Dr. Joey Tabarlet: Professor and friend
Apr02

Dr. Joey Tabarlet: Professor and friend

UMHB’s Communication and Media Studies Department chair Dr. Joey Tabarlet has been inspiring students on campus since 1995. Tabarlet is also a movie buff, cat lover, dad-joke comedian and guitarist. Besides teaching, his research explores major historical events in mass media and moral depictions in film. He has also been involved with curriculum development and assessments. Tabarlet has been president of the UMHB faculty assembly and served on the Promotion and Tenure Committee, the Honors Committee and the Nominating Committee. He also founded the Central Texas Film Society. “I thought he was a very interesting professor to have,” freshman film studies major Sarah McGirk said. “He had a lot of interesting stories and real-world information that made the class easier to understand and relate to.” McGirk said that she felt challenged by the assignments he gave, and she noted that he always made sure to give feedback for improvements. Anytime she did not understand a topic, she said that he was very helpful in explaining things. “As a freshman, I found it refreshing to have a professor who treated his students like adults and let us talk and work at our own pace. While the class did require work, it felt accomplishable. I really loved having Dr. Tabarlet and hope I get to take another one of his classes sometime in my college career,” McGirk said. Tabarlet earned both his Bachelor and Master of Arts degrees from Louisiana State University. His doctorate is from Florida State University. He taught at Wesleyan College in Georgia for three years before coming to UMHB in 1995 as the chair of the Speech and Drama Department, which would later become the Department of Communication and Media Studies. Since then, Tabarlet has taught many courses including Introduction to Mass Media, Film Studies and Public Speaking. He credits his interest in the communication field to his experiences in high school and college. “I was on the speech debate team in high school and college,” Tabarlet said. “That was a turning point because that really determined what I wanted to do.” It was there that he found his love for speech and debate. “I’ve taught public speaking a lot,” Tabarlet said. “This semester is the first semester in 10 or 15 years I haven’t taught Public Speaking, so I really miss it.” Tabarlet’s colleagues are also appreciative of his contributions to the school. “I’ve worked with him for a number of years in the Honors program,” said English professor Brent Gibson. “I enjoy working with him and he’s been very helpful in the Honors Seminar. I really appreciate him as a colleague and enjoy his...

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Faculty spotlight: Brandon Skaggs
Mar20

Faculty spotlight: Brandon Skaggs

Dr. Brandon Skaggs strongly advocates getting involved in campus activities. This comes from someone who was very involved in his own student career. When he attended UMHB as an undergraduate, he was Student Body President in 2003 while being involved in multiple organizations. “Every student should be involved in some sort of co-curricular experience, because it just helps them develop as a person,” Skaggs said. Some of the other activities and organizations Skaggs was involved with while at UMHB included Welcome Week, Student Government Association and Campus Activities Board, as well as Stunt Night and Crusader Knights. Now Vice President of Student Life at the University of Mary Hardin- Baylor, he works hard to help students get involved on campus. “We want to provide students with an experience outside of the classroom that can help you grow as a leader, a businessman or woman, a teacher or a civic leader in whatever community God calls you to,” he said. Dr. Skaggs stays very involved himself, opening his home to students and hosting dinner parties for student organizations such as the Association of Black Students, among others. He attends and plans numerous student led events to ensure that everyone has a safe and good time. He has a lot of support behind him in this effort. “I have a wonderful family that is very supportive, my wife loves the ministry we were called to which is the Mary Hardin-Baylor students, and my kids love being up here as well. You cannot do this job without any of them; they are my biggest supporters,” Skaggs said. Graduating with a double major in Business Management and Computer Information Systems in 2003, Skaggs then went on to earn an MBA in Finance and Management from Tarleton State University and a Doctorate in Higher Education Leadership from Dallas Baptist University. He began his career as Director of Admissions Recruitment at DBU, which led him to work as the Associate Vice President for Student Development and Dean of Students at Oklahoma Baptist University before coming home to UMHB. It seems that he brought back to UMHB that involvement and inspiration he had as a leading undergraduate. “Working alongside Dr. Brandon Skaggs has been a delight. I see his desire to “work at all things as if working for the Lord,” Yvette Shackelford, Administrative Assistant to Dr. Skaggs, said. “He has an ability to bring out the best in everyone that works alongside him. It has been a complete joy and blessing to work alongside...

