Kyle Parsons wins CRU Knights 2021
Apr18

Kyle Parsons wins CRU Knights 2021

By Cole Garner Editor-In-Chief Kyle Parsons is interviewed in front of the crowd at Walton Chapel during the final round of the Crusader Knights competition on Saturday, Feb. 27. (Screen grab photo from UMHB CRU Knights video) UMHB’s annual tradition of Crusader Knights returned on Saturday, Feb. 27, in Walton Chapel. Men representing organizations and resident halls all around UMHB performed for the title of Crusader Knight. The winner, Mr. University Ambassadors Kyle Parsons, received a Crusader Knight helmet and was knighted by UMHB President Randy O’Rear. The award for best interview was given to Mr. Cru Films, Noah Sprinkle. The award for Best Spotlight was given to Mr. McLane Hall, Christopher Johnson. The award for best video and the Timothy Award winner, which is the award given to the man with the most Christ-like character, was Jacob Dellinger. The finalists of the event were Mr. First Year Collective Jackson Leedy, Mr. Delta Psi Theta Seth Brennan, Mr. Search Cru Evrhett White and Mr. Independence Village Kellen...

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Students coping with COVID

By Carrington Kelly Contributing Writer College students have felt the constant weight and entrapment of COVID-19. Undergraduates who have contracted the virus have to balance the difficulty of being a student with healing and quarantining. For a select few, they must deal with the fear of contracting the virus for a second time. There are other ways that COVID-19 has added stress into college students’ everyday lives. For some students like Gabbi Perez (year and major and where from?), the fear of being exposed to COVID-19 is terrifying but the chance of contracting the virus and spreading it is even more paralyzing. Spreading it to her family members or friends is what brings some nervousness into Perez’s life. “Being a student who has not gotten COIVD has caused some trials,” Perez said. “When it comes to dealing with feelings of exposure and knowing that I have been exposed, I am not worried about getting it, but I am worried about spreading it to others around me,” Perez said. “I don’t want to be the reason someone gets COVID-19.” Coping with pandemic-related stress is different for every student. In an article titled “Coping with COVID-19-related stress as a student” by the American Psychological Association, experts discuss best practices to deal with this special kind of stress.  The association advised to find ways to focus, look for social support, try to help other people cope, and look for ways to  manage disappointment. It was also suggested to limit media consumption, and focus on things in your control. Being a student in itself, but to be a student during a pandemic adds a whole new level of difficulty. At least one student who got COVID-19 said that because they did not have exams when they had the virus,  it was hard to get the motivation to study, even if well enough. To battle this part of their problem, hey resorted to making daily schedules in order to try to be more productive. Additional stress for all students, along with the rest of the public, was that COVID-19 has somewhat new to everyone, and we are slowly learning how it works. One of the biggest questions has been: “Can you get the virus more than once?” For UMHB student Madelyn House, the answer is yes. “Honestly, these experiences have been frustrating and chaotic in and of themselves, but to pile on school in the midst of it all was pretty difficult,” House said. “The thing that affected me the most during these times was having to turn in assignments and assessments while my health was declining.” Learning how to cope with COVID-19 as...

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The Jason Palmer Story: From Military to University Chaplain
Apr16

The Jason Palmer Story: From Military to University Chaplain

By Mindy Moore Contributing Writer The entrance to University Chaplain and Dean of Spiritual Life  Jason Palmer’s office in Bawcom Student Union. Courtesy Photos As a person walks around the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, they might see a man smiling and radiating positive energy. That man is more than likely none other than the Dean of Spiritual Life and University Chaplain Jason Palmer. Directly after high school, Palmer joined the navy, and lead services in a submarine. He also took seminary classes during his time in service. After twelve years of service in the Navy, he felt called from God to become a chaplain in the Army. He then served as an Army chaplain for 13 years. Palmer looks back on those years as a “chance to have influence in young men and women’s lives and to point them to faith.” Jason Palmer works with sophomore nursing major Emily Epps in preparation for the devotion she would be giving the following day. Palmer was going over some points from John 14 to assist Epps in structuring her remarks to fellow participants in the 82nd Annual Easter Pageant. Epps was a crowdsperson in the pageant this year. While in the Army, one of Palmer’s duties was to provide support in Fatal Incident Family Briefs (FIFB), which provides military leaders who go to families’ homes and give a detailed 4-minute report on the death of their family member while in service to the military. Families are given a choice to receive a FIFB, and they are also given a paper copy of the full report.  In January 2018, nine soldiers died in a flood vehicular accident. After completing most of the nine briefs, and emotionally drained,  Palmer got on a 29-minute flight heading from Dallas to Killeen. While on this plane, a man and his wife sat down beside him. Once the man had sat down, he quickly pulled out his iPad and started watching a women’s basketball game. Jason Palmer writes down some quick notes from John 14 to give to student Emily Epps in preparation for her devotion to fellow participants in the Easter Pageant this year. Palmer decided to start a conversation with the man, who turned out to be President Randy O’Rear. After their conversation on the plane, O’Rear had no hesitation in introducing Palmer to UMHB.  Palmer, in turn, felt God speaking to him and leading him to retire from the military. “It was not what I was expecting,” said Palmer. “But for me, obedience to God looked like submitting my request for retirement.” Palmer then went to apply for a recently opened position:  Dean of...

