UMHB Crusaders win         2021 National Championship
Dec18

UMHB Crusaders win 2021 National Championship

Coach Pete Fredenburg holds the National Championship trophy for 2021 as he is greeted upon arrival back to UMHB in Belton on Saturday, Dec. 18.Photos by Rebecca McEntee The UMHB Crusaders arrived back at the UMHB field house Saturday as the 2021 National Champions for NCAA’s Division III. They won the night before, on Friday, December 17 at the Stagg Bowl in Canton, Ohio, against the North Central Illinois Cardinals, 57 to 24. North Central is the team that won the title in 2019, and because the season was cancelled last year, this was the first chance the Cru had to challenge the defending champions at the bowl. This is not UMHB’s first championship, but it may be the team and coach’s most satisfying. Wide receiver and senior Aaron Sims walks with his teammates past cheering fans after arriving back at the UMHB field house Saturday, Dec. 18. The Crusaders walk through fans to the field house at UMHB Saturday, as they are welcomed back by family, friends and fans. At left walking, and about to shake hands with a fan, is defensive back and senior Jefferson Fritz. Coach Pete Fredenburg held the trophy close as he stepped off the bus first and was greeted by family and fans. As Fredenburg carried the trophy off the bus, the team filed out after him and the tired football team walked through a cheering crowd of fans as they entered the field house. Friends, family and fans take pictures of the newly arrived 2021 National Championship Trophy outside the field house at UMHB on Saturday, Dec. 18. Outside, Belton Mayor Wayne Carpenter welcomed back the team. Then fans took photos of the trophy, set on a podium behind the speakers.  Fans had braved some rapidly changing weather with chilly winds to wait for the arrival of the team’s two busses from the airport, and to then celebrate their champions. The weather seemed to blow in just ahead of the buses with cold air from Ohio, but celebrations would...

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UMHB football takes the game from Louisiana College
Mar20

UMHB football takes the game from Louisiana College

It was a good competition but the Crusaders came away with the win against Louisiana College Saturday, March 20. The final score was 65-20. The referee hurries to get out of the way as quarterback Tommy Bowden runs by him to the end zone for a touchdown in the game with Louisiana College at Crusader Stadium Saturday, March 20. Louisiana Wildcats Logan Bremmer, at left background, and Daylon Charles, at left foreground, could only watch. Courtesy Photos The CRU’s running back Kenneth Cormier soars over a Louisiana Wildcat during the game with Louisiana College Saturday, March 20 at Crusader Stadium. UMHB’s wide receiver Kadarius Daniels, at far right, watches Cormier jump over Louisiana College’s defensive back Brandon Isaac, with Isaac’s teammate, linebacker Julius Johnson at center, also looking up at Cormier. The CRU’s cheer team supports the Crusaders in their game with Louisiana College at Crusader Stadium on Saturday, March 20. Wildcat running back Devin Briscoe is taken down by three Crusaders during the game with Louisiana College at Crusader Stadium Saturday, March 20. The Sader Bells performed at half time at the game between UMHB and Louisiana College at Crusader Stadium on Saturday, March 20. The CRU’s defensive back Jefferson Fritz fights for the ball with Louisiana College’s tight end Jacob Ganote over him in the game at Crusader Stadium on Saturday, March 20. Crusader corner back Keith Gipson assists at left foreground against Wildcat defensive lineman Micah Latin. Crusader and defensive back Drake Johnson has the ball but he eventually gets taken down by Wildcat defensive back Keyante Jett in the game with Louisiana College at Crusader Stadium Saturday, March 20. UMHB’s defensive back Drake Johnson toughs it out against Wildcat defensive back Brandon Isaac during the game with Louisiana College at Crusader Stadium Saturday, March...

