Where are they now- Oliver Stone
Feb08

Where are they now- Oliver Stone

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells Oliver Stone graduated from UMHB in 2015 with a degree in communications. As a Crusader, Stone was involved in Cru Football, which is what he misses most about being a student on campus. “Nothing compares to being with the boys that you go through everything with,” Stone said. “I miss being around that family.” At Stone’s job at the Cotton Patch Cafe, one of his regular customers connected him to Jamie Garrett, one of the producers at KCLN, a radio station based out of Temple. Stone, who’s affectionately called by friends as “Ozzey,” came to the station for an interview and was essentially given the job. He was learning how to produce by his first week at the station, and by his second week he was producing and reporting on sports games. That year, Stone produced all of the games for Temple High and UMHB’s 2015 football season. At the close of that season, Stone began working on “demo” CDs and sending them to Garrett, who gave encouragement and constructive criticism for his radio personality skills. By the end of summer in 2016, Stone was given the opportunity to DJ his own show, appropriately named “Operation Turn Up.” His on-air name, ‘Big O’, introduces listeners to local DJs trying to make it big. On Operation Turn Up, Stone introduces the local DJs, advertises for KCLN if they’re doing a promotion or giveaway, continues discussing DJs or other pertinent events between breaks, and then hands the show off to the next DJ, Mike D. Stone said that one of the most influential aspects of his education at UMHB was his communication practice. “Being in a studio is different from speaking live to an audience, but you still have a lot of people tuning in to what you have to say.” UMHB really helped me get comfortable with speaking in my advanced public speaking classes.” When asked why the radio personality wanted to stay in the area, he said that his primary motivation was the comfort of God’s provision. Although he originally wanted to go back to his hometown of Fort Worth and produce there, he had a feeling that he needed to be patient where he was. In the end, he understood why. “[Temple] is a smaller market, so you’re not overwhelmed by the competition. Here, I’m given the chance to grow and learn the ins and outs of the radio so that when I do decide to move elsewhere, I am multifaceted.” Although he has appreciated his time in Temple, he does hope to eventually move into a big...

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Where are they now- Randy Clayton
Feb08

Where are they now- Randy Clayton

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells Randy Clayton played for the UMHB tennis team during the 1983-1984 season. He was the captain of the team when they won the Conference Championship in a playoff game against St. Edwards. Clayton also won the Conference Singles Title during the season. In 1983-1984, UMHB was in the Big State Conference and was in the NAIA Division. Clayton received three degrees while attending UMHB: a sociology degree with a religion minor, and a Physical Education minor. Clayton graduated from UMHB in 1985 and went to get his master’s at Texas A&M University at Kingsville. There, he recieved another two degrees in sociology and psychology when he graduated in 1990. Currently, he works as a Juvenile Probation Officer (JPO). For the past seven months, he has worked in Lampasas, and previously worked for 10 years in Waco. “I got into this work in Waco when I was a Tennis Director at the family YMCA. The facility decided to take out all the tennis courts and put in a new gym and outdoor swimming pool,” he said. “They said I could stay on and direct something in the gym and pool but I decided to try something else.” Clayton says his resume consisted mostly of youth activites, and he decided to try to work with the county and maybe recieve some retirement benefits. Clayton filed many applications for different openings with the Juvenile Probation Department. “I think having a Master’s degree really helped me, and the boss was a tennis fan. I even saw him at a Baylor Bears tennis match and talked to him for a moment or two. I think that helped with me being selected to get the JPO position a few days later,” he said. The requirements for becoming a JPO include but are not limited to: at least 21 years of age; good moral character; Bachelor’s degree from accredited college or university; one year of graduate study or work experience in juvenile, criminal, social service, or related field; no disqualifying criminal history; and to never have had any type of certification revoked by lawful authority of the former TJPC or TJJD. “[UMHB] opened my eyes to a job like this. I was in the Baptist Student Union organization…but, once or twice we did some ministry at the Belton Juvenile Detention Center. I went with some students and we played guitar and did a bible study with the youth. That was my first awareness that there was a ministry for that population. I put it in the back of my mind, never thinking I might be doing...

