UMHB Table Tennis Club brings an uncommon sport to campus
Feb21

UMHB Table Tennis Club brings an uncommon sport to campus

The university has many campus organizations that are not as well-known as others, but are still valued by students. The Table Tennis Club is one of the smaller novelty organizations here on campus. The Table Tennis club, also known as the Ping Pong Club, has been on campus for almost two years and is overseen by club president and founder Luke Hering, a senior business computer information system major. “I used to play ping pong with all my friends in McLane Hall and we thought that maybe we could get together with more people that wanted to play but didn’t have any friends to play with. It is fun because it is a way to get away from the schoolwork and into a relaxed environment,” Hering said. The Table Tennis Club meets every Friday at 5 p.m. in the Mayborn Campus Activities Center, where members play ping pong while hanging out with each other. Members describe the meetings as casual, relaxed, and entertaining all at the same time. Milana Vockovic, the club’s vice president, is a sophomore graphic design major who joined the club in the fall of 2017. “I didn’t know that the club was a thing until I was playing ping pong with my friends and I was like ‘we should start a club.’ Later, when I looked on the club roster, I found out we already had [a club], so I joined and became more involved,” Vockovic said. “It’s hard because we don’t have a lot of access to more ping pong tables and it is such a confined space. But we hope to expand in numbers and equipment.” Dr. Kaleb Heinrich is an Assistant Professor in the Biology Department who sponsors the club. “Early on I had a handful of them in lab and they had talked about getting together to play ping pong. We started meeting normally to do it and I then encouraged them to make a club,” Heinrich said. “The professional clubs are important but relative to that this club is very relaxed and very inclusive. Anyone of any level can come, we have even had staff and faculty come and play with us as well.” There are around thirty members and the meetings usually consist of two to ten people. John Swords is a sophomore business management major who comes to the club meetings often. “I was talking to Luke about tennis when Luke introduced me to the table tennis club and said I should try it out,” he said. “I enjoyed the thrill of the game and how it is fast paced, and it requires hand-eye coordination. It is a...

Read More
New organization gives students the chance to dance
Oct13

New organization gives students the chance to dance

UMHB has a number of student organizations on campus. There is at least one organization that everyone can get involved in. Impact Dance is one of the newer organizations on campus. The organization was chartered in fall of 2016 and began meeting during the spring of 2017. Shelby Rogers, a junior phycology major, who has been dancing for 17 years is a part of the new organization. “Impact Dance is for students who like to dance or would like to learn how to dance.” No matter your skill level, Impact Dance is a place where you can come to have fun and dance all your problems away. Rogers is also the organization’s chaplain. At each meeting, she leads a devotional and prayer time for all who come. The fact that this organization is also faith-centered is something special that UMHB is able to offer. Each week the group averages 10-15 people and focuses on a different types of dance, such as cha cha. “My favorite thing about Impact is the fun we have,” Rogers said. “Our meetings are full of laughter and I always leave in a better mood then when I first came in. I also just love to dance.” The group also tries to make an “impact” on the commmunity. Impact Dance dedicates time to help others. Last year, Impact Dance had a fundraiser, “Candy for a Cure” to raise money for McLane Children’s Hospital. In addition to the hospital, the organization has also raised money for the Methodist church near campus. If you are interested in dancing and want to help the community, Rogers suggests checking out Impact Dance. You can follow their Instagram @umhb_impactdance or stop by one of their meetings on Monday nights at 6 p.m. in McLane Great...

Read More
Nurses Christian Fellowship
Oct13

Nurses Christian Fellowship

Nurses Christian Fellowship is a student organization on campus that is available to nursing students who are looking for a way to get involved and take a break from the crazy hectic life of being in nursing school to spread the love of Jesus throughout campus and in the local community. “We are an organization that just wants to share the love of Christ and encourage each and every one of you,” Senior nursing student and president of the Nurses Christian Fellowship Keyarius Johnson said during the first NCF meeting of the year. “We are a very team driven organization. We work together, we don’t leave anyone behind.” Bethany Whately, historian of NCF, takes pride in her position as a board member and wants to share her love of the organization with other nursing students. “We are little people that just love Jesus,” Senior nursing student and NCF historian Bethany Whatley said. “However, we are all graduating this semester, so if you want to be a part of something, help encourage others and want to be a part of the board, let us know. “We need people to take our spots.” NCF aims to create a sense of a community among students during their journey through nursing school by supporting and encouraging one another always and lifting each other up through the whirlwind of it all. “In the past, we have had devotions where we get up in the morning, feed you guys breakfast and pray and have worship before any major exams,” Johnson said. “We know that after a long week of studying, sometimes the nerves just get the best of us so we just try to make sure you guys are relaxed and confident and just able to go in there knowing that you can do all things through Christ.” In addition to loving one another, NCF also shares the love of Jesus Christ with members of the Belton and Temple community through service. After the devastating hurricane that left many people homeless in Houston this fall, NCF sprung into action to create donation box for those that were taking shelter at the Bell County Expo Center. This is just one example of the many opportunities that NCF provides students with. “We have volunteer opportunities throughout the semester that we will let you guys know about how you all can participate in. We are trying to partner with Temple ISD this semester to try to get kind of a big sister/big brother club going to where we can volunteer with kids on the weekend and bring them to Cru football games and stuff like that. We also...