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A multicultural festival of fashions
Apr14

A multicultural festival of fashions

The University of Mary Hardin-Baylor’s annual Multicultural Festival celebrated its community of students, faculty and staff with a fashion show from their various cultural heritages and countries that included Congo, Kenya, Mexico, Panama, Nigeria, Spain, Togo and Zambia. The event at Bawcom Student Union on Thursday, March 25, offered music and dancing from Mexico and India, poetry of Mexico and Cuba, and cuisine that included taquitos, tostones (friend bananas), with homemade salsa and churros individually wrapped in aluminum foil single serving sheets for safe serving. They also served Mexican popsicles, Mexican Coca-Cola and water. Spanish Club Advisor Dr. Rubi Ugofsky-Méndez, said that this year’s festival exhibited an especially rich variety of fashions in their fashion show, in which each participant was introduced by Cynthia Tryon. Participants pictured left to right, and the countries they are representing are: Michael Davis (Togo and Kenya), Neisha Hickman (Kenya), Morgan Chambers (Nigeria and West Africa), Reagan Williams (Nigeria), Kate Melton (Panama), Gilda Tchao (Togo), Rosine Muhorakeye (Congo and Zambia), Kassandra Portillo (Mexico), Jennifer Medina (Spain), Dr Rubi Ugofsky-Méndez (Spain), Kanishka Upreti (India) and Jasmine Thompson (Kenya).Photo by J.D....

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“He is Risen” billboard on I-35
Apr14

“He is Risen” billboard on I-35

The billboard sign on Interstate 35 changed from “Cru Country” to “He is Risen” just before Easter. The UMHB-featured board is just before the Bell County line going north on I-35, and at the Hill Road and #279 exit ramp. Courtesy Photo...

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Annual Easter Pageant brings tradition back to old and new audience members
Apr13

Annual Easter Pageant brings tradition back to old and new audience members

By Cole Garner Editor in Chief Jesus, played by Steve Villalobos, waves back as he enters Jerusalem with welcoming crowds waving heir palm leaves in the Easter Pageant at UMHB on Wednesday, March 31. Garrett Snyder walks the donkey, Honey, as Dylan Yates, playing a Roman Guard, walks to the left. Courtesy Photos This year saw the return of the UMHB Easter Pageant in person for its 82nd year. Enthusiastic audiences filled the stands and lawn at Luther Memorial on campus, for three performances on Wednesday, March 31, with the first starting at 12:30 p.m. and the last at  5:30 p.m.. Crowdspeople, played by Jamie Boykin (left), Precious Anselm (middle left), Jordan McCaslin (middle right) and Dannah Fritschle (right) greet other women during the play. Last year, the 81st UMHB Easter Pageant was moved online when the COVID-19 pandemic forced students to go home to complete the spring semester online. Because of this, the pageant was completely different from previous iterations, as it was presented as an edited version. Students sent in videos of themselves talking about their experiences of past pageants. Videos of pageants of years past also were presented during the broadcast. Jesus, played by Steve Villalobos, tells the Penitent Thief at right, who is played by sophomore math major Seth Brennan, that he will be with Him in Paradise that day. The Roman guards are played by Thomas Henderson (left) and Phil Cagle (right). This year’s third performance of the afternoon  began with UMHB President Randy O’Rear opening up the final performance with comments and prayer. He was accompanied by pageant directors Miriam Osterlund and Sarah Weinmann. UMHB President Randy O’Rear leads the audience in prayer at the beginning of the 5:30 p.m. performance of the university’s annual Easter Pageant. O’Rear spoke highly of the event, calling it his favorite UMHB tradition. He then sat and held his grandson as he watched it with his family. All disciples are chosen personally by the actor for Jesus, who was played by senior psychology major Steve Villalobos. Jesus, played by Steve Villalobos, shows that he has risen from the tomb. This year, freshman public relations major Chris Johnson was picked to be one of the disciples. Johnson said that experiencing being a disciple as a freshman was important to him. “God has grown me as a person so much and having experienced [the Easter pageant] so vividly as a freshman was amazing,” Johnson said. He claimed that his favorite experience during the production of the pageant was getting to know the other 11 disciples. “I loved getting to know them all better and I know I have made...

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