UMHB Table Tennis Club brings an uncommon sport to campus
Feb21

UMHB Table Tennis Club brings an uncommon sport to campus

The university has many campus organizations that are not as well-known as others, but are still valued by students. The Table Tennis Club is one of the smaller novelty organizations here on campus. The Table Tennis club, also known as the Ping Pong Club, has been on campus for almost two years and is overseen by club president and founder Luke Hering, a senior business computer information system major. “I used to play ping pong with all my friends in McLane Hall and we thought that maybe we could get together with more people that wanted to play but didn’t have any friends to play with. It is fun because it is a way to get away from the schoolwork and into a relaxed environment,” Hering said. The Table Tennis Club meets every Friday at 5 p.m. in the Mayborn Campus Activities Center, where members play ping pong while hanging out with each other. Members describe the meetings as casual, relaxed, and entertaining all at the same time. Milana Vockovic, the club’s vice president, is a sophomore graphic design major who joined the club in the fall of 2017. “I didn’t know that the club was a thing until I was playing ping pong with my friends and I was like ‘we should start a club.’ Later, when I looked on the club roster, I found out we already had [a club], so I joined and became more involved,” Vockovic said. “It’s hard because we don’t have a lot of access to more ping pong tables and it is such a confined space. But we hope to expand in numbers and equipment.” Dr. Kaleb Heinrich is an Assistant Professor in the Biology Department who sponsors the club. “Early on I had a handful of them in lab and they had talked about getting together to play ping pong. We started meeting normally to do it and I then encouraged them to make a club,” Heinrich said. “The professional clubs are important but relative to that this club is very relaxed and very inclusive. Anyone of any level can come, we have even had staff and faculty come and play with us as well.” There are around thirty members and the meetings usually consist of two to ten people. John Swords is a sophomore business management major who comes to the club meetings often. “I was talking to Luke about tennis when Luke introduced me to the table tennis club and said I should try it out,” he said. “I enjoyed the thrill of the game and how it is fast paced, and it requires hand-eye coordination. It is a...

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Black Panther: The movie that’s taking the nation by storm
Feb21

Black Panther: The movie that’s taking the nation by storm

Black Panther, one of the most anticipated movies of the year, is revolutionizing superhero movies and carving a path for more movies like it. The film was released into theaters on Friday Feb. 16, with some theaters showing screenings the evening before to help make room for eager audiences. African American director Ryan Coogler oversaw the movie’s production, and the movie has a mainly black cast. Coogler focuses on bringing authenticity to the marvel cinematic universe by incorporating different parts of African culture into the world of the Black Panther. Coogler brought in consultants who are experts on African history and politics to work on defining Wakanda— a fictional African nation in the film that comes from the real Wakamba tribe of Kenya. The fighting used inthe film is based on African martial arts. With the use of real world cultures in a fantasy world, fans were ecstatic when news of the films production was released (IMBD.com). With preorder ticket sales and box office sales were estimated to be around $218 million in its first weekend (Nytimes.com). It was predicted that this would be enough to make Black Panther the fifth highest opening weekend in the history of Marvel Studios, and could break the current record for the President’s Day box office sales (comicbook.com). According to NBC, the film is now the first highest opening weekend for Marvel movies. On Jan. 10, 2018, after tickets were made available for presale, Fandango’s managing editor, Erik Davis, tweeted that the movie’s first 24 hours of advance ticket sales exceeded those of any other movie from the Marvel Cinematic Universe (Nytimes.com). This, however, came as no surprise seeing as how the movie’s teaser—not the full trailer for the movie, reached 89 million views in just 24 hours. For a short time there was even a “Black Panther Challenge” which was an online fundraising effort to help kids in Harlem see the movie. Ellen DeGeneres helped push the challenge and it blossomed to include more than 300 fundraisers aiming to send thousands of young fans to the theaters (Cbsnew.com) People all over America gathered to watch the film’s early release in select theaters nationwide, including Temple’s Cinemark. Junior graphic design major, Chriscina Lampkin, saw the early showing of the film with a group of friends, having preordered tickets over a month before. “I’ve seen a lot of Marvel movies and [The Black Panther] was good in many ways,” Lampkin said. “The movie impacted me positively because it is good to have representation. And the roles are usually flipped in every other movie, having a majority of the major roles being white with a...

