Hurricane affects students
Sep15

Hurricane affects students

By Emily Mahan Contributing Writer Many students experienced hurricane damage to their homes. Sophomore Kirsten DeSpain’s home, which is located north of Houston’s city limits, was flooded. “I think that the majority of relief efforts are focused in Central Houston, but what people don’t realize is that other communities lost their homes, and it’s important to remember those towns and cities as well.” Many other students like DeSpain live outside of Houston’s city limits in smaller communities that saw the effects of the hurricane. However, much of the media coverage has been on the impact inside the city. Smaller cities that saw massive flooding include Lake Jackson, Alvin, and Freeport, which are located in Brazoria County. Evacuees of this county were sent to Bell County on buses when the flooding reached dangerous levels. Many students have volunteered to assist these evacuees who arrived in Belton, Killeen, Temple and Harker Heights. Students donated clothing, food, toiletries, and a variety of other items to Vista Community Church, who collected donations for the evacuees. In addition to dropping off donations, many students volunteered to help sort through and organize these items throughout the week after the hurricane. Some students volunteered to spend time with and prepare meals for the evacuees at local churches. UMHB junior Kelly Taylor spent time with the children staying at First Baptist Church Belton, which served as a temporary home for refugees. “Getting to play with these kids who have already lost so much and…just being able to distract them and love on them was really cool.” She developed a special bond with two little girls in particular, and enjoyed playing games with them throughout the week. “One of them was old enough to understand what was going on, but the other was too young. She was just upset that she had to wear an identification bracelet.” Taylor said that she is glad that she volunteered with the evacuees, because it gave her a chance to comfort children who had lost everything they owned. UMHB has offered to help students who were affected by the storm. Students requiring additional financial support because of the hurricane are encouraged to contact the Financial Aid office in order to discuss their situation. In addition, the school has resources available for students who need extra academic support, prayer or...

Read More
Universities hit hard by Hurricane Harvey
Sep15

Universities hit hard by Hurricane Harvey

By Dylan Jones Contributing Writer Fellow Texas universities and their campuses felt the impact of Hurricane Harvey as well. While some students may have been content with delayed classes, the affected universities were dealing with much larger problems. Joe Miller, the Director of Community Outreach at Texas A&M University Corpus Christi, said the university lost power, which included a failing backup generator. Along with losing electricity, the campus was hit with some wind and water damage. While the physical damage and long lasting effects may not have been terminal, the university faced complications involving students and faculty. “Personally I have talked to one student whose parents lost their home, and I have talked to one colleague who lived in Rockport and commuted to TAMUCC who lost everything,” Miller said. He also made note that the university instructed faculty to be flexible with students facing challenges. Miller said universities at risk of natural disasters use a common system to prepare for such an event. “When there is a crisis, we go into incident command mode.” Miller said. He adds positions like “incident commander” take presidence over positions like provost and president. TAMUCC classes were originally scheduled to begin Aug. 28, but were delayed until Sept. 5. The university is unsure of an extended semester. That decision will be made by the Texas Higher Education Coordination Board. Damage assessment teams went through campus to examine the impacts of the storm. Miller said that there was more damage to housing than classrooms and that an insurance company came through and has begun working on housing. Islander Athletics faced some hurdles as well. The girls’ soccer team had a contest in San Marcos at Texas State on Aug. 24, the day TAMUCC closed their campus. The Islanders were sent one day early and spent time in a hotel for an extra day before, and multiple days after due to the closing of the campus. The team also had to cancel a home game on Sept. 1, and an away game at Prairie View A&M was cancelled as well. Despite the damage they suffered. TAMUCC sent out UAVs to the Rockport area. The unmanned aerial systems center has been going to Rockport every day for assessments of the affected region. Having assets in the air to provide information in regards to chemical spills and damage to local officials has been a huge help for Aransas County. Many other universities have bn affected as well. Texas State, Texas A&M, University of Houston, TAMU Kingsville, Prairie View A&M, and Houston Baptist among others, have seen delays in classes and other issues around campus. “I essentially just...

