Do you want to build a snowman?
Jan29

Do you want to build a snowman?

THE BELLS — The odds weren’t very favorable. Only a 40 percent chance. But none of that mattered when the first flakes began to fall from the night sky and students filed out of their dorms and apartments, as excited as children, to see that it was, indeed, snowing. The first winter weather advisory was sent out at 9:10 a.m. Thursday by Chief of Campus Police Gary Sargent. He warned students that travel could be dangerous due to winter precipitation between 6 p.m. and noon Friday. Earlier in the day, junior exercise sport science major Daniel Villarreal placed the probability of snow behind one basketball shot on his miniature door goal. He said if he made the shot, it would snow. He made the shot but didn’t really believe. “Honestly, I doubted it was going to snow,” Villarreal said. “Maybe some ice, but I was skeptical of actual snow falling and sticking.” Perhaps he should have had more faith because around 6 p.m. the fluffy flakes were falling, and he was rushing outside like so many of his fellow Crusaders to witness the rare occurrence. Villarreal went to get his girlfriend, sophomore nursing major, Lauren Garcia. Together they walked around the campus. Students were ecstatic about the snow Thursday night, but they were even happier when they received phone calls and texts around 7:30 a.m. Friday informing them that the university would be closed, giving them a snow day. Villarreal shared his thoughts about canceled classes. “I think the best part is… another three-day weekend,” he said. “Getting to hang out with friends and enjoy the snow makes it worthwhile.” With no school and accumulation on the ground, students flocked outside in coats, scarves, ear warmers and boots Friday morning to walk across the ground that was covered with a thin layer of white. Villarreal and Garcia went for a walk across University Drive and down some trails by the creek. “The best part about having this day was… just walking around in it (snow). The sound under my boots (and) it’s just so pretty to see,” Garcia said. Sophomore education major Maegan Loya was another student that was pleasantly surprised when the winter precipitation first began. “My immediate thought was, ‘I can’t believe it happened,’” she said. “There had been other chances of snow earlier in the year but nothing happened, so for it to actually snow was just unbelievable.” Having classes canceled Friday made the event even more special for Loya, who is from Pharr, which is in the valley region of South Texas. “I was also really happy because it was always on my list to...

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Sport Spotlight: Collin Davies
Sep24

Sport Spotlight: Collin Davies

Collin Davies is a senior chemistry and Spanish major. He is from Pasadena, Texas, and was home-schooled as he grew up. Not only is Davies a student-athlete, but he also serves as the president of the student body on campus. This May, Davies will be the third of his brothers and sisters to graduate from UMHB. As well as sports, Davies is a family man. “Family has always been key in my development as an individual. I have enjoyed always being able to pour into somebody in my family, but also be mentored myself,” he said. Davies has enjoyed being a tennis player for the Crusaders. He participates in both the singles and doubles line-up. Davies has made an impact each season as a member of the Cru. “My favorite part of playing tennis is the adrenaline rush that I get when I step onto the court for a conference tennis match, especially doubles. I am really looking forward to the new conference format which we initiated this year, which allows us to play all of the teams in our conference rather than just the western division,” he said. Davies has a plan once he leaves Belton. Not knowing where he will land, but he plans to leave a Crusader legacy. Davies said, “I would love to work as an environmental analyst for an organization which seeks to end poverty here in the U.S. and in developing countries by equipping and enabling...

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Man Dead on I-35
Aug30

Man Dead on I-35

On Thursday at approximately 4:25 p.m., a pedestrian was declared dead by Belton police after being struck by a vehicle near the I-35 and US Highway 190 intersection.  

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Letter from the President: Welcome home, Crusaders
Aug27

Letter from the President: Welcome home, Crusaders

Welcome! Whether you are a new student experiencing college life for the first time, a returning upperclassman, or a graduate student back on campus after summer break, we are glad you are here. Over the summer, our faculty and staff have been praying for you, preparing for you, and anxiously awaiting your arrival. Now that you are here, we are excited to kick off the 2013-2014 school year! When you look around campus, you will notice many changes have taken place. The finishing touches are being added to Crusader Stadium, which will open with the inaugural game against Wesley College on September 21, and construction continues on the adjacent student union building set to open in January. Parking lots stand where buildings used to be, roads have been relocated, and sidewalks replaced. However, even though there are physical and structural changes taking place, the heart of Mary Hardin- Baylor remains the same through our mission of preparing students for leadership, service, and  faith-informed discernment in a global society, and vision of UMHB being the university of choice for Christian higher education in the Southwest. As we start the new semester, I would like to encourage you to get involved in the many activities available to you at UMHB. The fall semester is full of opportunities to dive deeper into the Crusader culture and experience all that campus life has to offer. Go to as many events as you are able, try new activities, enjoy your classes, and make our traditions your own. Mary Hardin-Baylor continues our commitment to grow, expand, and evolve in order to ensure that you will truly have an education for life and the experience of a lifetime. I am excited about our future here at UMHB, and excited that our future is you. Welcome home,...