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SGA hosts debate for student body president
Feb27

SGA hosts debate for student body president

It was a quite a battle between two candidates as UMHB’s Student Government Association held its annual student body president debate on Monday, Feb. 18 in McLane Great Hall. The two students were each asked numerous questions about how they would benefit the university’s community. The night started with junior public relations major Sarah Fox and junior political science and communication major Megan Baumhardt discussing their qualifications for the position of student body president. In her speech, Baumhardt discussed how she had been in leadership positions throughout her entire life. She said that she began in 4-H, working her way up to superintendent. She also went on to discuss how she was able to earn her associate degree at a community college and became a part of officer affairs. At the end of her statement, Baumhardt concluded with, “I want to be your student body president because I have the experience to be able to lead us and bring fresh ideas to the table while still understanding the traditions of where we came from so we both can move forward and honor the past and make sure the students who are new here or feel like they’re not involved all have a voice.” Fox stated that she wants to become student body president to help others. She also described her previous leadership positions. She was a part of the Revival Steering Committee, Psalms 139, Welcome Week and Stunt Night, where she has served as class director for three years. She concluded her response by stating, “I want to be student body president for the students who have and for those who haven’t come to me and expressed their concerns. I’ve been able to serve you for the past two years as Sophomore Senator and currently the Director of Resources for SGA and I’ve loved every single bit of it.” The debate concluded with questions from students tuning in to the debate on social media. Campaigning for Student Body President began on Feb. 12. Both candidates have participated in putting strenuous amounts of hard work towards the election. Some of these efforts have involved social media campaigning, putting up flyers, and handing out goodies. Despite running against each other, both candidates have remained respectful and dignified throughout the election process, and retain a positive outlook. “I am excited for the elections,” Baumhardt said. “No matter win or lose I know that I have made an effort to represent students to the best of my ability but know that both Sarah and I want what is best for the students.” Fox had a similar sentiment regarding the hard work and rewards...

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Boxercising for fitness fun
Apr11

Boxercising for fitness fun

Although boxercise was originally founded in the UK, this popular workout method can now be found most anywhere, including Temple’s Wilson Park Recreation Center. Although boxercise was originally founded in the UK, this popular workout method can now be found most anywhere, including Temple’s Wilson Park Recreation Center. There, Lisandra Hernandez has molded her hybrid class to be a “unique blend of cardio, kickboxing, punching and body weight workout,” according to the City of Temple website.Hernandez, a five-year kickboxing veteran, said she began this class when she was training a woman who suggested starting a boxing program at the rec center. “I said, ‘yeah, why not!’ I already knew people who were interested and so they followed me here,” Hernandez said. The classes usually begin with some form of cardio, like running and jumping rope. Next, Hernandez leads her class in an intense ab and squat workout. Then the boxing begins, when Hernandez will partner up her students, one with gloves and one with mitts, and she will have students weave around cones while throwing a punch combination that is sure to make any bystander cower. Once the cardio and boxing are completed, the class ends with another run. Hernandez says that although she likes to stick to a schedule, every class is different. She enjoys bringing new exciting ideas for her students to try.One of the main reasons why she started her boxercising class was to see “how people feel afterwards,” Hernandez said. “Women feel more confident after learning these techniques and everyone gets that euphoric glow on their faces.”  One of her students, Loney Johnson, continues to come back because of the self-assurance she feels. And she is determined to keep the wardrobe she has. “I’m determined not to buy new clothes because I can finally fit in my old ones,” Johnson said.Although this class is mainly taken by women, there are a few men who are regulars, one of which is, Samuel Rodriguez, who  has been participating in Lisandra’s boxercising class for about three months now. “I hate doing the bike machine and running on treadmills for cardio,” Rodriquez said. “But here we run, jump and box. Time goes by faster here.” Not having worked out for years beforehand made it difficult for Rodriquez to keep up. However, after attending for three months, he has begun to see drastic changes. “I weighed 210 pounds when I first started and now I weigh 189 pounds,” Rodriguez said.Even if the hip, upbeat music playing isn’t enough to keep students going, Hernandez cheers them on from start to finish, leaving them with nothing but a feeling of...

