate in the event. The biology, chemistry, psychology, exercise and sports science, social work, graduate psychology and counseling, nursing, English, math, political science and others all have presentations prepared. For the poster session, student authors will be present from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Lord Conference Center in Parker Academic Center. Viewing times are from 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Different topics of research papers can be found in the same building, but in different classrooms. Times and locations vary throughout the day and are open to all students. Idoux’s lecture will be in Brindley Auditorium at 11 a.m. A slideshow featuring more than 40 pieces of artwork from senior art majors can be viewed between 9 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. in Lord Conference Center. Each student’s work has been exhibited in the Arla Ray Tyson Art Gallery in the past year. Terrell hopes to see many students participating. He even has an incentive. He said, “Students attending the poster or paper sessions will be eligible for a drawing to win an Amazon...

Read More

Break given to serve

Spring break is a time for relaxation, restoration and simply getting away from the pressures of school and work. For most students, the vacation this year brought numerous opportunities to travel to countries, states and islands. The trips either benefited the community as a mission trip, provided insight for the student’s major, or provided much needed recreation. One annual trip taken over break, called Beach Reach, involved 40 students from UMHB, among 28 other collegiate ministries, going to South Padre Island to simply serve people. Led by Baptist Student Ministry Director Shawn Shannon and Assistant Director Jena Coulson, the group split into four teams and gave away free pancakes, cleaned up trash on the beach, created a sand sculpture and gave free rides to those unable to drive. Although the students and chaperones received little sleep, they enjoyed every minute of it. Freshman social work major Chelsea Owens loved the trip. “We did get to see one guy come to know Christ while giving him a ride.  It was absolutely amazing. He literally fell into our van. He was so drunk that when we were dropping another group off, he fell into the van, and we gave him a ride. He didn’t want to get off, so he just kept riding with us,” she said. As the ride progressed, so did the man’s  desire to  have a meaningful talk. “The conversation turned to Christ, and by the end of the night he had asked Jesus into his heart. To watch someone go from being broken and feeling worthless to having tears of hope and redemption stream down his face was priceless. The last thing he said to us was, ‘You know you guys really changed my life,’” she said. Many students grew on the trip spiritually and mentally. “I … want to do it next year and would definitely encourage others to go too. I learned a lot,” Sophomore biblical studies and theology/philosophy double major Will Summers said. “(Like) how even when you have no voice, energy, sleep, food, and are completely weak, you depend on God for strength.” Other students traveled on the Hope for the Hungry mission trip to Haiti. Ten students along with Assistant Director of Campus Activities Jeff  Sutton and his wife Jen went on this construction-focused trip. They worked on a mission center, roofed houses and repaired/finished the Boys’ Home in Guibert. Students also laid scripture plaques with the verse Revelation 3:20 on the Hope for the Hungry houses. The team worked on construction throughout the week, and on the last day were able to visit with the orphan boys. “They’ll definitely amaze you,” sophomore...

Read More

Leaders change Week

For incoming freshmen, Welcome Week will be a different experience from that of previous students. The biggest change will be the new peer mentoring program. Additional changes include adding two seminars, changing the heritage scavenger hunt and giving students more free time. Interviews for mentors (Cru Leaders and tri-dubs) have been in progress for the last few weeks. Student organizations Director Kristy Brischke has been on the lookout for students who are passionate about UMHB and have good people skills to mentor new students. “The jobs of our CLs are not just to serve our Welcome Week students but also to reach out to those who did not participate,” Brischke said. Students are looking forward to being involved. Freshman nursing major Abby Thames said, “I know what kind of impact Welcome Week had on me. To have that chance before school started to get my bearings and know what was going on around me was really helpful.” It is Brischke’s goal to make Welcome Week more enjoyable for new students and increase the university’s retention rate. Brischke said, “We are hoping to get students to present projects or at least have projects around the room like the nursing students having their senior posters projects.” Other changes include a campus run before the pep rally and increased free time during the week to make it easier for students moving in and for last-minute class registration. Sophomore social work major and member of the steering committee, Mary Baucom said, “Kristy has wanted to change the face of Welcome Week for the last couple of years. She wants it to be something that continues on into the semester and about growing...

