Lord Hall officially dedicated in ribbon cutting ceremony
Mar20

Lord Hall officially dedicated in ribbon cutting ceremony

This year, several freshman students have enjoyed living in Lord Hall, UMHB’s newest residence hall. On Friday, March 1, the school held a dedication and ribbon cutting ceremony to celebrate the completion of the new building, which opened in August of 2018. Attendees gathered in front of the building to hear from various speakers and celebrate the official opening of the dorm. After the ceremony, they had the opportunity to tour the building and explore eight student rooms. Lord Hall is named after Griff and Kathy Lord, Michael and Sharon Lord Daggett, and their family members. The Lord family has contributed to several other campus buildings and facilities, including Parker Academic Center, the Paul and Jane Meyer Christian Studies Center, and the Sue and Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center. In addition, Sharon Lord Daggett established the Ida Myrtle Roberts Manning Endowed Scholarship in honor of her grandmother, who attended the school in 1905. Since the scholar- ship’s establishment in 1996, it has helped over 326 students with their finances. Sophomore special education major Katelyn Blackhurst is a recipient of the scholarship. At the ceremony, she expressed her gratitude for the impact it has had on her life. “I’m beyond thankful for the Lords and this scholarship, and the fact that this incredible building is named in their honor just makes sense,” she said. “Now, whenever I pass by, I’ll remember the blessings I’ve received thanks to them.” UMHB President Randy O’Rear personally thanked the Lord family for their generous contributions to the university. “We could not be more proud to have your name on this wonderful building,” he stated to the family members. “We love you. Our university will never be the same, thanks to your generosity, and we certainly wouldn’t be the university we are today without you.” Lord Hall is not only the newest residence hall on campus, but also the largest. The 49,614 square foot building has room for 214 students. Previously, the largest freshman dorm was McLane Hall, which holds 190 students. Lord Hall is a unique residence hall due to the fact that it houses both male and female students. The two wings are separated, but share a central lobby. The building features study rooms, computer stations and two laundry rooms on each floor. A feature unique to Lord Hall is the common room on the third floor, which is equipped with a kitchen for students to...

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Showcasing students’ businesses
Sep12

Showcasing students’ businesses

College students often find themselves in need of a quick way to earn money. For some, their passions and talents drive them to create their own business. Several students here at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor share how they built their businesses and give advice on how students can start their own. Matt Murray, a senior mathematics major, started Pedagon Education in June of this year. Pedagon Education, a combination of polygon and pedagogy, is a tutoring, mentorship and consultancy business that focuses on the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics area of education. They also work on consulting with prospective students by helping them build four-year plans. Pedagon Education serves students in the Belton, Temple, Killeen and Austin areas. Tutoring subscription rates start at 25 dollars for high school students and 35 dollars for college students. The first session is always free. “I had been wanting to start the business for a while, but found myself in need of a marketing representative,” Murray said. This is where Katie Scott, a senior marketing major, comes in. Katie focuses on the social side of the business. Murray believes you need to find someone to be able to approach others online and to get your name out there. Scott recommends that if someone is looking to start their own business they should network and use social media to get their name out there and build their brand. Murray agrees that you need to find someone to show off your skills. You can get in touch with them by email, katie.scott@pedagonedu.com and matt.murray@pedagonedu.com, or phone at 254-228-9609 and 817-600-6892. And check them out on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter @PedagonEdu. Danielle Demetria East, a senior studio art major, sells her artwork on the side of earning her degree. She is a talented sculptor and also makes handmade journals and mixed media collages. When East came to college she thought this would be a good way to “jump start her career” and make a little cash on the side. Her products range anywhere from 5 dollars to 300 dollars depending on the piece. East recommends that students speak up and meet new people to network with. She advises artists to know their work and its value and not to sell themselves short. Follow her on Instagram @danielledemetria or check out her website danielledemetria.portfoliobox.net. Megan Henefield, a freshman education major, specializes in portrait, group, and live-action photography. Her business started during her sophomore year of high school. She grew up in a family of photographers, so it was natural for her to choose this profession. “I grew up in front of a camera and gradually stepped...

