Crusader love story celebrated at Valentine’s
Feb04

Crusader love story celebrated at Valentine’s

At some point in everyone’s life, people develop crushes. Many times, that’s the state in which the relationship remains because the person who is being crushed on is either oblivious or famous.   Assistant Director of Campus Activities Jeff Sutton was determined not to lose his crush that easily.   Jeff and his now wife Jen Sutton met at UMHB on their first day of Welcome Week in 2003 during a meal in Hardy Hall.   “I was really impressed with Jeff. I was drawn to his “life of the party” personality because he was the exact opposite of me. I never thought of him as marriage material, but knew he’d be an awesome friend,” Jen said. “It wasn’t until the next year that I really began to find out who he was. We served together in Hope’s Local Outreach program and I was able to experience his heart for missions and witness his love of people. It was during this time that I saw something different in him and could see our future together.”   Jeff, being like many college guys, was never aware of how Jen felt about him.   “Boys are dumb,” he said. “I was really slow to catch onto how amazing she was and what I was missing.”   While Jen was crushing on him, Jeff simply thought they were friends. Little did he know, she had different plans for them.   “We don’t have a “love at first sight” story. I had to chase him for years. I didn’t give up because I knew he was the one. I don’t know anyone else who has that story,” Jen said.   The two graduated from UMHB, but it wasn’t until the September after commencement that Jeff realized what he was overlooking.   “It seemed as though everyone knew we would eventually be married, but I was slow to catch on. I cherished our friendship and didn’t want to mess that up by trying to pursue a relationship,” Jeff said.   He finally came to his senses, and he and Jen began dating. In 2009, the couple got married, and then Mayor Jim Covington of Belton and good friend of the Suttons officially proclaimed July 11 as “Jeff and Jen Sutton Day.”   “I was so happy for them of course. But, I wasn’t surprised at all. When they started dating, I knew they would get married,” long-time friend and Jen’s former roommate Stephanie Covington said.   Local magazine Tex Appeal was recently in search of couples with unique stories to highlight for their Valentine’s Day issue. A friend mentioned the Suttons to the editor...

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Professor turns class into campus film fest
Feb04

Professor turns class into campus film fest

The theater lights dim and Charlie Chaplin’s iconic character appears on the screen, complete with his cane, bowler hat and unmistakable moustache. His slapstick antics have the audience’s attention as they watch to see how he’s going to get out of a sticky situation. No, this isn’t a flashback to a 1920s movie theater, but rather a scene from Brindley Auditorium as part of a semester-long film series put on by the communication and media studies department.   The series was born from a class, Film History and Criticism, in which students view and discuss iconic films. The professor who teaches the course, Dr. Joseph Tabarlet, has opened his class to the public so that others can view the historic films that are seldom shown in theater-like settings.   Tabarlet belonged to the Central Texas Film Society, which hosted a similar series.   “We did that for a little over two years at the CAC in Temple. It was a lot of fun. I got to see films that I had never seen before and I was able to introduce people to films that I loved that they had never seen before,” he said.   He wanted to bring something similar to UMHB and saw that his Film History and Criticism class would be the perfect opportunity to do so. Films are shown every Monday at 2 p.m. in York 102. Each film in the series either has an important historical significance or has had a lasting impact on the film industry itself.   The first few weeks focus on the early stages of the motion picture industry.   “In this series, we’re seeing a lot of silent films, and the reason for that is that’s such an important part of film history,” Tabarlet said. “You can’t understand how the film industry developed unless you see those films made before 1930 that in many cases are ignored.”   Modern moviegoers may not think silent era films are appealing, but senior general studies major Robert Edwards said they’re more entertaining than one might think.   “I don’t think I ever watched too many silent films, but now that I have, me and my wife watch them together for entertainment,” Edwards said.   Tabarlet said those who avoid silent films are avoiding a major part of cinematic history.   “If they don’t see the silent films because they’re silent, then they’re missing out on a lot. Silent film is an art form ….,” he said.   Even though most people think comedy when thinking of silent films, Tabarlet said they can have a powerful impact as well.   “I remember the...

