First Gen students adjust to college life
Feb22

First Gen students adjust to college life

Published in the February 22, 2017 issue of The Bells With the number of college graduates increasing yearly, the number of first generation students increases as well. A first generation student is one who is the first of their immediate family to attend college. Nationwide, these students make up about 38 percent of college freshmen. Here at UMHB, 35 percent of the freshmen welcomed into the 2016 fall semester were also first generation. These students face a greater risk of dropping out of college, due to the increase in language barriers, an increased background in poverty, and loneliness. Though these factors can be difficult to combat, the university has steps in place to lessen the chance of these students dropping out. The Center of Academic Excellence (CAE) here on campus enrolls all first generation students in a program called Grades First, which notifies students of grade changes, upcoming assignments and due dates, and information about advising and financial aid. UMHB hopes to encourage and help students to graduate. “Transitioning to college was somewhat difficult for my parents because they didn’t necessarily know what to do about certain admissions and financial aid forms and such. They got help, though, and they are really pleased with my decision,” said freshman Mass Communication major, Halee Jorgensen. “As a first-generation student, UMHB has been helpful. I met with Dr. O’Rear, and he said he was happy I chose UMHB as a first-gen student, and he hopes I will call on them if I need help.” Jorgensen said she had a really good first semester and is even on track to graduate early. With her degree, she hopes to work for a magazine as a spread designer and photographer. Dr. O’Rear also hosts a dinner each year before the fall semester for all incoming first generation students, where they can meet the faculty and staff. This enables students to feel more secure about the environment they are coming into. During this event, O’Rear personally meets with each of the students, and tries to connect with them. By doing so, students are able to create a relationship with those in their new home. This then makes it less likely for them to drop out of college. “It was kind of tough at the beginning of my freshman year. I guess I really just didn’t know what to expect,” said sophomore history major, Joshua Gallegos. “I’m the first of all of my siblings not to go straight to working after high school, so it was strange for my family. They all supported me, but it was kind of nerve-wracking not knowing what to expect when starting...

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University shows love, reaches out to Belton community
Feb22

University shows love, reaches out to Belton community

Published in the February 22, 2017 issue of The Bells The Belton and Temple communities have been impacted by the university and student-led events, since the university moved to Belton in 1886. As the university grows larger, more and more students are reaching out to the community to provide help and support. Through different programs like Reaching Out and the BSM’s many ministries, the community has benefited from students’ labor and love for the town our university calls home. Students have visited places like Belton Christian Youth Center, Cedar Brake Retreat Center, Temple Animal Shelter, and Hope for the Hungry to help the community and these businesses. “Throughout the years, all the students that have volunteered have been extremely helpful,” said Dawn Hartman, the ACO of the Temple Animal Shelter, “We appreciate all the school has done.” Students have volunteered at the local shelter and have helped clean kennels, clean up the yard area, and spent time loving on the shelter’s animal residents. Recently, the campus organization Circle K went to the shelter and helped with what they could. Students also helped at the Cedar Brake Catholic Retreat Center, which is an area for private retreats for churches. At the last Reaching Out event held in the fall of 2016, 15 students painted many of the large porches on the site. The center would gladly welcome students back in a heartbeat. “We are very fortunate to be a recipient of their help. We got a lot more done with their help,” said Cedar Brake Director Brian Egan, “It is just like the verse on their shirts said, ‘Each of you should use whatever gift you have received to serve others, as faithful stewards of God’s grace in its various forms.’” Another off-campus site that has greatly benefited from the university is the Miller Spring Nature Center. The nature center is an asset to the community, so the help UMHB students bestow upon it is appreciated. UMHB students have helped mostly with physical labor at the center — removing obstacles so hikers can pass through the trails easily, and restoring the environment by planting and spreading native grass seeds. “The university [students] are the best at doing this work. It’s a partnership that we value,” said Rene Berkhoudt, the Miller Spring Nature Center’s coordinator. Dr. George Loutherback, university chaplain, said the community members often contact him praising the students’ contributions. “We get letters all the time thanking us for coming and doing and being and its put UMHB in a light to where is it helpful and not just existing in its own little boundaries,” said Dr. Loutherback. These businesses...

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Writer’s Festival  showcases Christian authors
Feb22

Writer’s Festival showcases Christian authors

Published in the February 22, 2017 issue of The Bells The Writers’ Festival is an annual event held at UMHB that celebrates the art of language through poetry, prose, visual art and songwriting. The event is a three-day series of panels, workshops and mixers that students, faculty and professional authors attend to learn more about creative writing and share original work. The event is hosted by the Windhover, a biannual publication of Christian writings that has been sponsored by UMHB since 2009. One of the featured aspects of the Writers’ Festival is a creative writing showcase, which features original works read by current UMHB students who were published in the preceding year’s Baylorian. The creative writing showcase was held on Wednesday, Feb. 15, and was succeeded by a dessert mixer and several other events throughout the day. Thursday night was the Writers’ Festival’s biggest event turnout, which was a concert from Still on the Hill that counted as a fine arts experience credit. Their album, “Still A River,” centers around the nation’s first national park, the Buffalo River. Their songs celebrate the stories that surround the area’s rich history and beautiful wildlife. The Arkansas natives, Donna and Kelly Molhollan, performed with eclectic melodies, unique instruments, and a “low-tech powerpoint” of images printed on fabric and bordered by various quilting patterns. Donna performs barefoot and flings her “powerpoint slides” on the stage beside her after the song that the quilt pertains to is over. The couple also led a workshop earlier that day with their orchestra of odd, one-of-a-kind instruments. The worship, titled Songwriting, aimed at allowing writers to explore how their work could be influenced by music, even if they are not musicians. The attending writers practiced reading their poems over simple music so that they could see the impact of spoken word to a beat, like the common practice of slam poetry. Though unlike most other musical groups that play at UMHB, Still on the Hill’s performance was interactive, carried a deeper message to campaign for the preservation of Buffalo River from a confined factory farm of 600 hogs, and unforgettable. Still on the Hill has been attending and performing at events at UMHB for over 20 years through ties with a few professors from the art department, Helen Kwiatkowski and Hershall Seals. The Writers’ Festival is a national event, with published authors coming in from all over the country, like Idaho, Kansas, Indiana, Washington, Arkansas, and others. The event has transformed from an event that is held over winter break to a period where students are encouraged to attend. Grace Rose, a junior English major, loves the...