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John Hancock: A unique professor
Feb21

John Hancock: A unique professor

In his time working at UMHB, professor John Hancock has become notorious for his unique characteristics and teaching style.      In his time working at UMHB, professor John Hancock has become notorious for his unique characteristics and teaching style.       For example if a student walks into his class late, they will hear commentary from him that provides a laugh, such as: “And that, class, is how to win 1 million dollars. Oh hello, I can’t believe you missed that.”  Junior graphic design major, Mikala Mulligan said, “Like a lot of other art professors I’ve known, he has that blunt sense of humor, but he doesn’t come off as completely sarcastic,”  “It’s very humorous and it’s fun to play along with. It’s a fun experience. Don’t come in with common sense, just don’t.” Professor Hancock was first introduced to the art world by his brother in college. After experiencing making a print for the first time, he switched to being an art major and never turned back. After graduating, he taught for a while as a sabbatical replacement at Oklahoma State University. Then Hancock worked as a commercial artist in Waco and later moved to the Belton area. See Art, pg. 3Working on his own for some time, he had grown close to those in the art community, such as department chair of the art department, Hershall Seals. While out grocery shopping one day, he bumped into Professor Seals.“I saw Hershall at the grocery store and he asked me if I still made baskets and knew how, so he said: ‘here, teach fiber arts,’” Hancock said. “I was an adjunct, so I’d work my commercial art job then after clocking out I’d teach for a few hours. Then I just stuck, and here I am now.” While at the university, Professor Hancock has made a lasting impression with many of the students. His humor is a mix of sarcasm and satire, and he can often be spotted around the art department in a dark smock, carrying his brown coffee mug. Even more iconic: his unruly hair. His caring nature is also widely appreciated. “It’s been a pretty unusual class experience, I’d have to say.” said Junior Graphic Design Mikala Mulligan when asked about her experience as a student of Hancock’s. “Usually there’s the syllabus and set times for things, but his classes are more of a learn how to craft things yourself instead of him having to tell you how to do it.” “I think Professor Hancock is an impactful teacher.” said Nan Dickson, former dean of the art department. “It’s just him. He is creative, talented, brilliant and caring. He...

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UMHB hosts annual  Writer’s Festival
Feb21

UMHB hosts annual Writer’s Festival

This year’s Windhover Writer’s Festival featured writing styles from poetry to prose and hosted three keynote writers, as well as a songwriting duo, who presented their work with readings. Each author also hosted a workshop for participants to help sharpen their writing skills, since the idea of the festival is to motivate writers of all levels and skill sets.This year’s Windhover Writer’s Festival featured writing styles from poetry to prose and hosted three keynote writers, as well as a songwriting duo, who presented their work with readings. Each author also hosted a workshop for participants to help sharpen their writing skills, since the idea of the festival is to motivate writers of all levels and skill sets.The festival was hosted on Feb. 14-16 in Bawcom Student Union at UMHB. It is named after the journal, The Windhover, which has been around since 1997, according to the journal’s editor and associate professor of the English department, Dr. Nathaniel Hansen. Writer Suzanne M. Wolfe of England, who now resides in Seattle as a Writer in Residence at Seattle Pacific University, was one of the presenters. Wolfe’s writing inventory includes book, essays, and blogs. Wolfe is a well-acclaimed Christian writer. Her fiction novel, Confession of X, was based partially on her travels with her husband. Wolfe’s workshop gave attendees tips and pointers regarding fiction writing. The second presenter was Amy Peterson. Peterson is a writer and an adjunct professor at Taylor University. Peterson’s works have been featured in a wide variety of journals and her book, Dangerous Territory: My Misguided Quest to Save the World. Peterson’s writing can be raw and honest, but it truly encompasses her Christian background.   See Festival, pg. 3          Her workshop specialized in nonfiction. The third presenter was Thom Caraway. Caraway is an associate professor at Whitworrth University. Caraway is also the editor-in-chief for Rock&Sling, a journal of witness. He also founded and publishes of Sage Hill Press. His poems have been featured in a many journals throughout the country and his workshop focused on poetry. His reading was interesting and kept the audience entertained as he read some of his best poems. Still on the Hill was the featured musical duo, which makes do with a wide variety of traditional instruments from the Ozarks, such as the banjo, fiddle and harmonica. Still on the Hill hosted a writing workshop as well as a concert on Thursday night.  The addition of music to the Writers’ Festival was a great touch. Many students enjoyed hearing the band play their unique style of music. A slew of writers from all over the country to serve as panelists. Authors included Elizabeth Dell, Chris...