Read More
Association of Black Students hopes to unite campus
Mar08

Association of Black Students hopes to unite campus

Published in the March 8, 2017 issue of The Bells With over 60 current members in the Association of Black Students, this growing club continues to work toward one goal: to form unique and genuine relationships between all students, regardless of their ethnic background and to spread awareness of black culture throughout campus. “The Association of Black Students is a club that strives to bring the university’s diverse population as one, while also making it understandable to students what it means to be a black student on a college campus,” ABS event coordinator Nicole Ikefuna said. “It also provides an avenue for black students to interact with other races.” Ikefuna said that anyone can get involved in ABS by coming to one of the group’s meetings, paying dues, and being involved with the different events they host on campus. “There is so much to gain from becoming a member of ABS,” she said. “People can gain knowledge as to how to deal with others and be a part of a community and a family. And most of all, they can gain experiences that will help mold them into who they will become.” The coordinator said she has personally gained an understanding and love for others by being a part of the group. “I love getting to meet people from different backgrounds, and those who have been in similar situations,” she said. “I have been able to appreciate where we all come from and appreciate that we all have different views.” ABS is more than just a club, it’s a way for members to experience different cultures and gain experiences they might not have otherwise. “We put on many events throughout the semester,” Ikefuna said. “For example, with February being Black History Month, we had a keynote speaker, CJ Wilson, come and speak to us. He talked about what it means to be black and Christian. We also have many different get-together events, which are like little mixers, where all members can meet and get to know each other.” The club even has a buddy system in place, where members can find someone in the club with similar goals or someone they feel comfortable expressing their goals to. And through this partnership, they are able to hold each other accountable and make sure they are making steps toward achieving their goals. “We also have outings where we go out and do things together,” she said. “For example, a couple semesters ago we went to a STEP show and this past semester we went to the Southwestern Leadership Conference, which was a really cool experience.” The group is now working on...

Read More
Organization spotlight: Cru Film
Mar08

Organization spotlight: Cru Film

Published in the March 8, 2017 issue of The Bells Lights, Camera, Action. Cru Film is a student-led organization for students who love being in the limelight or behind-the-scenes of a production. Cru Film president, senior film studies major Oliver Ortiz, helped charter Cru Films about a year ago. “We had something similar to it back in the day, but we totally revamped it, and believe it’s going to really help film studies majors in a big way.” Cru Film is open to all students, no matter their major. “You don’t have to be a film studies major,” said sophomore journalism and film studies major Peter Zuniga said. “It’s for whoever wants to be a part of making films.” The organization’s goal is to produce a short-film every semester. This semester, they’re in the process of filming Boys, a short film written and directed by Ortiz. “Boys is a script I was writing for fun for about a year, and my professor wanted to use it so I said, ‘alright, let’s do it.’ Then I polished it up and got it film ready.” Boys will star Caleb Latson, Aaron Midkiff, Thomas Robinson, and Ben Roark as title characters Russell, Philip, James, and Tucker. “[The film is] set in the 80’s, and is about four boys who are high school friends whose curiosity often gets them into some risky situations,” Ortiz said. “When they decide to seek adventure outside the comforts of their small hometown, the uncertainty of the real world causes the boys to split, leaving one of the four to continue alone.” Once the film has been edited, Zuniga said the organization would like to have a viewing party at Grand Avenue Theater. “We’re still going to figure out how people are going to view it first, and what the event’s going to look like,” Zuniga said. “It’ll definitely be online everywhere,” he said. Ortiz says he enjoys Cru Film because students have the opportunity to learn how to work as a team and gain experience in the film industry. “I enjoy Cru Film because it gives us the opportunity to work with a crew, gain experience, and to create interesting stories that are created by the students.” Zuniga said that the organization needs students to carry on roles that will be left empty after the end of the spring semester with Ortiz graduating. “We’re making do with what we have right now, and it’s working, but we would love to have a bigger crew,” he said. “Oliver’s graduating this semester, so we’re going to need people who want to do video editing and be more involved in...

Read More

ASTRA club hopes to serve community

Published in the November 16, 2016 issue of The Bells You might be asking yourself, what is the Astra Club and what do they do? Astra Club stands for Ability Service Training Responsibility and Achievement. Astra Club has been on campus for three years and focuses on helping the community. Not only do they get involved in the community, but they are also international. One of the Astra Club’s members, junior nursing major Arissa Rosales, has been a member since her freshman year. “One of the Astra Club’s missions is to help the community, and work as a group as God wanted us to,” Rosales said. She said she enjoys the club because she has a passion to do good for the community. She loves the Astra Club because she can help in a variety of ways. One of the ways the club serves the community is by helping the organization Feed My Sheep. Feed My Sheep helps provide meals for students who rely on the free school lunch program. During winter and spring breaks Feed My Sheep packs lunches and gives them to those who do not have food at home. Rosales believes that partnering with Feed My Sheep is a way for the club to have an even larger reach. “Since joining the club, I have made lots of friends and feel a connection with everyone involved in the club,” she said. “I would love to continue with the organization after I graduate.” Junior computer science major Keznyc Walton said that one of the missions of the Astra club is to go out in the community and give back. Walton has been a part of the organization for two years and got involved when his Cru leader suggested that he join. “I love that the organization is very hands- on. I also like that there are opportunities to serve people internationally, and anyone is able to participate,” he said. One of these opportunities is the ability to send a bucket to Africa with basic necessities. He also enjoys the connection he has with everyone in the club. “Everyone is friendly and they all love giving back to the community. The organization is very low-key and that’s what I love about it.” And when they’re not giving back to the community they are hosting events here on campus. In November, the club hosted Sadie Hawkins dance in the Mclane Great Hall and the profits went to a women’s homeless shelter called The Well. Senior nursing major Ricky Sanchez, a new member of the club, was excited to be a part of it. “I wish I could’ve became a...

Read More