Hunter Rae Band  steals the show during  downtown performance
Aug23

Hunter Rae Band steals the show during downtown performance

Hunter Glaskae of the Hunter Rea Band performed an acoustic set of original songs from his new album Lovin’ Ain’t Free at the Gin complex Friday evening. His three-hour show included a series of blues-rock songs, personal anecdotes, and a five-minute break to hold a parrot brought in by an audience member. The full-length album’s release is the realization of a big dream for the band. “It’s always been our goal [to release an album],” Glaskae said. “Since its release, we’ve gotten some really good feedback and have gotten connected with a lot of good people.” The band’s music focuses heavily on three aspects: songwriting, making an impact for the Kingdom and creating a soulful sound. “We are a Christian-based band and the most important thing for us is our Christian identity,” he said. Their shared faith has been a consistent cornerstone of the Hunter Rea band since its inception in 2009. Glaskae and bandmate Adam Rea met at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor playing football. The pair’s career in music launched as they played various events for the university as well as around Waco and Belton. “[UMHB] gave us a lot of good opportunities,” Glaskae said. “Now, anytime we get to come back and play for UMHB, [we] love doing that.” Eventually the two members quit football to pursue their band’s dream, and added three other band members to complete their five-person band. Glaskae, who graduated with an international business degree, decided to pursue music full-time when he realized he didn’t feel quite right in corporate America. “I recently left my job at McLane Company,” he said. “I felt like the Lord was telling me to move. I felt like [He] was telling me to pursue some different goals and dreams.” Up next for the band is a radio tour around Texas and surrounding states, beginning in West Texas on Wednesday. The traveling tour will consist of a series of interviews with local country radio stations and will take them throughout Oklahoma and Kansas as well as Texas. “My greatest advice is to get out there and sound horrible,” Glaskae said. “I think the greatest thing is just to go out and be yourself and don’t let anybody change you.” Glaskae mentioned that their first few shows were full of missteps. “We were horrible. We weren’t seasoned musicians. We just threw together what we could,” he said. “As a matter of fact, my mic fell off the stage because the stage was so rocky. I asked an audience member, ‘would you mind putting that back there?’” Despite malfunctions of all kinds on stage, Glaskae and the Hunter Rea...

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Unique summer internships provide students with meaningful experiences
Aug23

Unique summer internships provide students with meaningful experiences

For many, summer is a time to relax, hang out with friends, and perhaps most importantly, have a job to pay for college or gain experience for future employment. Internships are a great way to gain insight about the world and showcase skills that are needed in various places. They can also help you understand more about your intended major and prepare you for a fulfilling career. Numerous students at the university had the opportunity this summer to use their talents to serve God by being interns. Jordyn Brinkman, a sophomore interdisciplinary major, knows this firsthand. “My internship this summer was at a church. The Lakeway church to be specific,” she said. “While there, I worked in the children’s ministry department.” Brinkman had a variety of duties, such as prepping and working for Vacation Bible School, leading a group of kids at a four-day camp in Denton, Texas called Camp Kid Jam, and planning and organizing events for the department. The work was rewarding because of the relationships she made with her co-workers and the children at the church. “I just really enjoyed being in the presence of children throughout the summer. In the future, I want to be a teacher, so children are my passion.” Brinkman said. Not only did she form relationships, but she also grew as an individual, preparing her for the road to becoming a teacher and leader. “I felt like I improved on patience the most. Children, although brilliant, really know how to test you sometimes,” Brinkman said. “I think that the most valuable thing I learned this summer was leadership as well as being a team player.” “There were three other interns that I worked with this summer who taught me how to communicate and work together to achieve the same goal. The kids pushed me to step out of my comfort zone and lead them not only in their daily activities, but also in their walk with God.” Samuel Kinnin, a junior Christian studies/public relations major, had a gratifying internship experience as well. He worked with Impact Student Ministries, a national Pentecostal organization that helps children grow in their walk with Christ. “I went to church camps with a team to speak, lead games, and sometimes served as a counselor.” Kinnin said. “I also was constantly posting on social media and created a blog to share the internship with people all over the world.” Kinnin was able to spread God’s Word to many people, as he traveled to six states and met with individuals who needed to hear about Jesus’ love. “God worked wonders in the lives of so many,” Kinnin said....

