Saving money on clothes
Feb22

Saving money on clothes

Published in the February 22, 2017 issue of The Bells As a college student, money is tight. Between tuition, food, and gas, there isn’t much money left over to spend on clothing. Here are a few stores to check out to find cute styles at low prices. 1. Shar’s Consignment 1615 Canyon Creek Dr, Temple, TX 76502 Although slightly more expensive than a Goodwill, Shar’s Consignment is a great place to find name brand clothing for less. Plus they have some adorable boutique clothing for sale. If you’re thinking about getting rid of clothes, you can take them to Shar’s to receive store credit towards future purchases. 2. Scott and White Hospice Thrift Store 2160 N Main St Belton, TX 76513 Located about three minutes from campus, this thrift store has everything you could ever want: men’s and women’s clothing, formal wear, furniture, dishes, DVDs, purses, and jewelry. Because of the store’s reasonable prices, store manager Susan Robison said she was able to decorate her son’s entire apartment for a small amount of money. 3. Plato’s Closet 3213 E Central Texas Expy, Killeen, TX 76543 If you’re looking to get rid of name brand clothing, look no further than Plato’s Closet. They give cash or store credit in return for donations. Plato’s Closet looks for clothing that is on-trend, so you can keep up with the latest styles without paying mall prices. 4. Ross and Marshall’s 2112 SW H K Dodgen Lp Temple Town Square Temple, TX 76504 Located right next to each other, these two stores offer clothing. purses, shoes, home décor, and cookwear with significantly lower prices than typical department...

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How to save money while buying groceries
Feb22

How to save money while buying groceries

Published in the February 22, 2017 issue of The Bells Grocery shopping is an integral part of any functioning college student’s life, from non-traditional students with families to feed, to dorm-living freshmen The concept of grocery shopping is quite simple– buy food to eat for a certain period of time, take home and eat said food, and then go back to the grocery store after that food is gone. But, there are some tricks to making the most of grocery shopping, so that the trip is less expensive and helps you save time. 1. Check what you already have. First, make a list of the groceries you want to pick up. Write out all of the items you think you may need. Then, go through your pantry and see if you need to add anything to this list. Check how much of certain products you have, such as milk or eggs, and see if you need to stock up. This in turn will save time and consolidate your visits to one trip. 2. Find recipes for the week. Ever watch an easy recipe tutorial on Facebook or miss your mom’s chicken noodle soup? When grocery shopping, a good way to eliminate wastefulness or excess buying is to come prepared. Plan out what you want to eat for the week, including snacks and the core three meals. The meals you plan don’t have to be fancy (though you are welcome to experiment). If you plan to have sandwiches for the week, make sure to jot down the items you will need to pick up in order to accomplish those meals. This not only saves time throughout the week, but it also allows for a way to experiment with making new meals as well as saving on items that might expire. You can find good recipes on allrecipes.com. On this site, you can plug in certain ingredients as well as the time period in which you want to cook. Tastee can be found on youtube.com. These videos help guide you through the cooking process. Tastee chefs cook alongside you and give instructions as they go. 3. Buy different brands. When shopping, don’t always go looking for the name brand items. When on a budget, make sure to compare prices and labels. Sometimes the store brand will be the better buy. Also, make sure to check out the price per ounce. This can be found under the price, and will usually be a small portion of the price listed. This helps to show how much each item is selling for per ounce, as compared to the one next to it, and can...

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Who produces and distributes the Stall Street Journal?
Feb08

Who produces and distributes the Stall Street Journal?