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UNDER THE RADAR: The best groups of UMHB you may not be watching

Published in the September 28, 2016 issue of The Bells JV FOOTBAL Fans scream, the smell of popcorn floats through the air, and sweat rolls down the players’ faces. One thing’s on their mind: getting the ball to the end zone. The Cru junior varsity football has gotten off to a great start to the season as they are currently 3-0. Next Monday, the Cru will take on Wayland Baptist University in Clyde, Texas. The JV football team consists of approximately 70 players, most of them being freshmen with several sophomores. “Our young guys do a great job coming out here and going through the same practice as the varsity guys do…But then they have their chance to shine and do their thing on Monday nights,” JV head football coach Keith Mullins said. Head Coach Mullins believes that being on the junior varsity prepares younger players for the intensity of varsity ball. “The JV team prepares a player for varsity by giving him playing experience in a game type setting,” Mullins said. JV football player sophomore Exercise Science major and mathematics minor Derek Sides’ love for the game motivates him to be a better player on and off the field. “I chose to play for the Cru for the love of the game,” Sides said.  “I have a passion for sports, mainly football. Football helps me grow physically, mentally, and spiritually.” Sides believes the team has great potential for the remainder of the season. “We have so much talent and teamwork. It is more of a family rather than a team. We have the potential to do something great.”   BLACK SHIRT CRU University staff knew the Crusader Marching Band needed a change when the 28-ensemble band remained stagnant for several years due to lack of interest and time, so six years ago the Blackshirt Cru Spirit Band was born. “Our primary purpose is to support our athletic teams on the field and the basketball area,” Blackshirt Cru Spirit Band Director Nils Landsberg said. “But our main purpose during the game is to basically be the soundtrack to what’s happening on the field.” Since its switch from marching band to spirit band, the band boasts 79 members of various majors and backgrounds. “One thing that is unique about the spirit band is that we’re the largest spirit student organization on campus. And there aren’t just music majors in there,” Landsberg said. “Having the opportunity to be in front of an ensemble that is made of some many walks of life and for some many different reasons but we all have the same of making music together is just awesome.”...

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Christmas traditions: Food, family, fun
Dec08

Christmas traditions: Food, family, fun

It’s the time of year when Christmas music is inescapable, pine is in the air, and carolers are as far as the eye can see. But despite these ubiquitous traditions, holiday customs differ from place to place and family to family. In big cities like New York and Chicago, Christmas might include a visit to a stories-high, brightly-colored Christmas tree or ice skating in the center of town, while people in smaller towns might enjoy parades or tree-lightings. But, for some, family plays a bigger role in how the holidays are celebrated. Senior Christian studies major, Taylor Irby, spends the Christmas season celebrating her family’s German heritage. “We do something called the pickle tradition, and whoever finds [the pickle ornament] gets a special present and some cash,” she said. Irby’s family tradition comes from an old German custom where parents hung a pickle ornament deep inside the Christmas tree. Whoever found the ornament on Christmas Eve received an extra gift from St. Nick. The Christian studies major said the hunt for the pickle can become an intense competition. “The poor tree and ornaments have no chance,” Irby said. “We even knocked the tree over once.” While Irby and her family draw on their cultural background during their holiday traditions, others, like Shelby Halloran focus on food and family togetherness. “On Christmas Eve we put out a spread, which is an assortment of food, like crackers and cheese, summer sausage, pigs and the blanket, and other wonderful things,” she said. After they’re finished filling up on cheese and crackers, Halloran and her siblings are allowed to open one present. “This is usually done before we go to the Christmas Eve service at 11 p.m. where we spend time in worship,” Halloran said. “The service ends at midnight with everyone singing ‘Silent Night.’” Focusing on Christ during the holidays is also an important aspect of junior nursing major, Stacie Garza’s Christmas celebration. “[My family and I] drive down to Victoria, TX where we enjoy the company of extended family, share the story of Christ, and attend a service at a local church, where one of my uncles works as a preacher,” Garza said. Traveling to be with family is also a tradition for senior exercise physiology major, Morgan Tongish. “We go to my grandparent’s house on Christmas Eve, and that night we will all make cookies and listen to Elvis Presley records together,” she said. “And, even though I am currently the youngest, every grandchild still has a stocking hanging up.” That night, each stocking is filled with gifts and treats. On Christmas morning, Tongish and her family will see what...