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Lord Hall officially dedicated in ribbon cutting ceremony
Mar20

Lord Hall officially dedicated in ribbon cutting ceremony

This year, several freshman students have enjoyed living in Lord Hall, UMHB’s newest residence hall. On Friday, March 1, the school held a dedication and ribbon cutting ceremony to celebrate the completion of the new building, which opened in August of 2018. Attendees gathered in front of the building to hear from various speakers and celebrate the official opening of the dorm. After the ceremony, they had the opportunity to tour the building and explore eight student rooms. Lord Hall is named after Griff and Kathy Lord, Michael and Sharon Lord Daggett, and their family members. The Lord family has contributed to several other campus buildings and facilities, including Parker Academic Center, the Paul and Jane Meyer Christian Studies Center, and the Sue and Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center. In addition, Sharon Lord Daggett established the Ida Myrtle Roberts Manning Endowed Scholarship in honor of her grandmother, who attended the school in 1905. Since the scholar- ship’s establishment in 1996, it has helped over 326 students with their finances. Sophomore special education major Katelyn Blackhurst is a recipient of the scholarship. At the ceremony, she expressed her gratitude for the impact it has had on her life. “I’m beyond thankful for the Lords and this scholarship, and the fact that this incredible building is named in their honor just makes sense,” she said. “Now, whenever I pass by, I’ll remember the blessings I’ve received thanks to them.” UMHB President Randy O’Rear personally thanked the Lord family for their generous contributions to the university. “We could not be more proud to have your name on this wonderful building,” he stated to the family members. “We love you. Our university will never be the same, thanks to your generosity, and we certainly wouldn’t be the university we are today without you.” Lord Hall is not only the newest residence hall on campus, but also the largest. The 49,614 square foot building has room for 214 students. Previously, the largest freshman dorm was McLane Hall, which holds 190 students. Lord Hall is a unique residence hall due to the fact that it houses both male and female students. The two wings are separated, but share a central lobby. The building features study rooms, computer stations and two laundry rooms on each floor. A feature unique to Lord Hall is the common room on the third floor, which is equipped with a kitchen for students to...

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Showcasing students’ businesses
Sep12

Showcasing students’ businesses

College students often find themselves in need of a quick way to earn money. For some, their passions and talents drive them to create their own business. Several students here at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor share how they built their businesses and give advice on how students can start their own. Matt Murray, a senior mathematics major, started Pedagon Education in June of this year. Pedagon Education, a combination of polygon and pedagogy, is a tutoring, mentorship and consultancy business that focuses on the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics area of education. They also work on consulting with prospective students by helping them build four-year plans. Pedagon Education serves students in the Belton, Temple, Killeen and Austin areas. Tutoring subscription rates start at 25 dollars for high school students and 35 dollars for college students. The first session is always free. “I had been wanting to start the business for a while, but found myself in need of a marketing representative,” Murray said. This is where Katie Scott, a senior marketing major, comes in. Katie focuses on the social side of the business. Murray believes you need to find someone to be able to approach others online and to get your name out there. Scott recommends that if someone is looking to start their own business they should network and use social media to get their name out there and build their brand. Murray agrees that you need to find someone to show off your skills. You can get in touch with them by email, katie.scott@pedagonedu.com and matt.murray@pedagonedu.com, or phone at 254-228-9609 and 817-600-6892. And check them out on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter @PedagonEdu. Danielle Demetria East, a senior studio art major, sells her artwork on the side of earning her degree. She is a talented sculptor and also makes handmade journals and mixed media collages. When East came to college she thought this would be a good way to “jump start her career” and make a little cash on the side. Her products range anywhere from 5 dollars to 300 dollars depending on the piece. East recommends that students speak up and meet new people to network with. She advises artists to know their work and its value and not to sell themselves short. Follow her on Instagram @danielledemetria or check out her website danielledemetria.portfoliobox.net. Megan Henefield, a freshman education major, specializes in portrait, group, and live-action photography. Her business started during her sophomore year of high school. She grew up in a family of photographers, so it was natural for her to choose this profession. “I grew up in front of a camera and gradually stepped...