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Recounting alumni’s life/career path
Apr11

Recounting alumni’s life/career path

Kari Sanders (formerly known as Kari Reitmeyer) is a 2004 alumna who graduated with a degree in business administration and a minor in marketing. She attended a small Baptist high school so she knew that she wanted to attend a smaller Christian college. While attending UMHB, Sanders participated in many events and intramural sports such as football, ultimate Frisbee and softball intramurals. Sanders also went to Mexico with the School of Business to study small businesses in developing countries and ended up meeting her husband, Keith Sanders (also class of 2004) on the trip. Since graduating, she married her husband, moved to Waco and the two started an insurance agency together. They have two children Austin, 9, and Abigail, 2. Both parents both serve on the Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA) board in Waco. “I knew since high school that I wanted to be in marketing. I have done different variations of marketing at each company and I have enjoyed them all,” Kari Sanders said. “I am still very happy that I chose marketing. It was the right path for me.” After graduating, Kari Sanders began working in the advertising and sales department at Time Warner Cable in Harker Heights and transferred over to the marketing department in Waco within a year as a marketing coordinator. Afterward, she transferred to The Dwyer Group as a marketing specialist and was promoted to a brand manager focusing on national franchise marketing. After nine years at Dwyer, Sanders decided it was time to try something else and moved over to Raising Cane’s. “[As a marketing advisor,] I support restaurants by assisting with national marketing campaign coordination, negotiating collegiate and high school sponsorships, developing local marketing/community involvement strategies and much more,” Sanders said. “I am field-based, meaning I do not drive into the office in Plano every day. I work from home when I am not visiting the restaurants that I support. My territory ranges from south DFW to College Station.” Sanders explained that each project she works on takes several months of planning and grand openings are usually the biggest events she plans. When preparing to open a new restaurant, Sanders must first develop marketing plans for it, as well as coordinate any events that will take place during the opening, such as the first 100 customers receive a T-shirt, etc. Her more recent projects involved opening the Temple restaurant in 2016 and the Copperas Cove restaurant in 2017. Sanders also said that later this year a Raising Cane’s will make its grand debut in Harker...

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Student amputee shares personal struggles and accomplishments
Apr11

Student amputee shares personal struggles and accomplishments

Emily Parker describes her life beginning after her surgery to remove her leg. She described her childhood as always being in pain, never being able to keep up with her classmates, and constantly dealing with the term “disabled.” Parker was born with a genetic disease, neurofibromatosis, which caused her tibia to break when she was nine months old. Parker and her family tried to fight the disease for 10 years while enduring 14 surgeries in the process. Multiple techniques were used to heal her leg, like casts, braces, bone rods and halo devices. After the second halo device was placed, her leg did actually heal for about a year. It wasn’t until a roller skating accident that it broke again because the bone itself was so brittle and fragile. Emily said she didn’t even realize the bone had broken again because the pain was not excruciating. Emily and her mother both went to the hospital soon after where they were given two options: a third halo device implant or amputation. Emily said she remembers thinking the halo device might have worked but amputation was a definite answer to life without suffering. She knew she would have a life outside her disability. After the surgery, Parker had to learn how to walk again, as if learning how to walk for the first time in her life. As she began this new experience, reality set in. “It was like –‘Wow. This is my life now. And this is how it is going to be forever.’ ” Parker currently serves in an amputee mentorship program. She says serving new amputees is one of her biggest passions in life. When giving them advice, she points out the realization that each amputee’s life is not over, it is a new beginning. She mentioned the hardest part is coping with the fact that a physical limb is now gone from the person’s body. Amputees can look at it as cutting away the wrong that is harming their body. Another piece of advice would be to find a physical activity that the amputee is passionate about. For Parker, that was snow skiing. Snow skiing was the first physical activity she was able to try and overcome. If being an amputee has taught Parker anything, it is that she can do anything she sets her mind to. She will have to make some adjustments in certain activities, but other than minor issues, the sky is the limit. Parker definitely credits amputation as her new form of confidence. “Being an amputee has really given me a true sense of purpose and life to where I am able to...