Read More

Art contest brings big awards for students

Written by Brooke Cox The talent of UMHB’s students is not only recognized by those who travel on campus, with the recent addition of a mural and the exhibitions in Townsend Memorial Library, but their ability is shown off campus, too, with the awards to prove it. On Feb. 26, students returned to campus with awards from the distinguished Addys and Barclays. The annual Barclay Visual Arts Competition was held at the Azalee Marshall Cultural Activities Center in Temple for the 70th year of the competition, producing a record number of 218 entries. Senior art education major Alyssa Geiger won three awards: the Evelyn Foster Award of Excellence in Watercolor, the J. Bryant Reeves Scholarship Student Grand Prize and the Student Award of Excellence in Painting. Geiger plans on pursuing an MFA after graduation and encourages anyone interested in the Barclays to compete. “It is an established and well-known competition and a prestigious celebration of the arts,” she said. Geiger’s work “A Typical Day” is on display at the Cultural Arts Center in Temple until April 1. The 2010 annual American Advertising Association-Central Texas Addy Awards Competition was held at the Killeen Civic Center where students were selected for awards. Judges were advertising professionals from Oklahoma and Texas. With more than 60,000 entries nationally, the Addy Awards are the world’s largest competition. The Best of Show award and a Gold Addy went to alumnus Jordan Hall, Barbara Graham, Jimmy Davila and senior visual communications major Cari Enlow for a group project. The winning design was a product for a fictitious soft drink named Just Juice. Computer graphic design major Josh Benitez received a Silver Addy for a personal logo design titled JB. Senior visual communications major Casey Gaffney won a Silver Addy for a poster design titled Highways and Byways. Enlow also received a Silver Addy for a poster design titled Owlcity. Enlow was encouraged by her success. She said, “I never would have thought that I would win an award, much less three. It’s a very gratifying...

Read More
Four men search for truth in Europe
Feb21

Four men search for truth in Europe

It was a random twitter message to Freshman Christian ministry major Ross Nesselrode that brought Will Bakke, Alex Carrol, Michael Allen and their film Beware of Christians to campus. “One of them said, ‘BOC movie,’ I saw it, thought it looked cool, so I e-mailed them and 10 minutes later Alex called me and we got it set up,” Nesselrode said. A well-attended screening Feb. 7 at Shelton theater was sponsored by the CAB office.  After showing the film, Bakke, Carrol and Allen held a Q-and-A session. Beware of Christians is the story of four young men who document their travels across Europe as they interview people on the topics of identity, materialism, poverty, church entertainment, alcohol and sexuality. The film received positive reviews from those on campus who attended. Freshman education major Mindy Lewis said, “They got to a deeper level than many people were willing to address, especially in today’s culture.” UMHB was the first venue of a tour planned by the filmmakers. Their goal is to visit campuses across America to share their film and what God has done in their lives with as many people as possible. Their hope is to get Christians who only have surface level faith to reevaluate the things they thought they knew about Christianity. “It seems like the majority of Christians in our country do what is popular or they take what their pastors say for granted.” Allen said, “They only know their ten favorite verses, and they kind of ignore less comfortable things in scripture.” The film is not without its harsh critics. Some Christians have complained that the film does not come to any conclusions. Others did not agree with all of the content or the message. The feedback and criticism from the audience has helped during the process. “It has really made me a better filmmaker to be able to talk to people and see what works and what doesn’t and what people respond to,” Bakke said. “We had a couple of test screenings in May from some pretty close friends and people I look up to, I took a lot of their criticisms into         consideration.” One reason Bakke wanted to make the movie was because he realized there were no Christian films he related to. The idea was to make a documentary for Christians, who like them, were college age and only going through the motions. “We are in a generation where Superbad is the funniest movie. For us, though, we should be able to make films that promote a good message but are still … funny,” Bakke said. While the filmmakers intended for the film...

Read More
FBC Temple: one year after fire
Jan25

FBC Temple: one year after fire

On Jan. 19, 2010, the congregation of First Baptist Church Temple stood shocked on a still Tuesday morning as smoke billowed out from behind the remnants of the castle-like white pillars of their historic sanctuary. Now, almost one year later, it is evident that they have risen from the ashes. Provision is one thing that Pastor Dr. Martin Knox points out as having seen a lot of in the past year. “We’ve grown spiritually in seeing God’s provisions in a variety of ways,” Knox said. “We’ve seen God meet needs. … God’s provided the right things at the right time, and we’ve learned a lot about trusting God with those things.” Before the fire struck, the church had purchased property off of 2305 and Pea Ridge Road, an area closer to some of the newer residential areas of Belton and Temple. Instead of hindering the church’s move there, the blaze actually sped up the process, with the contemporary service now held there on Sundays. “The West campus is an opportunity to meet in the neighborhoods near the property that we own so that we can begin serving that area before we just build a building,” Knox said. While still maintaining the more traditional services in downtown Temple, they are also holding the West service at 9:30 a.m. and life groups at 11 a.m. on Sundays at Pirtle Elementary, and they are looking forward to reaching new areas of town with a new style of praise. “The West campus is being led by a full worship band. The style of worship is different and it was begun by folks who made a commitment to move there,” Knox said. He is also hoping that the new location will be a great fit for UMHB students because of the style and a few other perks. “The worship band is made up of UMHB students. We also have free coffee on Sundays, so that’s always nice for college students to have,” he said. The church is working on a master plan for a building on the property, estimating construction to start by the end of this year. “The congregation realized that our church was not just a building. It was truly a group of believers. No matter where we met, we are still the church,” member Cheryl Jones said. “Many stepped out of their comfort zones and learned to do church a whole new way.” Several churches, both local and far away, stepped up to support First Baptist in its time of need. A congregation farther away particularly stirred Jones’ heart. She said, “The most touching was a church we help every summer...

Read More