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Nurses utilize simulation lab at UMHB
Feb21

Nurses utilize simulation lab at UMHB

In order to prepare nursing students for the clinical setting, the Scott and White College of Nursing has implemented three unique components that make up the Clinical Simulation Learning Center. These components include a skills laboratory, a standard clinic, and a simulation hospital. Each component is crucial in helping students to gaining experience and confidence in their skillset in order to grow into a successful professional nurse. The first component is the skills laboratory, which contains mannequins for students to learn, practice and perfect their clinical skills with. These labs are open for students throughout the week, with nursing faculty present to assist with teaching and evaluating students’ technique in clinical skills. “The skills lab is a relaxed setting in which students can really just become better in preforming all sorts of nursing skills,” junior nursing student Clarissa Canchola said. “As student nurses, we are often evaluated in our skillset, which can be very stressful. So it is very helpful to have an easy-going place for us to just practice and ask questions.” The second component is the patient clinic, which emulates a doctor’s office. The purpose for this clinic is for students to be evaluated in a more formal way, with faculty and other students who act as patients. The student nurse is then able to perform a wide variety of skills, including basic skills such as vital signs and a full health assessment, along with medication administration. “The environment of the practicums that take places in the clinic area make it seem like we are actually working as nurses in a health care setting,” sophomore nursing student Bennett Cardoso said. “We have to verbalize everything to our instructors, which will help us when we are at the hospital to explain the procedures step by step to our patients to help them feel more comfortable. Knowing these practicums are an essential part of our grade, we have to practice and make it perfect. This will help us in the future to use our assessment skills in real life. Practice definitely makes perfect.” Finally, the third component, which is the most advanced and realistic educational tool, is the simulation hospital. Each semester, students in each level of the nursing program have the opportunity to apply their skills to a life-like situation. These simulations each have a different concept that they cover and the nursing students work together in groups to provide care to mannequin patients. However, these mannequins are unique in that they can be controlled by the nursing faculty to do different things. The students must figure out how to deal with a wide array of situations, which...

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Dr. Randy Dale campaigns for Bell County’s 264th District Judge seat
Feb21

Dr. Randy Dale campaigns for Bell County’s 264th District Judge seat

From being a Hardin Simmons graduate to spending two years in Afghanistan teaching law, to becoming an adjunct professor at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, Dr. Randy Dale is looking to add Bell County’s 264th District Judge to his list of accomplishments. Dale grew up in Memphis, a small farming community in the Texas Panhandle. He graduated from Hardin Simmons in 1976, and received his law degree from St. Mary’s University in San Antonio in 1979. He also holds a master’s degree from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, and a Ph.D from Texas State University. Dale believes that part of what made him want to become a lawyer stemmed from being raised by a former highway patrolman. “My dad was a highway patrolman before I was born,” he said. “You can take the person out of the law enforcement, but not the law enforcement out of the person. He drove a truck for a living, but I was raised by a highway patrolman. I had that kind of law-enforcement-follow-the-rules-be-held-responsible kind of mentality.” Dale began teaching classes at UMHB almost 10 years ago. Originally he taught Business Law for the McLane College of Business, but as of last year he is now teaching classes for the criminal justice department too. “I am a product of a small Baptist school. I love the kid that kind of school draws, the faculty it draws.” After teaching at UMHB for two years, Dale got the opportunity to go to Afghanistan with a private corporation to teach the rule of law system to Afghan government officials. “We held classes that we invited them to. We talked about evidence, procedure, and all elements of criminal justice,” Dale said. “They would come to our class because they would get $5 a day for going. For a three day class, 15 American dollars was a bunch of money to them, so they would smile and listen, but they weren’t going to make any changes.” Dale made his career as a trial prosecutor at the Bell County Justice Center after returning from Afghanistan. He also got his job back at UMHB. “I’ve always loved prosecuting. I’ve always loved being on the side that brings the case and tries to hold people responsible for their conduct,” Dale said. Dale is now campaigning for the 264th District Judge seat to replace former Judge Martha Trudo, who retired a year before her term was to end. Dale was approached by several defense lawyers in the area, who thought that he should run for the position. “I went home, talked to Melinda, and we prayed about it. The more we thought and talked...

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