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UMHB Table Tennis Club brings an uncommon sport to campus
Feb21

UMHB Table Tennis Club brings an uncommon sport to campus

The university has many campus organizations that are not as well-known as others, but are still valued by students. The Table Tennis Club is one of the smaller novelty organizations here on campus. The Table Tennis club, also known as the Ping Pong Club, has been on campus for almost two years and is overseen by club president and founder Luke Hering, a senior business computer information system major. “I used to play ping pong with all my friends in McLane Hall and we thought that maybe we could get together with more people that wanted to play but didn’t have any friends to play with. It is fun because it is a way to get away from the schoolwork and into a relaxed environment,” Hering said. The Table Tennis Club meets every Friday at 5 p.m. in the Mayborn Campus Activities Center, where members play ping pong while hanging out with each other. Members describe the meetings as casual, relaxed, and entertaining all at the same time. Milana Vockovic, the club’s vice president, is a sophomore graphic design major who joined the club in the fall of 2017. “I didn’t know that the club was a thing until I was playing ping pong with my friends and I was like ‘we should start a club.’ Later, when I looked on the club roster, I found out we already had [a club], so I joined and became more involved,” Vockovic said. “It’s hard because we don’t have a lot of access to more ping pong tables and it is such a confined space. But we hope to expand in numbers and equipment.” Dr. Kaleb Heinrich is an Assistant Professor in the Biology Department who sponsors the club. “Early on I had a handful of them in lab and they had talked about getting together to play ping pong. We started meeting normally to do it and I then encouraged them to make a club,” Heinrich said. “The professional clubs are important but relative to that this club is very relaxed and very inclusive. Anyone of any level can come, we have even had staff and faculty come and play with us as well.” There are around thirty members and the meetings usually consist of two to ten people. John Swords is a sophomore business management major who comes to the club meetings often. “I was talking to Luke about tennis when Luke introduced me to the table tennis club and said I should try it out,” he said. “I enjoyed the thrill of the game and how it is fast paced, and it requires hand-eye coordination. It is a...

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Avery Polchinski, the back to school alum
Oct13

Avery Polchinski, the back to school alum

Avery Polchinski, class of 2016, earned his bachelor’s in marketing and his master’s degree in education from UMHB while earning accolades as a Cru basketball player. “I chose to attend UMHB not only because I wanted to play basketball there, but because it felt like home,” Polchinski said. “I can remember my first visit and I just felt like this was where I was supposed to attend college. It’s a special place filled with a lot of caring people.” It wasn’t long before Polchinski was settling in at his alma mater and playing with the Cru basketball team. He said that his time spent with his fellow players was life-changing. “It pushed me to my limits mentally and physically, and made me realize I can do things even when I think I can’t.” The alumnus said the rigors of being a disciplined player helped him manage his time better and ditch the excuses. “Everything that I have learned in basketball has prepared for me every aspect of life,” he said. “Through basketball I learned more about myself and life than the game of basketball itself.” As a freshman, Polchinski lived in the green hall of McLane in 2011. He remembers the ups and downs of being a first-year college student, and he has some words of wisdom for those who are just beginning their time at the university. “If I had any advice for a freshman it would have to be to follow the career choice that they would love doing, regardless of the money involved. No matter what it is, the path of happiness is far more important than the path of wealth.” Born and raised in Temple, Polchinski has a special connection to the central Texas community and chose to stay and teach in the area after graduating from UMHB. He currently works as a middle school math teacher and coach at Eastern Hills Middle School in Harker Heights. He finds being teacher difficult, but rewarding. “If I had to say one thing to future teachers, I would say this: treat each and every day as an opportunity to be a better teacher than you were the day before. Your students will be able to feed off of you, which will not only encourage them to do better, but it will make your classroom a better learning environment and help students thrive in school and in life.” He chose to become a teacher because he wanted to make a difference in the world. “There were many teachers that affected my life in a positive way, and I hope I can be a role model to some of...

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