Information session for veterans and dependants
Sep12

Information session for veterans and dependants

Veteran Career Advisor Sarah Phillips told veterans about eight different programs available to them. This occurred when UMHB’s chapter of Salute Veteran’s National Honor Society sponsored a Texas Veteran’s Commission information session in the Lord Conference Center located in Parker Academic Center on Tuesday, Sep. 4. These eight different programs she addressed are: The Claims Department of the Texas Veteran’s Commission helps veterans who have a discharge other than honorable to upgrade their discharge so they can get access to benefits. The Education De- partment approves all VA schools in Texas, and they approve on-the-job training programs. The Entrepreneur program helps veterans start and expand a business. The Fund for Veterans Assistance program provides grants to charitable organizations that provide direct assistance to veterans. The Healthcare Advocate program helps veterans navigate through the VA Hospital. The Mental Health program provides training to veterans, their families, and licensed mental health providers. The Woman Veterans program helps female veterans get the benefits they have earned. The employment program helps veterans fine-tune their resumes, plus look for and obtain jobs. Phillips spoke on the importance of having a master resume. “A master resume is usually a monster of a document. You don’t send it to anyone, but you keep track of everything you have ever done on this document,” she said. “You want to keep it updated as much as you can.” Phillips said that students should highlight how they can be team players on their resumes. “You can’t train someone to be a team player,” Phillips said. “If there’s some aspect [on a group project] that you took the lead on, say it ,” she said. Phillips also spoke about potential employers labeling candidates as over-qualified. “The reason that you’re told you’re over-qualified is because you’re putting things like you’re a leader on your resume, even though the position doesn’t require it,” she said. Phillips also said that having volunteer experience gives students hands-on experience with the job that they are interested in. “A lot of companies would love to have someone work for them for free. It’s also a great networking opportunity,” she said. Phillips also spoke about the VA work-study program. This program is available to veterans or their spouses that are in school and utilizing the GI bill. Students can work on average 25-hours a week for $7.25 per hour with this program. Phillips said that she has a passion for speaking to veterans about finding a job because she used to be in their shoes. “I was a veteran who didn’t know how to find a job,” Phillips said. “I walked into the workforce center thinking I...

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Showcasing students’ businesses
Sep12

Showcasing students’ businesses

College students often find themselves in need of a quick way to earn money. For some, their passions and talents drive them to create their own business. Several students here at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor share how they built their businesses and give advice on how students can start their own. Matt Murray, a senior mathematics major, started Pedagon Education in June of this year. Pedagon Education, a combination of polygon and pedagogy, is a tutoring, mentorship and consultancy business that focuses on the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics area of education. They also work on consulting with prospective students by helping them build four-year plans. Pedagon Education serves students in the Belton, Temple, Killeen and Austin areas. Tutoring subscription rates start at 25 dollars for high school students and 35 dollars for college students. The first session is always free. “I had been wanting to start the business for a while, but found myself in need of a marketing representative,” Murray said. This is where Katie Scott, a senior marketing major, comes in. Katie focuses on the social side of the business. Murray believes you need to find someone to be able to approach others online and to get your name out there. Scott recommends that if someone is looking to start their own business they should network and use social media to get their name out there and build their brand. Murray agrees that you need to find someone to show off your skills. You can get in touch with them by email, katie.scott@pedagonedu.com and matt.murray@pedagonedu.com, or phone at 254-228-9609 and 817-600-6892. And check them out on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter @PedagonEdu. Danielle Demetria East, a senior studio art major, sells her artwork on the side of earning her degree. She is a talented sculptor and also makes handmade journals and mixed media collages. When East came to college she thought this would be a good way to “jump start her career” and make a little cash on the side. Her products range anywhere from 5 dollars to 300 dollars depending on the piece. East recommends that students speak up and meet new people to network with. She advises artists to know their work and its value and not to sell themselves short. Follow her on Instagram @danielledemetria or check out her website danielledemetria.portfoliobox.net. Megan Henefield, a freshman education major, specializes in portrait, group, and live-action photography. Her business started during her sophomore year of high school. She grew up in a family of photographers, so it was natural for her to choose this profession. “I grew up in front of a camera and gradually stepped...