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Homecoming week full of Cru traditions
Nov19

Homecoming week full of Cru traditions

ssert party, lemur kissing and a Crusader win. The 2015 University of Mary Hardin-Baylor homecoming week that took place Sunday. Nov. 8 through Saturday, Nov. 14, had a little something for everyone to enjoy. “Homecoming’s been fun. I was on the action committee which was interesting to be a part of. It was fun to help out with everything they needed. Set up, tear down; I was just there,” freshman nursing major Sammy Pilkington said. Throughout the week, the student organizations team gave away tanks and gift cards at various locations on campus. Some students even had to sing or answer questions to receive their prize. Students also participated in a weeklong event called The Hunt. Participants were asked to take pictures at various locations on and off campus to compete for the golden ticket. Winners of the golden ticket sat in a special balcony in Bawcom Student Union for the Cru’s game against East Texas Baptist University on Saturday. Shelby Halloran and Ryan Tyler-Coronado won the special prize. Another event, Clash of Classes, took place at the Recreation Courts on Tuesday at 9 p.m., where members from each class went head-to-head in a dodge ball competition. The sophomores took the victory. Students also took advantage of Relax and Unwind that took place on Thursday at 9 p.m. The university brought in food trucks for the first time, and Cue the Sun Band and Adam Fischer + Hunter Rea Band performed. Hot chocolate and s’mores were also available during the event. While students enjoyed refreshments, UMHB ATPE had university chaplain Dr. Loutherback kiss a lemur for Project Apple Tree. During the week, students voted with $1 tickets to choose which staff member would kiss the creature. Students could choose from Vice-President of Student Life, Dr. Byron Weathersbee, BSM Director, Dr. Shawn Shannon, or Director of Spititual Life, Dr. George Loutherback. Project Apple Tree raises money to buy school supplies for children in the Belton area. The lucky winner, was forced to put barbecue sauce on his lips before Mozzy, the lemur, kissed him. “It was unlike anything I’ve ever experienced,” Loutherback said. “The lemur was very aggressive, but it was fun. I’ve never done it before, so this is a first for me.” Stunt Night was also part of the homecoming festivites and took place on Thursday and Friday night at 7 p.m. Each class performed a ten minute skit based on the theme, vintage video games, which was chosen by the sophomore class. The freshman, who chose Pong as their game, told the story of a freshman girl, Claire, struggling between staying at UMHB or transferring to another...

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New actor emerges, aims for big success
Apr29

New actor emerges, aims for big success

Most computer science majors seek post-graduation employment as IT specialists or software developers, but not senior Johnny Riojas. In some respects, he leads a double life when it comes to preparation for his future. This year, he attends UMHB during the week, and then on the weekends, he makes the hour-and-a-half drive to College Station to take classes from his acting coach, Nikki Pederson a highly acclaimed talent scout.   While many UMHB students plan to head back to their hometowns of Houston, Dallas, Austin or a number of other Texas cities, Riojas plans to move to Los Angeles, California to take the pursuit of his dream to the next level: Hollywood.   Riojas, who was born and raised in Austin, Texas said of his childhood, “Growing up was pretty simple. I would go to school, then come home and do my homework, and then go out and hit (baseballs) with my dad in the fields.”   Baseball was a big part of his upbringing as his dad played and subsequently influenced him to. Riojas knew from a young age he either wanted to play professional baseball or act. He played all throughout grade school and college, playing for   UMHB’s baseball team for one season.   Even though he’s pursuing an acting career, he believes baseball has helped shape his character.   “I guess one of the things I learned from baseball was leadership and a strong work ethic.”   Pederson said of Riojas, “He’s a relatively new actor, but I’m very impressed with Johnny’s natural ability. He’s very funny, and has good comedic timing, but he also has the ability to be vulnerable, organic, and honest. Emotionally, he’s a generous actor.”   She also said, “I feel he has a realistic idea of the work and time it will take in order to be successful as a respected actor. The greatest asset Johnny has is his “like-ability” factor. It’s off the charts.”   Playing a minor role in 2014 film “Men, Women and Children” Riojas got the opportunity to work alongside stars like Kaitlyn Denver, Rosemarie DeWitt and Ansel Elgort.   This was a learning experience for Riojas who said of the filming process, “It was a great experience being on set and getting a feel for how the process goes.   Riojas was also a featured extra in the TV series From Dusk Till Dawn on the El Rey Network., and is currently working on his own movie Gone Astray set to be filmed in Los Angeles this summer.   He said, “I owe a lot of this to my high school friends. I was the shy...

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