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Manage finances wisely
Feb22

Manage finances wisely

Published in the February 22, 2017 issue of The Bells Tax season can be kind of a pain, but there’s one great reason to just get it over with– the refund check. When that money comes back to you all at once, it’s one of the greatest feelings in the world. It’s basically a paycheck made up of the money that was taken out of your other paychecks all year. But this extra paycheck makes us want to go out and use it, because it feels like extra money. It’s more than natural to take a stance like “I haven’t needed it all year, so why wouldn’t I spend it now?” Truth is, you need to treat it like any other paycheck. If you believe in tithing, 10 percent comes off the top and goes to your tithe. The next 10 percent you put away and pretend like it doesn’t exist. Call it a rainy day fund or emergency money. The rest of it is more discretionary, and here are a few ways you can put it to use. 1. Hold on to it. There’s still nothing forcing you to spend it right away. You never know when something new is going to come up, be it a movie, game or book that you’re going to need a little spending money for. 2. Spend some of it on something you really want. Most refunds are big enough for you to go out and buy yourself something you’ve been eyeballing for a while and still have some to spare. 3. Treat yo’ self. The view that a refund is entirely disposable income may be wrong, but it’s still your money and you’re an adult. You get to make your own decisions. Go out with friends, on a date, or spend a little money on yourself. It’s not something college students get to do incredibly often. 4. Invest some of it. Maybe you don’t know anything about investments, but someone you know probably does. You can ask a parent, grandparent, teacher, or someone you know who can help you make a wise investment. It’s a better idea than just blowing all of it, and it still leaves you some room to spend a...

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Saving money on clothes
Feb22

Saving money on clothes

Published in the February 22, 2017 issue of The Bells As a college student, money is tight. Between tuition, food, and gas, there isn’t much money left over to spend on clothing. Here are a few stores to check out to find cute styles at low prices. 1. Shar’s Consignment 1615 Canyon Creek Dr, Temple, TX 76502 Although slightly more expensive than a Goodwill, Shar’s Consignment is a great place to find name brand clothing for less. Plus they have some adorable boutique clothing for sale. If you’re thinking about getting rid of clothes, you can take them to Shar’s to receive store credit towards future purchases. 2. Scott and White Hospice Thrift Store 2160 N Main St Belton, TX 76513 Located about three minutes from campus, this thrift store has everything you could ever want: men’s and women’s clothing, formal wear, furniture, dishes, DVDs, purses, and jewelry. Because of the store’s reasonable prices, store manager Susan Robison said she was able to decorate her son’s entire apartment for a small amount of money. 3. Plato’s Closet 3213 E Central Texas Expy, Killeen, TX 76543 If you’re looking to get rid of name brand clothing, look no further than Plato’s Closet. They give cash or store credit in return for donations. Plato’s Closet looks for clothing that is on-trend, so you can keep up with the latest styles without paying mall prices. 4. Ross and Marshall’s 2112 SW H K Dodgen Lp Temple Town Square Temple, TX 76504 Located right next to each other, these two stores offer clothing. purses, shoes, home décor, and cookwear with significantly lower prices than typical department...

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How to save money while buying groceries
Feb22

How to save money while buying groceries

Published in the February 22, 2017 issue of The Bells Grocery shopping is an integral part of any functioning college student’s life, from non-traditional students with families to feed, to dorm-living freshmen The concept of grocery shopping is quite simple– buy food to eat for a certain period of time, take home and eat said food, and then go back to the grocery store after that food is gone. But, there are some tricks to making the most of grocery shopping, so that the trip is less expensive and helps you save time. 1. Check what you already have. First, make a list of the groceries you want to pick up. Write out all of the items you think you may need. Then, go through your pantry and see if you need to add anything to this list. Check how much of certain products you have, such as milk or eggs, and see if you need to stock up. This in turn will save time and consolidate your visits to one trip. 2. Find recipes for the week. Ever watch an easy recipe tutorial on Facebook or miss your mom’s chicken noodle soup? When grocery shopping, a good way to eliminate wastefulness or excess buying is to come prepared. Plan out what you want to eat for the week, including snacks and the core three meals. The meals you plan don’t have to be fancy (though you are welcome to experiment). If you plan to have sandwiches for the week, make sure to jot down the items you will need to pick up in order to accomplish those meals. This not only saves time throughout the week, but it also allows for a way to experiment with making new meals as well as saving on items that might expire. You can find good recipes on allrecipes.com. On this site, you can plug in certain ingredients as well as the time period in which you want to cook. Tastee can be found on youtube.com. These videos help guide you through the cooking process. Tastee chefs cook alongside you and give instructions as they go. 3. Buy different brands. When shopping, don’t always go looking for the name brand items. When on a budget, make sure to compare prices and labels. Sometimes the store brand will be the better buy. Also, make sure to check out the price per ounce. This can be found under the price, and will usually be a small portion of the price listed. This helps to show how much each item is selling for per ounce, as compared to the one next to it, and can...

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