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Hurricane Harvey: UMHB students share their thoughts about life after the storm

It has been a little over a year since devastation wreaked havoc in the Houston area. What started as a small tropical storm quickly became a category four hurricane, causing a large loss of life and property. On August 17, 2017, Hurricane Harvey hit on the eastern coast of Texas. According to the Houston Public Media from the University of Houston, the hurricane caused at least 72 fatalities. The rise in water was measured at 12.5 feet at the Aransas Wildlife Refuge. According to worldvison.org, 135,000 houses were affected by Hurricane Harvey as many people lost their homes and everything they owned. Harvey also became the second most expensive hurricane in the United States since 1900 (worldvision.org). Fox news estimates an average of 154 billion in damages across the state of Texas as a result of the storm. Sarah Harvey, who just happens to have the same last name as the name of the storm, is a senior marketing major at UMHB, whose hometown, Port Neches, was heavily affected. “The night Hurricane Harvey hit, it was controlled chaos,” Sarah said. “Everyone who had a boat was out in the floodwaters rescuing people from their homes that had filled with water. My family made it up to our church, where my mom was on staff at the time. The gym at the church hadn’t flooded, so it became a shelter in the area. The rains didn’t stop and the flooding continued all through the night. For days after that, the water didn’t go down. I felt so helpless because I was here in Belton.” In response to the disaster and all the people in need, various communities came together to help one another. Brianna Flanter, a freshman biology and pre-dental major, witnessed her neighborhood and the surrounding cities outside of Houston band together to create a bit of light in this dark time. “I actually live about 30 minutes outside of Houston so everything around us got flooded,” Flanter said. “All my neighbors, friends, and family got water in their houses. However, even in literal high water, everyone stayed extremely positive. Rescue boats from people in our town, other towns, and even other states came to help us out.” “When the flooding dried out, people immediately started helping people demo their homes and donating at shelters. Most of the shelters in Houston actually couldn’t even accept more food. Houston really came together and it made me really emotional.” Both Flanter and Sarah Harvey became involved in the helping process, assisting in various ways. “My high school was working really hard to put on a musical that was supposed to open...

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Taking a look back: 17 years since 9/11
Sep12

Taking a look back: 17 years since 9/11

On September 11, 2001, America was attacked by 19 men who had been trained by Al Qaeda. The men hijacked four passenger planes and at approximately 8:45 a.m. an American Airlines Boeing 767 crashed into the North Tower of the World Trade Center. 18 minutes later, people watched United Airlines Flight 175 crash into the South Tower of the World Trade Center. At approximately 9:45 a.m., American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the west side of the Pentagon. United Flight 93 was also hijacked and crashed into a field in western Pennsylvania at 10:10 a.m. (BBC and CNN). During the attack at the World Trade Center, 2,763 people, including 343 firefighters and paramedics, 23 New York City police officers and 37 Port Authority police officers were killed. At the Pentagon, 189 people, including 74 people aboard American Airlines Flight 77 were killed. All 44 people aboard United Flight 93 were killed. A total of 2,996 people lost their lives during these terrorist attacks, making it the deadliest terrorist attack in American history (BBC, CNN). The South Tower of the World Trade Center collapsed from the heat and explosion caused by the plane, just 15 minutes after both Boeing planes crashed into the Twin Towers. At 10:30 a.m., the North Tower collapsed. Approximately 10,000 people were treated for injuries after the towers collapsed, and only six people who were in the towers when they collapsed survived (History.com). The jet fuel from the Boeing aircraft that crashed into the Pentagon started a fire which led to a structural collapse of that building as well. None of the members aboard American Airlines Flight 77 survived (History.com). Passengers aboard United Flight 93 discovered that the flight was being hijacked and took action. It is believed that the passengers and flight attendants were able to overwhelm the terrorists with a fire extinguisher, causing a loss of control of the aircraft. The plane plummeted at approximately 500 miles per hour and crashed in a field in western Pennsylvania. None of the members of Flight 93 survived (History.com). Americans have worked to preserve the history of the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks. Museums and memorials have been opened across the nation to remind the American people of the tragedy of the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the brave people who gave their lives to protect others. The National September 11 Memorial and Museum, located in New York City is dedicated to preserving the lives lost during the Attacks. UMHB freshman social work major Natalie Gonzalez Blanco visited the museum in 2017. “The original flag that was flown by the towers was on display at the memorial,” Blanco said. “They...