Published in the February 22, 2017 issue of The Bells When students go into public restrooms on campus, there is a good chance they’ll see a bright, cheerful newsletter on the stall door. The Stall Street Journal gives helpful information on campus events and provides tips on maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The Journal was created in 1998 by the former campus nurse, Jeanne Duphree, who got the idea from going to Chili’s and seeing scores posted in the restroom. Depree knew that the article would have guaranteed readership, so she brought the idea to UMHB. The publication was a collaboration between several staff before the secretary of Health, Counseling and Testing Services, Heather Hansen, took over the job five years ago. Now she writes, designs, and distributes the Journal. Hansen said that many students are surprised when they find out that the journal is produced by the Health, Counseling, and Testing Services. “It’s kind of fun that way. [The students] are like, ‘I wonder who writes it,’ … I was putting it out in the bathrooms, and one of the student workers said ‘y’all write that? We love that.’ It seems to be pretty popular, and everyone seems to like it,” she said. The template Hansen uses was created by art students when she first took over the journal. “We had a competition where they could create the template, and then we chose one. We’ve had that one for a while, so we’re probably going to do something like that soon to freshen it up a bit.” Hansen gets her writing inspiration from the counselors and the trends they see from the students who come into the center. The journal is a helpful and easy read for students and faculty. “The information about physical health, mental health, and spiritual health is what we want to get out to the students,” she said. “We put in whatever we think will be relevant to the students. But we also address some things that the faculty can relate to.” The February issue focused on taking care of the physical body because Feb. 22 through March 4 is Eating Disorder Awareness Week. The issue included tips on investing in yourself, attitudes toward weight and self-worth, and eating disorder statistics. The issue also includes urls to websites such as Huffingtonpost.com, counseling.uogregion.edu, and eatingdisorderhope.com, along with information about when food spots on campus are open. “The 18-24 age group is really affected by eating disorders, so we always make sure we talk about that every year at this time.” Freshman nursing major Lauren Houston said she often reads the Stall Street Journal. “I like it...

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Sodexo offers specialty nights, 1845 Grill serves breakfast
Feb08

Sodexo offers specialty nights, 1845 Grill serves breakfast

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells The dining hall has gone through many changes since its inception. Most recently, students saw the cafeteria-style dining moved from Hardy Hall to the new and improved student union, Bawcom. Now there are even more changes coming to the dining process on campus. Recently, the dining hall (which is open to all students, but more namely those living in residence halls) has begun doing specialty dinners. Specializing in one particular type of meal makes it easier for students to decide on where they want to eat that night. Some of the specialty nights have included meals such as classic southern chicken dinners, burger and pizza dinners, and various other southern, home-grown classics. These nights have been successful in pleasing the university community, including students and faculty alike. Eating in the dining hall can be the quite the experience for all, as the buffet tends to offer many varying options to appeal to the Cru community. Whether students are eating in the dining hall with friends, to wandering in 10 minutes before class for a quick bite, many Crusaders have a positive tale to tell when speaking about their dining experiences. “There are a few things students should know about eating in the dining hall,” says Elizabeth Sawatzki, sophomore Spanish major and Sodexo employee. “We are now not allowed to put ice cream in cups for those who enjoy root beer floats, but you can transfer it yourself manually.” The dining hall employee said for another dining hall treat, students can toast cookies in the toaster to make them yummy and warm. “Another tip I’d give to students is that If one station is out of a condiment or topping you like, always check a different station. There will more than likely be one with some. It’s really just learning the hacks for the dining hall, and making the most of the situation.” The dining hall also provides meals to the university community through various fast-food chains that are open on campus. This includes a student favorite– The 1845 Grill, which is also located in the Bawcom Student Union building. The grill is known for the fresh foods it serves at a reasonable price. Their hours range from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Fridays, and 7 p.m. to 12 a.m. on Sundays. Some of these times vary by day, which allows students to enjoy various dishes such as pancakes or tacos between classes. “Honestly, it’s nice to get a burger from the Grill every few days,” said Freshman Criminal Justice major,...

