Cru volleyball starts season strong in UMHB Invitational
Sep16

Cru volleyball starts season strong in UMHB Invitational

Young, powerful and determined. This is what sticks out when the 2015 Women’s Volleyball team comes to mind. Do not let this young team be underestimated. They went 3-1 at the 2015 UMHB Invitational. This team has proven that it can hold its own. Last year, the team was ranked 27th by the American Volleyball Coaches Association with a record of 25-6. But this year, the team hopes to go the distance. While Head Coach Rob Frost would not mind making it to the championship tournament, he said the main focus is making sure his team can work together and adjust to a college-level playing field. “I like what we are doing but it’s going to take some time. So we may be .500 this year,” Frost said. “We want to get to the national tournament, one way or another. So if it takes us a season to develop, it’s fine. There are no expectations other than to continue to grow and get better.” Frost said the biggest challenge the team faces is bringing the freshmen up to the speed of a college-paced game. While seniors Shelby Prather and Cheyenne Dowdey also agree the team is young, they recognize the strengths that the freshmen are bringing to the court. Dowdey believes the team has already improved from last season. “I think we are taller as a team and we jump higher as a team,” she said. “With our scrimmages I noticed we are blocking better, we are faster, we are hitting over and around people a lot better than we ever have.” Prather said that even though the team is inexperienced, the new players have stepped right in and are contributing. “Our girls are really focused. Our freshmen are ready to step up and play,” she said. “They know they are coming into a winning program and so I think they are going to do everything they can to help us win.” This team is bringing more power and higher jumps, and is determined not to go down without a fight. On Sept. 4, the Cru hosted the 2015 UMHB Invitational. The Cru Women’s Volleyball team went 3-1 in this tournament. Coach Frost, Dowdey and Prather all felt comfortable going into this tournament because the team has been able to keep up with Division II teams in scrimmage matches. The team is also feeling confident because of the work they’ve put in at the gym during the offseason. They may be young, but according to Prather, the goal is still the same. She said, “Overall I just want to win, win conference and go far and finish my senior...

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Sports Spotlight
Sep16

Sports Spotlight

Ben Hammonds is a senior business administration major from Flower Mound, Texas. Growing up, Hammonds participated in many sports, but favored baseball and soccer. Once he moved from St. Louis to Dallas, he decided to pursue his love for soccer. Hammonds is currently the team captain for the UMHB Men’s soccer team and plays the position of center forward. He has contributed to the team each season. His freshman year, he scored two goals. As a sophomore, he added another goal and earned All-ASC Honorable Mention. For his junior campaign, he was named to the All-ASC Second Team for scoring four more goals. This season, Hammonds and the Cru have begun this year with a road trip to the West Coast. Hammonds enjoys the freedom of the game. “My favorite thing about soccer is the freedom of it. Aside from free kicks there are no set plays, no timeouts or stoppages. Just 45-minute halves where players are free to do what they want to beat the opponent. I love my team. My favorite thing about the team is that we are truly brothers,” he said. Outside of soccer, Ben enjoys hanging out with his friends, taking in the Austin music scene and participating in student government. He is a representative for UMHB’s NCAA Student Athletic Advisory Committee and was once a member of the school’s Student Government Association (SGA) where he served as the athletics representative. Hammonds also enjoys watching soccer matches when he’s not playing in them. His favorite team is Chelsea FC, which competes in the Premier League. His favorite player is Frank Lampard, who is currently a member of the New York City FC. Because Hammonds has big aspirations for his career, he knew UMHB would be the right fit. “I had a few other offers from similar schools, but UMHB stood out to me. Coach Bankhead was a major factor in my decision. It was clear he cared about his players deeply and they respected him as well. I also had great interactions with the players on my visits and when I watched them play. UMHB is also beautiful. It was a really easy decision in the end,” he said. “One of the best decisions I have ever made.” Once Ben graduates this December, he plans to pursue a job in college athletics. However, he has not given up the option of playing professionally or being a member of a folk rock band. But before he graduates, Hammonds will be focusing on making an impact on his squad this season. “As a senior I hope to lead this year’s team to accomplish something special as...