Read More
Student art exhibit now open
Mar29

Student art exhibit now open

Published in the March 29, 2017 issue of The Bells The university’s art program has officially opened its doors to the annual student art exhibit. Student artists submitted 107 pieces of art and only 45 pieces of art were selected to be displayed in the gallery. Earlier this year, students were encouraged to submit up to three peices of art to be judged for display by this year’s art judge: Patrick Veerkamp. Veerkamp was an art professor for over 30 years at Southwestern University in Georgetown and recently retired. Veerkamp and a few selected jurors went through the works of art and chose the ones that are currently displayed in the gallery. The art department believes that having an outside opinion come and judge the art pieces will give students an idea of what they’ll face outside the walls of the university. Art professor Hershall Seals doubles as the Department Chair & Director for Baugh Center for the Visual Arts Art Gallery. “The quality is definitely there, and the judge chose very good works,” Seals said. Seals believes this art gallery is a good learning experience for students, and provides different experiences through the artworks displayed. Students can get a sense of validation for the work that they put into their peices and can see that it is appreciated by others. Seals said his favorite thing about hosting this event is seeing the comaraderie between the students. “They’re learning about each other’s art. Students whose works aren’t a part of the show still take part in the process, and exhibit and are encouraged to re-enter later on,” Seals said. During the contest, there were 20 students who received an honorable mention: Laura Yates, Callie Millegan, Isaac Barnhill (two awards), Erin Dona, Rebekah Brooks, Rebecca Macias, Anastasia Hale, Tori Redding (two awards), Jessica Theilacker, Samantha Juarez, Patti Cummings, Chriscina Lampkin, Madeline Hernandez, Ariana Baptiste, Ariel Davis and Courtney Vela. Rebekah Brooks won “Best of Show” for her watercolor painting “Moody, Texas Fever Dream.” Brandon Luna won third place for his set of porcelain vases entitled “Amber and Blue, Mystery and Black, Celadon and Amber.” Maria Ramos won second place for her digital painting “My traditions, heritage and culture.” And Danielle East won first place for her sculpture “An Ode to Those Who Know Why the Cage Bird Sings.” “I feel like all my work paid off and all the time I spent in college and being an art major will work out,” East said. The art gallery is filled with sculptures, drawings, paintings, photography, and much more. The gallery will be open until April 7 in the Baugh Center for...

Read More
Cru alumnus credits strong faith to UMHB
Mar08

Cru alumnus credits strong faith to UMHB

Published in the March 8, 2017 issue of The Bells Director of Development Kelly Boggs started his position in 2015, but this isn’t the first time. Boggs has become a part of the UMHB family. Boggs became a Crusader for life as a student in 1981 and graduated in 1985. Boggs double majored in Religion (now known as Christian Studies) and Sociology. After graduation he attended Southwestern Seminary in Ft. Worth. Prior to taking his position at UMHB, Boggs spent sixteen years as a pastor. “I was a pastor of three churches in Central Texas and one near Portland, Oregon.” Boggs said. He also held the position of the editor of the official news journal of the Louisiana Baptist Convention for nine years. In addition to that position, Boggs also wrote a weekly column for the Baptist Press for fourteen years. The university has given Boggs many good memories, but he said that the best memory was the day he met his wife. “We met during the summer of 1982 when she came to UMHB. Mindy was working in the Business Office located in Sanderford. I was working at a camp in east Texas that summer, but was on campus during a break,” He said, “I came in to say hi to Ms. Betty Bounds, and she introduced me to Mindy, who had just started at UMHB. The current Bursar’s Office is the exact spot where I met my wife. It is holy ground.” Boggs and his wife have been married for 30 years and have four children, one of whom is working on their masters degree at UMHB. Boggs feels so blessed for the opportunities that UMHB has given him, and being a student at the university really impacted his life. “I was a new believer when I came to UMHB,” he said, “The encouragement I received from students, faculty and staff in my walk with Christ had a huge impact on me.” One of the many people that helped shape him into the person he is was English professor Mary Long. “Long is the epitome of what I believe a Christian should be. She took time and helped me academically as well as personally. I will be forever grateful that God engineered the circumstances for me to attend UMHB so I could encounter people like Long.” One of his favorite things about UMHB is the friendships that he was able to make while in school. These friendships were not just limited to his peers, but to the faculty and staff as well. “Many of those relationships [made at UMHB] continue to this day,” Boggs said. There are...