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Students influence Belton economy
Feb08

Students influence Belton economy

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells UMHB has been an integral part of the economy of Belton since its arrival in 1886, after it split from Baylor College in Independence. Now, UMHB brings in an undergraduate campus enrollment of 3,900 students and employs about 400 full-time faculty and staff. Though Belton may be small, with its population of just over 19,000 residents, it has a thriving small business economy and bustling downtown. While there are plenty of places to spend your money here in Belton, there are some local landmarks that stand out to UMHB students. Starbucks While also bearing an on-campus location, UMHB’s Starbucks does not have a full menu and leaves some students still craving their caffeine fix. The first Starbucks in Belton, located off of I-35 South and Head Rd., has only been open for four years, and is amazingly the only Starbucks between Temple and Round Rock. This circumstance paired with UMHB students makes for a crowded coffee shop, according to barista Jeremy Kudlac. “We are one of the busiest stores in the area,” Kudlac mentions as he quotes figures between $4000-$7500 per day. “Our busiest time of the year is when the semester first starts and when it ends, and it really dies down over summer and winter break.” Luckily, the new Starbucks is less than a mile away from campus and accepts gift cards. Arusha’s Arusha’s, the cool hipster hangout for Beltonians and Crusaders alike, is the culminating dream of Tunisian and UHMB alumnus Hatem Couchane, who worked in the coffee industry for 15 years prior to Arusha’s opening. Couchane purchased the building after the previous coffee shop there decided to sell. The relaxed and unhurried atmosphere of the downtown coffee shop lends for a perfect place to study, play pool or escape the stresses of class for a few minutes (or hours). All coffee beans are roasted in-house every week, and there are over 100 tasty and exotic teas to choose from. Frosti Cones Frosti Cones, a staple for UMHB students, has served Crusaders for over seven years. Located on the corner of Waco Road and 13th street, Frosti Cones is a can’t-miss snack spot for students returning to school at the tail end of summer. Even furry companions of Frosti Cones guests get snow cones during the hot months of summer. Chick-Fil-A There is something about Chick-Fil-A that the Cru just can’t get enough of. While there is an on-campus Chick-Fil-A restaurant, it doesn’t offer menu items like mini chicken sliders or Chick-Fil-A’s famous milkshakes. Thursday nights, however, students can go to the Temple location off of...

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Non-traditional students share stories of second chances, hope
Feb08

Non-traditional students share stories of second chances, hope

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells What do a 37-year-old single mom and a 61-year-old grandmother have in common? They are both non-traditional students at the university. Whether they’re former military or just having a second act, non-traditional students ages 25 and above make-up 22.5 percent of the university population. Junior Elena Aydelotte is a single mother of three working towards a public relations degree. When Aydelotte had children, she still had a dream to go to school, so she made a deal with her husband. She would stay home with the children until the youngest started school and then she could attend college. Before this deal could come to fruition, Aydelotte’s marriage sadly ended. So, she packed up her family, and moved back to Temple from North Carolina. As Aydelotte explored her next steps, she realized she had two options: go to work or attend college. The young mother decided she would explore her college options. With her best friend by her side, she walked into the UMHB admissions office for some advice. “I walked in and they’re like arms wide-open, ‘Welcome to UMHB,’ and I was like, ‘I just need an application. I don’t know if I can even afford to go here.’” She began a conversation with one of the admissions counselors and discovered that the counselor’s mother had gone back to school when she was a single mother, and eventually earned her degree. “By the time I walked out of that office, we were hugging, crying, and they were welcoming me to UMHB. I walked away with a neon billboard light going off in my mind saying ‘this is where you need to be.’” Aydelotte wants single moms to know that their story isn’t over because of the grace of God. She encourages them to reach for their dreams, no matter the hardships they’re faced with. She said He [God] has a message for other single moms too. “The dream He’s placed in their hearts is still valid. It’s not void, and they can accomplish it.” Aydelotte loves UMHB because she can openly profess her faith and learn at the same time. “The university was founded by women of faith, and all their traditions continue on, and I’m honored to be a Crusader.” Aydelotte has busy days between going to school, taking care of her family, getting homework and housework done, attending church, and somehow enjoying a social life as well. She firmly believes that having a relationship with God is how she gets through the day. “He gives me the extra grace and energy to do it,” she said. “Spending...

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