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Cru defense stymies Millsaps
Sep16

Cru defense stymies Millsaps

The Crusaders got off to a slow start in their first game of the 2015 season, but they managed to shake off the rust and responded with a 65-12 thumping of Millsaps College Saturday night at Crusader stadium. After forcing a Millsaps three-and-out, the Cru got the scoring off early when senior quarterback Zach Anderson connected with junior Wykeyhe Walker for a 37-yard touchdown strike. After a 46-yard field goal from Jacob O’Neill, sophomore running back Duane Thompson ran around the right side and picked up a block from wide receiver Robbie Seybold to spring an 11-yard touchdown that put the Cru up 17-0. With 9:21 remaining in the second quarter, Anderson broke free for a 41-yard scramble to the eight yard line. Backup quarterback, Blake Jackson, entered the game and hit Walker on a fade in the endzone to extend the lead to 24-0. On the next drive, Jackson connected with junior wide receiver Lin Gillham for a 12-yard touchdown to make it 32-0. Anderson left the game in the second quarter with back tightness after completing five of nine passes for 92 yards and a touchdown, while adding 53 yards on the ground. Jackson was able to pick up the slack by going 10-for-15 with 116 yards and two scores through the air and another 46 yards rushing. Jackson admitted that the passing game wasn’t as efficient as it could have been in last week’s game, but a solid week of practice helped the offense get back on the right track. “We executed really well during practice and coach harped on me all week to strengthen that aspect of the game,” he said. “I worked my hardest to do that and got it done.” Senior running back Malcolm Miller scored the final touchdown of the half when he rumbled 20 yards up the middle to make it 39-0 at the break. The Cru racked up 375 yards rushing during the night and had six ballcarriers eclipse 40 yards. “We’re very talented, and there’s so many guys with the ball in their hands who can really do a lot of things. We just want to continue to give them the ball,” Head Coach Pete Fredenberg said. Millsaps attempted and recovered an onside kick to begin the second half. The Majors then mounted a 12-play drive that was capped off by a four-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Chance Clowers to Beau Wells. A failed extra point would leave the score at 39-6. The Cru answered with a 10-play drive of their own that ended on a three-yard scoring scramble by Jackson to make it 46-6. After a pair of...

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New PAC sets the stage for the future
Sep16

New PAC sets the stage for the future

Performing arts students are eager for a building of their own. Construction could begin as early as December 2015, or as soon as the building can be fully financed. Currently, performing arts students are using Presser Hall. Built in 1929, Presser is one of the two oldest buildings on campus. With the arrival of the new PAC, students and professors will have ample room to practice and to thrill audiences with their performances. The $18.5 million project will include a new performance stage that will seat 540 people (163 seats in the balcony), a small 100-seat performance room similar to a blackbox, a rehearsal room that is the same size as the performance stage, dressing rooms for men and women that can be converted into classrooms, a state of the art design shop, a costume shop, a small recording studio for small ensembles or individuals, a box office, and office space for staff members. The new PAC will be built on the corner of University Drive where the Huckins Apartments are currently located, right at the entrance of the university. The 40,725 square-foot building is an original design by co-designers Randall Scott Associates, and Westlake, Reed, and Leskosky. The building will cover an entire avenue. “The design, while modern, fits with the campus architectural style,” Associate Vice President for Campus Planning Robert Pattee said. “The new space will certainly be beneficial to the college of the visual and performing arts because of what happens there,” Dean of Performing Arts Ted Barnes said. Right now, performing arts students are using Walton Chapel, Meyers Christian Studies Building, Manning Chapel, and Temple’s Cultural Activities Center for their performances. “We do a pretty good job with the old venues we have … but it [the PAC] will make it so much more fun for not only the performers, but also for the patrons who come and watch it,” Barnes said. One of the main reasons that the students and professors are looking forward to the new PAC is because the new building will keep the opera musical theatre troupe and various wind ensembles from having to travel somewhere for a performance. Sophomore music education major, Brianna Frederickson, expressed that not having to constantly pack up all of their equipment and move it miles away in another place will be very beneficial for the students. “We can just have everything central in one location. We don’t have to worry about anything being lost. Associate Director of Opera Music Theatre Penny Hogan said the PAC will give the opera theatre program more room to build sets, to house costumes, and to keep track of props....