Read More
Association of Black Students hopes to unite campus
Mar08

Association of Black Students hopes to unite campus

Published in the March 8, 2017 issue of The Bells With over 60 current members in the Association of Black Students, this growing club continues to work toward one goal: to form unique and genuine relationships between all students, regardless of their ethnic background and to spread awareness of black culture throughout campus. “The Association of Black Students is a club that strives to bring the university’s diverse population as one, while also making it understandable to students what it means to be a black student on a college campus,” ABS event coordinator Nicole Ikefuna said. “It also provides an avenue for black students to interact with other races.” Ikefuna said that anyone can get involved in ABS by coming to one of the group’s meetings, paying dues, and being involved with the different events they host on campus. “There is so much to gain from becoming a member of ABS,” she said. “People can gain knowledge as to how to deal with others and be a part of a community and a family. And most of all, they can gain experiences that will help mold them into who they will become.” The coordinator said she has personally gained an understanding and love for others by being a part of the group. “I love getting to meet people from different backgrounds, and those who have been in similar situations,” she said. “I have been able to appreciate where we all come from and appreciate that we all have different views.” ABS is more than just a club, it’s a way for members to experience different cultures and gain experiences they might not have otherwise. “We put on many events throughout the semester,” Ikefuna said. “For example, with February being Black History Month, we had a keynote speaker, CJ Wilson, come and speak to us. He talked about what it means to be black and Christian. We also have many different get-together events, which are like little mixers, where all members can meet and get to know each other.” The club even has a buddy system in place, where members can find someone in the club with similar goals or someone they feel comfortable expressing their goals to. And through this partnership, they are able to hold each other accountable and make sure they are making steps toward achieving their goals. “We also have outings where we go out and do things together,” she said. “For example, a couple semesters ago we went to a STEP show and this past semester we went to the Southwestern Leadership Conference, which was a really cool experience.” The group is now working on...

Read More
Organization spotlight: Cru Film
Mar08

Organization spotlight: Cru Film

Published in the March 8, 2017 issue of The Bells Lights, Camera, Action. Cru Film is a student-led organization for students who love being in the limelight or behind-the-scenes of a production. Cru Film president, senior film studies major Oliver Ortiz, helped charter Cru Films about a year ago. “We had something similar to it back in the day, but we totally revamped it, and believe it’s going to really help film studies majors in a big way.” Cru Film is open to all students, no matter their major. “You don’t have to be a film studies major,” said sophomore journalism and film studies major Peter Zuniga said. “It’s for whoever wants to be a part of making films.” The organization’s goal is to produce a short-film every semester. This semester, they’re in the process of filming Boys, a short film written and directed by Ortiz. “Boys is a script I was writing for fun for about a year, and my professor wanted to use it so I said, ‘alright, let’s do it.’ Then I polished it up and got it film ready.” Boys will star Caleb Latson, Aaron Midkiff, Thomas Robinson, and Ben Roark as title characters Russell, Philip, James, and Tucker. “[The film is] set in the 80’s, and is about four boys who are high school friends whose curiosity often gets them into some risky situations,” Ortiz said. “When they decide to seek adventure outside the comforts of their small hometown, the uncertainty of the real world causes the boys to split, leaving one of the four to continue alone.” Once the film has been edited, Zuniga said the organization would like to have a viewing party at Grand Avenue Theater. “We’re still going to figure out how people are going to view it first, and what the event’s going to look like,” Zuniga said. “It’ll definitely be online everywhere,” he said. Ortiz says he enjoys Cru Film because students have the opportunity to learn how to work as a team and gain experience in the film industry. “I enjoy Cru Film because it gives us the opportunity to work with a crew, gain experience, and to create interesting stories that are created by the students.” Zuniga said that the organization needs students to carry on roles that will be left empty after the end of the spring semester with Ortiz graduating. “We’re making do with what we have right now, and it’s working, but we would love to have a bigger crew,” he said. “Oliver’s graduating this semester, so we’re going to need people who want to do video editing and be more involved in...

Read More
Page 1 of 1712345...10...Last »