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Student leaders look ahead,  seek guidance for future
Feb04

Student leaders look ahead, seek guidance for future

The weekend before last, students packed luggage into a trailer and filled several university vans and embarked on a three-and-a-half-hour journey to Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene. Hardin-Simmons was this year’s host school for the annual Christian Association of Student Leaders conference. UMHB attendees represented almost every organization on campus including the likes of Student Government Association, Baptist Student Ministries, Campus Activities Board Welcome Week Steering Committee and Residence Life Association.   Junior psychology major Ross Jones went to the convention with members of First Year Council, also known as FYC. This was his third time to participate.   “My favorite part of CASL is getting to connect with students from other universities and sharing ideas. This year in particular really helped me step into the shoes of a first-year student and take into mind the stress level that they are experiencing and how to work with that not to overwhelm them more,” he said.   Not only did he meet and learn from students at other universities, but the experience made him grateful and gave him a new respect for his own school.   Overall, something I always end up taking away from CASL is perspective and the realization that we are truly blessed here at UMHB in a variety of ways and a lot of the time we tend to take it for granted.   Senior international business major and Student Body President Jonathan Kendall was among the representatives from SGA.   One lesson he took away from the event was how “to better prepare senators for SGA and to communicate the work that is happening within SGA.”   Maegan Loya, a senior education major and executive member of Campus Activities Board, enjoyed herself, but was sad this would be her last year to attend. What made this year special for her was being asked to make a presentation to all of the universities’ Campus Activities Boards about events she and her team have helped plan and execute at UMHB.   “It was great because it’s something I know, love and could talk about with ease. After submitting my presentation among every other school, I was honored to be one of two selected to present at CASL for Student Activities,” she said.   Another highlight of the event for Loya was the second night, which featured a concert by Christian songwriter and recording artist Jimmy Needham.   She said, “I absolutely loved it! I had never seen him live … which made me even more excited to see...

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Offering hope through textiles
Feb04

Offering hope through textiles

Over 3,000 miles away, hundreds of women and their families’ lives are being transformed through the operations of tiny warehouse number seven located in the UMHB Williams Service Center.   The works of Threads of Hope, a nonprofit organization that aids artisans in Peru by purchasing textiles and shipping them to churches and organizations around the country for them to sell.   “The university invited us with the belief that it would be beneficial for students by providing them with academic as well as service opportunities,” Jennifer Kellner, Threads of Hope center manager, said.   Since the foundation of Threads of Hope in 1999, the organization has strived to meet the needs of these family breadwinners by, “empowering impoverished women, [and] transforming lives.”   Originally based out of Plano, under the leadership of Cinde Rawn, Threads of Hope director, the small operation moved its warehouse to the campus just last February as part of a rare partnership that provides opportunity to its students, as well as assistance a people group in need.   “The organization’s collaboration with UMHB is unique,” Dr. Christie Bledsoe, chair of the Threads of Hope advisory board, said. “We are providing a space for the business operations.”   This “incubator idea” as one might call it, includes taking in an organization and giving it the room it needs to grow.   During the first year in action, the advisory council pushed to establish a functioning operational system, the “focus for 2015 will be marketing and publicizing the Threads of Hope partnership with UMHB on campus, in the community and among other universities,” Kellner said.   The partnership came about when a few members of the Threads of Hope board came to speak during the campus’ annual Missions Emphasis Week, just a few years prior.   “They were warmly received and their message resonated with the students,” Dr. David Bonner, advisory council member, said. “This led to student internships and projects, as well as two international studies trip,” which included both an MBA and undergraduate class.   As the relationship between the university and Threads of Hope continued to grow, the organization addressed Dr. Bonner with its needs, one of which included a place where passionate, servant minded students could help improve the operations of the nonprofit for further growth.   “(With) creativity on both of their parts, it culminated with Threads of Hope coming on campus to occupy space in the Williams Service Center,” Dr. Bonner said.   Since the warehouse has moved to the university campus, the organization has seen exceptional growth, as textile sales rocket to 44 percent.   With established contacts in...

