Where are they now- Oliver Stone
Feb08

Where are they now- Oliver Stone

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells Oliver Stone graduated from UMHB in 2015 with a degree in communications. As a Crusader, Stone was involved in Cru Football, which is what he misses most about being a student on campus. “Nothing compares to being with the boys that you go through everything with,” Stone said. “I miss being around that family.” At Stone’s job at the Cotton Patch Cafe, one of his regular customers connected him to Jamie Garrett, one of the producers at KCLN, a radio station based out of Temple. Stone, who’s affectionately called by friends as “Ozzey,” came to the station for an interview and was essentially given the job. He was learning how to produce by his first week at the station, and by his second week he was producing and reporting on sports games. That year, Stone produced all of the games for Temple High and UMHB’s 2015 football season. At the close of that season, Stone began working on “demo” CDs and sending them to Garrett, who gave encouragement and constructive criticism for his radio personality skills. By the end of summer in 2016, Stone was given the opportunity to DJ his own show, appropriately named “Operation Turn Up.” His on-air name, ‘Big O’, introduces listeners to local DJs trying to make it big. On Operation Turn Up, Stone introduces the local DJs, advertises for KCLN if they’re doing a promotion or giveaway, continues discussing DJs or other pertinent events between breaks, and then hands the show off to the next DJ, Mike D. Stone said that one of the most influential aspects of his education at UMHB was his communication practice. “Being in a studio is different from speaking live to an audience, but you still have a lot of people tuning in to what you have to say.” UMHB really helped me get comfortable with speaking in my advanced public speaking classes.” When asked why the radio personality wanted to stay in the area, he said that his primary motivation was the comfort of God’s provision. Although he originally wanted to go back to his hometown of Fort Worth and produce there, he had a feeling that he needed to be patient where he was. In the end, he understood why. “[Temple] is a smaller market, so you’re not overwhelmed by the competition. Here, I’m given the chance to grow and learn the ins and outs of the radio so that when I do decide to move elsewhere, I am multifaceted.” Although he has appreciated his time in Temple, he does hope to eventually move into a big...

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Where are they now- Randy Clayton
Feb08

Where are they now- Randy Clayton

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells Randy Clayton played for the UMHB tennis team during the 1983-1984 season. He was the captain of the team when they won the Conference Championship in a playoff game against St. Edwards. Clayton also won the Conference Singles Title during the season. In 1983-1984, UMHB was in the Big State Conference and was in the NAIA Division. Clayton received three degrees while attending UMHB: a sociology degree with a religion minor, and a Physical Education minor. Clayton graduated from UMHB in 1985 and went to get his master’s at Texas A&M University at Kingsville. There, he recieved another two degrees in sociology and psychology when he graduated in 1990. Currently, he works as a Juvenile Probation Officer (JPO). For the past seven months, he has worked in Lampasas, and previously worked for 10 years in Waco. “I got into this work in Waco when I was a Tennis Director at the family YMCA. The facility decided to take out all the tennis courts and put in a new gym and outdoor swimming pool,” he said. “They said I could stay on and direct something in the gym and pool but I decided to try something else.” Clayton says his resume consisted mostly of youth activites, and he decided to try to work with the county and maybe recieve some retirement benefits. Clayton filed many applications for different openings with the Juvenile Probation Department. “I think having a Master’s degree really helped me, and the boss was a tennis fan. I even saw him at a Baylor Bears tennis match and talked to him for a moment or two. I think that helped with me being selected to get the JPO position a few days later,” he said. The requirements for becoming a JPO include but are not limited to: at least 21 years of age; good moral character; Bachelor’s degree from accredited college or university; one year of graduate study or work experience in juvenile, criminal, social service, or related field; no disqualifying criminal history; and to never have had any type of certification revoked by lawful authority of the former TJPC or TJJD. “[UMHB] opened my eyes to a job like this. I was in the Baptist Student Union organization…but, once or twice we did some ministry at the Belton Juvenile Detention Center. I went with some students and we played guitar and did a bible study with the youth. That was my first awareness that there was a ministry for that population. I put it in the back of my mind, never thinking I might be doing...

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Cru wins National Championship! – The Band, Cheerleaders,  and the Saderbelles
Jan25

Cru wins National Championship! – The Band, Cheerleaders, and the Saderbelles

Published in the January 25, 2017 issue of The Bells Despite long hours on a cramped bus, frigid Salem temperatures, and even a bus breaking down, the Black Shirt Cru Spirit Band, the Sader Belles, and the cheerleaders took the 20-hour bus ride to Salem, Virginia to help cheer Cru Football to the National Championship. The group left Bawcom Student Union for Salem, Virginia at 5:00 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 15. They were given the opportunity to spend Thursday night at the Gaylord Opryland Hotel before driving the rest of the way to Salem the next morning. The group even ran into some bus trouble as one of the buses carrying the Sader Belles, cheerleaders, and half the band had to pull over on the side of the road due to engine trouble. The students transferred to the fan buses for the remaining hour drive. Upon arriving at Salem Stadium, the band, cheerleaders, and Sader Belles put on a mini CRUise for ESPN, the football players, and the adoring fans. The band and Sader Belles performed a pre-game show on the field in lieu of a halftime performance. Sader Belle sophomore nursing major Amelia Enokian believes dancing at the Stagg Bowl is a memory she will treasure forever. “We were definitely honored that we were able to dance before the game since most schools don’t really take their dance teams,” she said. “I remember exiting the field, and I had smiled so much that my teeth were so dry that I couldn’t stop.” During the game, the group cheered, played stand tunes and kept the enthusiasm alive as the temperatures steadily dropped. “I was glad that we could support our team and provide the spirit necessary to lead them to victory,” senior bass drummer Music Education major Ashley Wallace said. “I had a blast getting to hang out with my friends at the Gaylord Hotel, as well as enduring the cold...