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Recounting alumni’s life/career path
Apr11

Recounting alumni’s life/career path

Kari Sanders (formerly known as Kari Reitmeyer) is a 2004 alumna who graduated with a degree in business administration and a minor in marketing. She attended a small Baptist high school so she knew that she wanted to attend a smaller Christian college. While attending UMHB, Sanders participated in many events and intramural sports such as football, ultimate Frisbee and softball intramurals. Sanders also went to Mexico with the School of Business to study small businesses in developing countries and ended up meeting her husband, Keith Sanders (also class of 2004) on the trip. Since graduating, she married her husband, moved to Waco and the two started an insurance agency together. They have two children Austin, 9, and Abigail, 2. Both parents both serve on the Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA) board in Waco. “I knew since high school that I wanted to be in marketing. I have done different variations of marketing at each company and I have enjoyed them all,” Kari Sanders said. “I am still very happy that I chose marketing. It was the right path for me.” After graduating, Kari Sanders began working in the advertising and sales department at Time Warner Cable in Harker Heights and transferred over to the marketing department in Waco within a year as a marketing coordinator. Afterward, she transferred to The Dwyer Group as a marketing specialist and was promoted to a brand manager focusing on national franchise marketing. After nine years at Dwyer, Sanders decided it was time to try something else and moved over to Raising Cane’s. “[As a marketing advisor,] I support restaurants by assisting with national marketing campaign coordination, negotiating collegiate and high school sponsorships, developing local marketing/community involvement strategies and much more,” Sanders said. “I am field-based, meaning I do not drive into the office in Plano every day. I work from home when I am not visiting the restaurants that I support. My territory ranges from south DFW to College Station.” Sanders explained that each project she works on takes several months of planning and grand openings are usually the biggest events she plans. When preparing to open a new restaurant, Sanders must first develop marketing plans for it, as well as coordinate any events that will take place during the opening, such as the first 100 customers receive a T-shirt, etc. Her more recent projects involved opening the Temple restaurant in 2016 and the Copperas Cove restaurant in 2017. Sanders also said that later this year a Raising Cane’s will make its grand debut in Harker...

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Student amputee shares personal struggles and accomplishments
Apr11

Student amputee shares personal struggles and accomplishments

Emily Parker describes her life beginning after her surgery to remove her leg. She described her childhood as always being in pain, never being able to keep up with her classmates, and constantly dealing with the term “disabled.” Parker was born with a genetic disease, neurofibromatosis, which caused her tibia to break when she was nine months old. Parker and her family tried to fight the disease for 10 years while enduring 14 surgeries in the process. Multiple techniques were used to heal her leg, like casts, braces, bone rods and halo devices. After the second halo device was placed, her leg did actually heal for about a year. It wasn’t until a roller skating accident that it broke again because the bone itself was so brittle and fragile. Emily said she didn’t even realize the bone had broken again because the pain was not excruciating. Emily and her mother both went to the hospital soon after where they were given two options: a third halo device implant or amputation. Emily said she remembers thinking the halo device might have worked but amputation was a definite answer to life without suffering. She knew she would have a life outside her disability. After the surgery, Parker had to learn how to walk again, as if learning how to walk for the first time in her life. As she began this new experience, reality set in. “It was like –‘Wow. This is my life now. And this is how it is going to be forever.’ ” Parker currently serves in an amputee mentorship program. She says serving new amputees is one of her biggest passions in life. When giving them advice, she points out the realization that each amputee’s life is not over, it is a new beginning. She mentioned the hardest part is coping with the fact that a physical limb is now gone from the person’s body. Amputees can look at it as cutting away the wrong that is harming their body. Another piece of advice would be to find a physical activity that the amputee is passionate about. For Parker, that was snow skiing. Snow skiing was the first physical activity she was able to try and overcome. If being an amputee has taught Parker anything, it is that she can do anything she sets her mind to. She will have to make some adjustments in certain activities, but other than minor issues, the sky is the limit. Parker definitely credits amputation as her new form of confidence. “Being an amputee has really given me a true sense of purpose and life to where I am able to...

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