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Hurricane Katrina weighs heavily on victims, locals
Sep16

Hurricane Katrina weighs heavily on victims, locals

On Aug. 29, 2005, tragedy hit the shores of Louisiana and Mississippi, leaving thousands of people homeless and destroying cities and towns in the southern states. Hurricane Katrina quickly became one of the deadliest hurricanes and costliest natural disasters in United States history. It has been 10 years since the hurricane struck, but people are still affected by it today. As many as 1,800 people were killed and 400,000 people had to evacuate their homes. For some, that became permanent. Many of the residents who were affected by the storm took refuge in Texas. Churches and families also opened up their own homes for people in need of shelter. Many places in the central Texas area, including UMHB, made an effort in helping the victims of Hurricane Katrina. One of the churches that helped out was Bethel Assembly of God in Temple. The church took about 100 evacuees from the New Orleans area. “There were so many people involved. You can imagine since there were so many affected by the storm,” Elwyn Johnston, the church’s pastor, said. Because so many were displaced by the hurricane, it was difficult to house the dozens of refugees in the church’s gym, which was being used as a makeshift shelter. But despite tight quarters, the victims stayed for several nights until they found places to stay that were more permanent or until they could reach their families who were located in Texas. Many people in the central Texas area were involved in the efforts to help the evacuees. Even UMHB students offered their free time. They made and served meals to the victims of the hurricane and welcomed them to stay in their apartments or dorm rooms for as long as they needed. Hurricane Katrina was a strong Category 5 hurricane and was the fifth hurricane that happened in 2005. It originated in the Bahamas and had a maximum wind speed of 175 mph. It was the strongest hurricane ever recorded in the Gulf of Mexico until Hurricane Rita hit almost a month later. The aftermath of hurricane is still effecting the residents of Louisiana today. The destruction included many lives lost, damaged land and the loss of homes all across the Gulf Coast. The estimated cost of destruction is said to be about $108 billion. But despite the tremendous loss and damage, the state has rebuilt their population, created new buildings and has even added new attractions. The city that has always been known for its historic value and diverse culture has thrived since rebuilding efforts, and local dignitaries paid tribute to the city with many events marking the tenth anniversary of...

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Maybee Student Center gets facelift, new purpose
Apr29

Maybee Student Center gets facelift, new purpose

When the Bawcom Student Union building opened last fall, the Mabee Student Center seemed a little empty. However, the university has repurposed the facility and is beginning the process of moving several student services into the building.   The newly renovated facility is designed to be a one-stop-shop for student needs. It will be home to the Campus Police Department, post office and dining services.   “Whether you need a parking permit, your mail, or to grab a quick snack…it’s all in one location now,” project manager Rob Pattee said.   For the police department, the relocation not only offers more space, but also a more desirable location on campus.   “We spend a great deal of time interacting with many of the departments being relocated to Mabee. By sharing this facility, collaboration will be much easier,” Chief of Police Gary Sargent said. “The location of the new police department should enhance our level of accessibility and convenience.”   Sargent said the added space will also allow for enhanced privacy for individuals who enter the offices.   The first floor will house the police station and will include a dining area and a large common area complete with computer stations. This will also be the location of the new convenience store, Mabee Market, which was named through a contest by students. Pattee said this area will replace the space students lost when the old SUB closed.   “Students were surveyed on needs for open hang-out space, so I’m sure that it will fill that need,” he said.   The second floor will be home to several student services. The space that was once occupied by Shelton Theater is now home to a large study area. There are also offices for the Writing Studio, Center for Global Engagement and Center for Academic Excellence.   The CAE moved from Hardy, and Director Katie Bonner said the center is already seeing the benefits provided by added space.   “In Hardy we were overflowing … because we offer places for students to study. Our old space held about 18 to 20 people, and now we have room for much more,” she said.   The facility brings added resources for tutoring along with private tutoring rooms of which students can take advantage.   “We have eight different private tutoring rooms, now. The tutoring appointments can be more proactive because they’re all going to be equipped with white boards, so the tutor can really get into it with active learning and the student can step up to the white board without having people seeing them,” Bonner said.   Bonner has noticed a large number of...

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