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Finals Frenzy
Apr25

Finals Frenzy

With summer only two weeks away, students across campus find themselves rejoicing now that the only thing between them and freedom is finals. “It’s hard to believe that summer is so close. I have worked very hard this semester, and I’m ready to finish strong,” junior business management Bailey Finninger said. Although every student has finals to take, many students have unique ways that they prepare for them. Finninger uses the art of repetition by making flash cards of important terms and concepts covered in her classes and quizzing herself on them. “The process of going over my notes, making flashcards myself, and going through them multiple times helps me memorize the things I need to remember for my tests,” she said. In comparison, studying for finals started at the beginning of the semester for junior elementary education major Amanda Davis. “To prepare for my finals, I like to start off the semester strong by going to class, taking notes, and trying hard on each assignment. When I do well at the beginning of the course, it takes the pressure off having to work extra hard to barely pass,” Davis said. Since Davis has presentations and field-based projects in place of actual finals, she likes to reread chapters in her text books and make study guides of her own. “The reviews professors give are helpful, but I have found that I by making outlines of chapters on my own refreshes my memory as to what I have learned at the beginning and helps me retain what I learned more recently. Davis said. As students are using many methods to prepare for finals, sophomore marketing major Catherine Young said the best thing she can do for herself before finals is relax. “Finals are stressful for everyone. People tend to overlook basic things like sleeping well and eating right. I try to keep my normal routine during finals and then make the most of my down time by studying intensely. If I get too stressed out, I calm myself by taking a bubble bath or quick nap,” Young said. The end of the year is always a taxing time whether it is the first year of college or last year of grad school. To get through them efficiently and relatively painlessly, Young emphasizes the importance of taking care of the body and mind before anything else. “Pulling all-nighters while eating junk food is how many people think the typical student studies for finals, but there is no way a person can perform well if they aren’t taking care of themselves.” Young suggests that outside of eating healthy and sleeping adequately to...

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Students Defeat Tests
Apr25

Students Defeat Tests

Books, Scantron and number two pencils—the dreaded items that signify only one thing… tests. Although, the mere thought of examinations may send some into frenzy, many students weren’t afraid to share their preparation process for the semester farewell tests. “Definitely don’t wait until the last minute,” junior nursing major Araceli Ayala said. The statement remained a mutual tip among the students. In this case, good things do not come to those who wait. Learners recommended getting an early start to reviewing. “During finals I spend like two weeks studying straight,” junior pre-physical therapy major Jacy Mullins said. When students begin in advance, it’s easier to squeeze small study sessions into a daily routine. While getting an early start is not the latest news, students described their personal plan of action prior to final exam day. For cumulative exams, “learn the new material first, and then review the old stuff,” junior nursing major Alma Bolger said. “Always stick to the review, but skim other stuff too.” If professors take the time to create a review, most often they form questions from it, but prepare for anything. Ayala recommends asking her elders. “Usually a lot of older students will be kind and send you their old material from the class, so I’ll review that and then go back and create a blueprint how I think it should be done,” she said. In addition to professors’ reviews, students recommended making flashcards, rewriting notes or strictly reading. “Everybody studies different; just find what works for you,” Mullins said. For students who prefer group study sessions, Bolger advises reviewing the material alone before a meeting. Also, “keep study groups small,” Ayala said. Sessions tend to be more productive in groups of three to four people. If a dorm is not the ideal study spot, the campus provides students with plenty of learning space. Townsend Memorial Library offers a quiet section on the second level and areas for group study on the first floor. Nursing majors like Ayala and Bolger prefer to study in the new nursing building. “There is usually someone there who you can ask questions to,” Bolger said. Commanding students to cease the stress may seem like an ideal study tip, but it’s easier said than done. Instead, here are a few suggestions to help learners tackle any upcoming tests. Don’t procrastinate Discover your study niche—flashcards, reading, study sessions Create a to-do list with study goals Find a suitable study spot Review previous exams, reviews and material Ask questions—professors, students, parents Snack for brain power Take productive breaks—exercise, clean, read Get plenty of rest Reward yourself People have discovered their own preferences...

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