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PAC almost finished: Faculty prepares for art performances
Aug23

PAC almost finished: Faculty prepares for art performances

In the spring semester of 2017, ground was broken to make way for a new Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center on campus. Now, construction on the building is close to being finished and performances are being planned. The building is quickly becoming the new pride and joy of many and after $20 million, months of hard work, and seeing the building’s result, it is easy to see why. The new Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center will be able to seat up to 546 people in the performance hall, which is 246 more than the 300 seats in the Hughes performance hall. This new feature on campus will bring students live cinema, plus it will be equipped with a spacious lobby and a box office with a walk-up window. The Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center will also hold classes for students looking to broaden their performing skills. “We don’t have an official date for the dedication ceremony at this time, but it will be in October. At that event, which will be open to the public, there will be a ribbon cutting and tours of the facility,” James Stafford, Director of marketing and Public Relations, told Belton journal during an interview. Director of Operations & Technical Director for the Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center, Erik Vose, believes the new addition to campus will be extremely beneficial and will open more options for the College of Visual and Performing Arts to offer the student body. Shyanne Hoffman, a freshman forensics major with a music minor, says she is excited for the new opportunities the building and the class will have in store for her. “I think it’s going to be a great addition to UMHB and I’m excited to see what amazing things it has to offer.” Hoffman said. Freshman music education major, Makaila Showels, believes the newest addition to campus will be able to give her a new sense of responsibility. “I am very excited. I never had a chance to perform or work in a brand new Performing Arts building. “This building will provide music and performance students with a professional level performance space that will help them gain better experience as performers,” Vose said. “The rest of the student body will also have a beautiful new venue to visit for their Fine Arts Experience credits. Hopefully, they will enjoy the experience enough to come back even when they don’t need credit.” The Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center is the last project of the 2011 Campus Master Plan and will pave the way for more innovative plans to...

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Welcome Week 2017
Aug23

Welcome Week 2017

Every year, freshmen get the opportunity to move in the week before classes to experience Welcome Week. During Welcome Week, students take part in the Spirit and Traditions rally, where they learn about UMHB traditions, and have an opportunity to run onto the field at Crusader Stadium. Welcome Week participants also compete in Color Games, and they are introduced to different organizations on campus at the Student Organization Fair. At the end of the week, students are dubbed ‘Crusaders for Life’ in candlelight at Luther Memorial. See photo gallery for more Welcome Week...

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Bells staff wins awards at TIPA competition
Apr26

Bells staff wins awards at TIPA competition

The Bells staff recently attended the annual Texas Intercollegiate Press Association conference in Dallas. The staff competed in on-site contests and came home with several awards for articles and page designs from 2016. Individual awards: – Honorable mention, sports news story: Cody Weems – 3rd place, sports action photo: Jake Stamps – 1st place, picture story: Madeline Oden, Lauren Lum, Kaylee Blumenfeld, Tra Shedrick – 2nd place, special edition: Lauren Lum – Honorable mention, single subject presentation: Geri Wissink and Tori Van Hooser – 3rd place, feature story: Tori Van Hooser – 3rd place, illustration: Sarah Ifft – 1st place, headline: Madeline Oden – Honorable mention, general column: Lauren Lum – Honorable mention, infographic: Tori Van Hooser and Geri Wissink – Honorable mention, feature photo: Alex Boivin Staff awards: – Honorable mention, overall excellence – 2nd place, Best of...

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Tips for seniors looking for dream job
Apr26

Tips for seniors looking for dream job

Published in the April 26, 2017 issue of The Bells Graduation is only two short weeks away. The invitations have been sent out, senior pictures have been taken and caps have been decorated. So, what’s next after the long and highly anticipated day most seniors work four years (or sometimes longer) to reach? For most seniors, unless they’re headed to graduate school, it’s time to look for a job. While this may seem like a daunting task, Director of Career Services Don Owens, has several helpful tips for seniors to get that dream job. 1. Present yourself in every application process in a professional way. Owens stresses that job applicants should fill out every line on a job application even if the student doesn’t have an exact answer. Not applicable is better than a blank line. 2 Be sure your resume is targeted to that particular job. Owens suggests reviewing the company’s website, and to be sure and include keywords from the job description into your resume. “Most applications are online. [Companies] have systems that will scan resumes, and you get points for every word you have in your resume that’s in the job description.” 3. Do not undersell yourself. “Go back and look at the job you’re applying for, and look at courses you’ve taken. Look at assignments you’ve had to research and think about the steps you used to do those,” said. Owens. He says to highlight the activities that students have done in the past and not to immediately confess what you don’t have. Promote what you do have. 4. Take advantage of Career Services. “We feel like we’re the best kept secret of campus.” Career Services offers many tools for students looking for a job. They conduct mock interviews for students to prepare for real interviews. A student may also email or bring their resume in person so a Career Services representative can look at it. Owens said students should also check out the Cru Connection tool on the Career Services website. It gives alumni a chance to peruse open job...

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