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Artist gives sight to listeners
Jan22

Artist gives sight to listeners

 The Baugh Center for the Visual Arts is hosting works of art from graphic designer Carlos Hernandez.   On Thursday, Jan. 15, Hernandez came to talk to students about his displayed art and how he came into the profession he is in now.   He began the evening with a story about what influenced him to pursue the field of graphic design.   When Hernandez was 7, he found an album at the grocery store.   He held up the album.   “I see this album and I just think this is a cool band. I don’t know who they are, I don’t know anything about it, but I know I like the album cover… and because I liked the cover, I bought the album and brought it home,” Hernandez said.   After taking it home and showing his mom, his mom explained to him that the cover was an illustration that someone was paid to create for the band.   He was so amazed by the artwork and the fact that people did that for a living that he decided he wanted to do that as well.   Hernandez grew up in Lubbock. He now resides in Houston after graduating from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s in graphic design and illustration.   He credits much of his success to living in a small town and not being exposed to as much growing up because it made him want to see more of the world.   Now, his work has been featured in several different publications and he has also designed gig posters for many artists that include Kings of Leon, The Kills, Santana and more. He also designed the poster art for the 2013 Austin City Limits Music Festival.   He is a founding partner of Burning Bones Press, a printmaking studio.   During the gallery talk, he mentioned the process of screen printing, a form of graphic design that Hernandez frequently uses.   “During the… Great Depression… the United States got involved with art. That’s the only time in history the government got involved with art and paid artists to do art. It was called the… Works Progress Administration.”   The WPA put people back to work by training artists and amateurs to create poster art for the government.   The show that is featured in Baugh is primarily gig posters made the same way that the WPA made their posters when they trained men and women.   “Some of the posters are… out there,” Hernandez said about his work and some examples of other students’ works.   He did a lot of monochronmatic jobs in...

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New music shop rocks belton
Jan22

New music shop rocks belton

Music and ministry merge together at a new music store off Highway 190 and Loop 121 in Belton.   Texas Tour Gear co-owners Seth Vance and Jon Cooper are both Christian, “and people who come in here definitely know that,” Cooper said, “and we don’t try to hide it.”   Both play a vital role at Vista Community Church.   Cooper used to work at Heart of Texas, Temple’s music store, before it closed down.   He developed relationships with local musicians during his time there.   “A lot of guys know my background. I had a rough past, and I’m pretty open about it,” he said. “They still come in and talk about stuff.”   Vance and Cooper also don’t hide good deals. For $20 an hour, bands can come into the store’s fully stocked stage and practice. For $150 a month, bands can rent the space. They receive a guaranteed two-hour time slot each day.   Senior Christian studies major, musician and Texas Tour Gear employee Matthew Boden believes that’s a great deal when it comes to renting practice time. He noted that some places in Austin charge $100 a day.   “UMHB students who bring their Cru Card can receive an extra five percent off their purchase,” Cooper added.   Vance is involved in doing professional church installations which include sound, lighting and all things A/V.   “We’re going to start having live events here,” Cooper said.   Since the May 5 opening, business has been steadily increasing.   “It’s really cool working for these guys because they’re my friends and my bosses,” Boden said.   “It’s neat because I like music and I’ve learned about pro audio, guitar care and they rely on me for guitar theory.”   Customers find Boden to be an asset when they’re looking for that perfect sound.   “Finding out more on how guitars work on the mechanical side,” has been beneficial to Boden’s own music, he said. “It’s been a really enriching experience. And plus, I get to play music all day.”   Boden said they see a lot of high-school-aged kids come into the store. Also, they’ve seen an influx of an older demographic, which used to frequent Heart of Texas.   “Really we get a bunch of different ages and a bunch of different people coming in.”   Texas Tour Gear also offers rentals, repairs and lessons as well as a variety of guitars, drums, keyboards, gear, both new and used, for sale.   Shop employees welcome anyone who wants to go in and talk about the music industry.   It is, after all, as Cooper put...

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