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Cru wins National Championship! – The Fans
Jan25

Cru wins National Championship! – The Fans

Published in the January 25, 2017 issue of The Bells In December, students, parents and fans alike all traveled to Salem, VA to cheer the Crusader football team to their National Championship win. These fans got to experience the game of a lifetime for any UMHB football fan. Mike McCarthy, director of the Campus Activities Board sent six buses full of students, a total of 336 fans, to help cheer on the Cru football team. Although planning for this adventure started about a week-and-a-half before the Stagg Bowl, it didn’t take long for every spot on the fan buses to be filled. The lucky fans who earned a spot on the trip received transportation, a stay at the Opryland Hotel, a ticket to the game, a t-shirt, and a spirit sign. “It was a lot of quick planning, but it was totally worth it to give that experience [of going to a national championship game] to the students,” McCarthy said. Isaac Felan, a sophomore EC-12 Physical Education major, was one of the students that was able to go to the game. He said the experience was a memorable one. “It was an experience for a lot of students; being the loudest we’ve ever been at a game, but also the coldest,” Felan said, “It was awesome to see the guys play and win.” Sharon Rately, a parent that attended the game said, it’s not every day that the “small town” guys become the heroes. “Small towns and thriving cities alike were able to be united as one to support our Crusaders,” she said. The fans that were able to attend the National Championship game cheered their hearts out for the purple and gold, even in the frigid Virginia temperatures. But most attendees said it was worth it to create lasting memories and watch their team become National Champions for the first time in the history of the UMHB football...

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Cru wins National Championship! – The Legacy
Jan25

Cru wins National Championship! – The Legacy

Published in the January 25, 2017 issue of The Bells We all have moments that we know we will remember for the rest of our lives. But when those moments coincide with the 70 men standing at your side, all working toward the same goal, it becomes something much greater. The NCAA Division III National Championship game was a special moment shared by the Cru football team that they will never forget. Unfortunately, few people will ever know the feelings and excitement of this moment. But, through the stories and recollections of those lucky enough to share the moment, those left out can try to understand. “It was great. Honestly, it was a relief, not just for me and the team but for the whole city of Belton. It was great to win one for them,” senior receiver Wykeyhe Walker said. He also shifted the glory to his defense, saying that throughout the whole game the defense was amazing and when senior linebacker Matt Cody caught that pick, he knew the team had won. “At that point I was just looking for my mom,” Walker said. “I climbed in the stands with my helmet on and everything. I was just happy.” Senior quarterback Blake Jackson said he just wants the legacy to live on forever. “For people to remember this as the team who was the first team, not only to win the first national championship, but the team that showed great brotherhood,” he said. Jackson, more than anything else, spoke of the familial feeling among the team. “That whole experience of celebrating with coaches and my brothers was a great feeling and will definitely be a memory I hold on to forever,” he said. Sophomore receiver T.J. Josey said the team really wanted to win not only for themselves, but for the past teams, alumni and the community. “The support for this team is outstanding and it was time to give back,” he said. This is a true testament to what can be accomplished when a team becomes more than just a group of teammates. This was a family, and that camaraderie carried them to the highest honor they could possibly achieve together....

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Students save lives by donating at on-campus blood drive
Jan25

Students save lives by donating at on-campus blood drive

Published in the January 25, 2017 issue of The Bells Students line up outside of the Baylor Scott & White Donor Services van, waiting to give life-giving material to those in need. Many of them are enticed into donating by a free T-shirt, free snacks, or the volunteer service hours. But most are just there to help in any way they can. While their reasons for donating vary, Julie Skoda, Baylor Scott & White Donor Services recruiter, said the healthcare system is just happy to receive these donations. “The main motivation in seeking blood donations on campus is the possibility to save two lives with every donation,” she said. Skoda is often seen by UMHB students campaigning for donations. But a large part of her job is partnering with local businesses who are willing to host blood drives. “We get a pretty good turn out here at Mary Hardin-Baylor,” Skoda said. “I usually get about 30 a day here, which is 60 pints of blood every visit.” The recruiter’s team visits UMHB twice a semester, but students don’t have to wait for a blood drive to donate. They can visit any of the Baylor Scott & White locations to be of service. Donors must be over 16-years-of-age and weigh at least 110 pounds. It’s also important that students are not planning a mission trip overseas if they want to be a donor because of some traveling restrictions associated with donating blood. Tori Pharris, sophomore public relations major and recent donor, said donating on campus is much different than when she donated during her high school years. “Here, it’s more personable,” Pharris said. “Every blood drive I walk in, and they know who I am and remember my face.” Pharris has been donating blood since her sophomore year of high school, but she doesn’t do so for the free T-shirt or a cartoon Band-Aid. “I donate because someone did it for me. When I was eight, I had open heart surgery and a blood drive was held in my name. Family and friends donated for me, so now I get the satisfaction of saving two lives every time I donate.” Although the wait can be tiring, and trypanophobia (fear of needles) is a daunting obstacle to overcome, Pharris urges students, faculty and staff to consider the pros and cons of donating. “It’s maybe an hour out of your time for someone else’s life,” she said. “You have the ability to save the world, even if your part of the world is just one...

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