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AIGA: a design club that enhances skills and networking
Apr11

AIGA: a design club that enhances skills and networking

Design is a relevant topic in this day and age. Many companies are looking for those who have strong design skills to brand their product appropriately. Getting involved in a club that suits your major is important for networking and interacting with those who share your same passions and goals. American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) is a professional organization for design and its members practice all forms of communication design, including graphic design, typography, interaction design, branding and identity. UMHB is lucky to have our very own chapter on campus that caters to those interested in graphic design or digital art. The organization’s aim is to be the standard bearer for professional ethics and practices for the design profession. The official website for AIGA states that it is the profession’s oldest and largest professional membership organization for design—with more than 70 chapters and more than 25,000 members. AIGA advances design as a professional craft, strategic advantage, and vital cultural force. The AIGA website states: “From content that defines the global practice to events that connect and catalyze, we work to enhance the value and deepen the impact of design across all disciplines on business, society, and our collective future. From design fans to the profession’s leading practitioners, AIGA members come from all backgrounds, all fields, and all levels of experience—from all around the world. Whether you’re a design enthusiast, student, freelance designer, in-house designer, design educator, design thinker, or a business owner, AIGA is here to welcome you into the wider world of design.” Recently, members of the organization came up with a logo design that resembles The Incredibles title. Chriscina Lampkin, a junior graphic design major, produced the design. She is actively involved in creating digital art. She explains that in her graphic design class, the students had to make a logo for another person. “I eventually got to do a product mockup of a tattoo ink bottle, because the guy I did the logo for was into tattoos,” Lampkin said. “AIGA has really helped me gain progress in my designs.” Alexandra Boivin is a senior fine arts major and the current president of AIGA. She is looking for someone to take the reins over the organization after she graduates in May. She has many visions for the future of AIGA. She explained that one purpose of the organization is to make and develop connections that students can have long after graduation. Boivin says it’s important to “have that crowd of people” to go back and connect with later on in your career. Any students who enjoy collaborating on art, coming up with ideas for their projects,...

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Ballroom club: A chance to dance
Apr11

Ballroom club: A chance to dance

Cru Ballroom is a new student organization focusing on getting people together to learn ballroom dancing. Club President Storm Garcia defines ballroom dancing as “partner dancing across many different cultures, countries, and types of music.” The club can teach students 32 different types of dances and features country, line, and swing dancing. Since the club is new, it currently averages 10 people who meet to dance. This club allows students to receive hands-on-help and offers new skills for all dancers, beginners and professionals alike. Garcia encourages students to attend meetings. “It’s a great way to meet people and a good way to get your mind off of school and have a good time. [Dancing] is also a very useful skill to have,” Garcia said. During each meeting, members spend time at the beginning talking and getting to know each other while waiting for more people to arrive. With the first dance of the meeting, Garcia will demonstrate the basic steps and then he’ll spend time dancing with each female dancer. Meanwhile, Vice President and senior psychology major Brook Shuck explained that members spend their time going through different dances. “Lately it’s been Swing, various forms of country dancing, and Waltz,” Shuck said. “ We usually break up categories of dance with a fun line dance. This usually gets people to relax a little,” Shuck said. “Our meetings are extremely laid back and it’s kind of like a come and go type thing.” Lauren Floyd, a freshman Christian studies major, is a member of the club. “I like ballroom dancing because it’s an expression of elegance and art that takes energy. It’s really fun when you get into it and the organization is a fun way to make friends,” Floyd said. A few more dance styles included for practice are Latin dancing, swing dancing, spot dancing, and progressive dancing. Students don’t have to worry about being good at a certain style. The club’s atmosphere is an accepting one that allows students to become more confident in their dancing abilities. “Ballroom dancing is a skill that is applicable to life, a fun way to make friends, and it’s a great workout,” Schuck said. “We’d love to see more people join Cru Ballroom, especially some guys.” The organization meets in the Mayborn aerobic room every Friday from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. For more information on how to join, students can contact Storm Garcia at...

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