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First Generation dinner: Making transitions and learning traditions
Sep12

First Generation dinner: Making transitions and learning traditions

To welcome the 370 first-generation freshmen who became Crusaders this year, The University of Mary Hardin-Baylor’s President Randy O’Rear hosted the third annual First to Go Welcome Dinner on his front lawn on campus Thursday, Aug. 30. The recently established annual dinner is held for first-generation freshmen to help them get in touch with other students, faculty and even President O’Rear himself. Students had the chance to eat Cru dogs for the first time, take pictures in a photo booth and participate in a raffle for UMHB themed prizes. UMHB defines the term ‘first-generation’ as a student where neither parents received a bachelor’s degree or higher. Katie Gregory is the head of the First to Go (F2G) program and a Student Success Specialist in the Center for Academic Excellence (CAE). She personally contacts each student before the school year starts and answers their questions. “There have always been first-generation students attending UMHB, but [this is the third year the program has been active].“As each year passes, we enhance the program to be more impactful and beneficial for students,” Gregory said. Statistics show that three out of five first-generation college students do not complete a degree in six years, and 60 percent of the first-generation students who drop out of college do so during their first year. These are two statistics UMHB is trying to change. By providing recourses and answering questions, the F2G program is helping first-generation students realize that they are not alone and have many people who want them to succeed in life beyond UMHB. “Originally, I felt we had such a large number of first-generation students and I felt that the university could do more for that group of students and encourage them. The national statistics communicate that it is hard to be successful as a first-generation student,” President Randy O’Rear said. He started hosting the dinner to show first-generation students that UMHB cares about their well-being and achievements. He wanted to show the incoming freshmen that they are not alone in this and help is all around them. “They came to Mary Hardin-Baylor because they want to obtain a college degree and we are here to help them reach that goal,” O’Rear said. Many students have some sort of idea about what college will be like or they can ask their parent about their college years. But first-generation students don’t really know what to expect because they are the first in their family to experience college. Freshman social work major Mary Herschberger says that a big challenge for her is breaking the cycle of not attending a college. And she feels the pressure to succeed...

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Welcome Week 2018 Gallery

Photo by Claire Henry Photo by Claire Henry Freshmen gathered at Luther Memorial for the candlelight Dubbing Ceremony on Sunday, Aug. 19. Since 1995, the ceremony has begun by the current Crusader Knight (this year’s Crusader Knight is Caleb Fitzwater) taking a part of the living flame and distributing it among faculty and students. Faculty traditionally place swords over the shoulders of freshmen, dubbing them Crusaders for Life. Photo by Madeline Oden/ The Bells UMHB President Dr. Randy O’Rear unloads a student’s vehicle on Move-In Day outside of Remschel Hall on Wednesday, Aug. 15. Waiting to help move more boxes at left of O’Rear is Jack Phelps, Chairman of the UMHB Board of Trustees. Seniors Katie Maniscalo, Ellie Ball, and Allie Walker flash their “C”s in Bawcom Student Union during the Spirit and Traditions Rally on Thursday, Aug. 16. Photo by Sarah Ifft/ The Bells Photo by Claire Henry Photo by Madeline Oden/ The Bells Photo by Madeline Oden/ The Bells Photo by Madeline Oden/ The Bells Photo by Madeline Oden/ The bells Photo by Madeline Oden/ The bells Photo by Claire Henry Photo by Madeline Oden/ The bells Photo by Madeline Oden/ The bells Photo by Madeline Oden/ The bells Photo by Madeline Oden/ The Bells Photo by Madeline Oden/ The Bells Photo by Madeline Oden/ The Bells Sophomore Madison Henry flashes a thumbs up while passing out candles to freshmen for the Dubbing Ceremony outside of Walton Chapel on Sunday, Aug. 19. Photo by Madeline Oden/ The Bells Photo by Madeline Oden/ The Bells Sophomore pre-med major Will Williams talks to freshman accounting major Nobel Smith about the organization “Some Christians @ UMHB” at the Big Fair on King Street on Thursday, Aug. 16. photo by Madeline Oden/ The...

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