Homecoming week brings joy to campus
Oct23

Homecoming week brings joy to campus

Homecoming. It’s a time for celebrating the past, living in the moment and excitement for the future.   During the week leading up to homecoming weekend, students participated in a sand volleyball tournament and hung out at Fest-of-Fun. They also spread out their blankets on the field at Crusader Stadium and bundled up to watch Little Giants.   The weekend officially kicked off on Friday evening with an alumni dinner in Millennium Oaks Park. After dinner and a carnival, alumni, students, parents, faculty and staff headed to W.W. Walton Chapel to watch Stunt Night and the crowning of the 2014 Homecoming king and queen.   Senior international business major Johnathon Kendall and senior interdiciplinary studies major Sarah Payne were voted by the student body as this year’s royalty.   Payne said being voted queen is “really overwhelming.”   “I wasn’t expecting this, and I certainly can’t describe how it feels right now. But it’s really great to know that UMHB students care about each other and these opportunities are available to us,” she said.   Stunt Night is a competition between all four of the classes that incorporates a skit and original song within a theme that is selected by each year’s Steering Committee.   Senior Katelyn Holm has been a director all four years for her class.   “I cant even begin to describe was Stunt Night has meant to me over the years…. I’ll never forget sitting around a table freshman year, trying to write an award-winning script with strangers. Then I look at us now, doing this production with the same people, some of my closest friends. It’s amazing. I’m so proud of my class,” she said.   The freshmen portrayed the story of Jacqueline and Aaron as they went through their first year at UMHB.   While they came across some bumps in the road, the class found they could do anything in unity.   The sophomores performed their rendition of Horton Hears a Who where Horton encourages his jungle friends to believe in something they can’t see—Cruville.   The junior class told the story of Ted who works so hard to win everything on campus to get a girl’s attention, but ends up losing his friends in the process. Ted eventually learns his lesson and finds that winning isn’t always everything.   The seniors performed a tribute to UMHB and told the story of Alec, a senior who is afraid to leave the university he loves so much. In the end, Alec finds that there’s a time to move on.   The senior class walked away with awards for best costume, song, dance and...

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‘Sader serves local ministry strokes of genius
Oct23

‘Sader serves local ministry strokes of genius

Stoke by stroke, the artist layers rich colors of paint on a massive wall. Alternating between sitting, standing and climbing a ladder, he works for hours at a time on a mural of Jesus flanked by his followers.   Sophomore graphic design major Edgar Ortiz embarked on a daunting creative mission after being chosen by Hershall Seals, chairperson of the art department at the university.   “Dr. Chuck Taylor … former UMHB faculty member and volunteer for Christians Touching Lives for Christ called me … to consider re-designing the old mural,” Seals said.   Taylor presented a challenge: Creating a life-like depiction of Christ on the wall of CTLFC, a local food and clothing bank located in Temple.   The organization wanted a visual representation of their group’s mission and decided to commission a talented, local artist. They then decided an image of Jesus helping others would effectively convey their own purpose, as well allude to the faith behind their cause.   Seals said, “Edgar Ortiz made his talents known his freshman year, so his talent and proven work ethic made him an ideal artist for the mural.”   After being selected by administration, Ortiz followed the requirements set before him, choosing an existing work to model his own after, and taking the wisdom of Seals to heart.   “We collaborated on a design … and worked together one evening to draw it on the wall, and Edgar took it from there,” Seals said.   By adding more dimensions, changing the background and elongating the piece to fit his work space, Ortiz made the painting his own. And though he didn’t choose the subject matter himself, he effectively expressed his own taste through the work.   “I did have freedom in what style I wanted to paint it. I’ve always liked to be as accurate and realistic as I can, but have also liked to use lots of color, with dark shades,” Ortiz said. “Although I painted another painting, I still had lots of fun in challenging myself to make my own version of an already-excellent painting. I learned a lot by looking at the colors in the original work and how they were used.”   Ortiz began the project this summer and continued to work throughout the semester when he wasn’t attending class or working.   After a total of 15 days consisting of three to eight hours each, the Bible story came to life.   The 80 hours of work paid off, and Ortiz expressed his happiness with the product.   “The most difficult part of the painting was getting the right colors for the faces and...

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Americans: Virus victims or victors
Oct23

Americans: Virus victims or victors

Thomas Eric Duncan’s heart rate plummeted into the 40s. Time of death: 7:51 a.m. He was the first Ebola victim on U.S. soil.   Within a week, two Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital nurses, two of about 70 caring for Duncan during his time there, were confirmed to have the virus.   The fight is on. Is America ready?   President Barack Obama said Sept. 16 that the chances of Ebola reaching the U.S. were “extremely low.”   Wrong.   There’s no full-proof plan to combat Ebola.   America is unprepared, not only for Ebola, but other viruses as well.   The 2009 H1N1 influenza outbreak proves poor anticipation by our nation’s public health officials. Press reports of Mexico’s “late flu season,” should have sounded an alarm. Yet, H1N1 had already crossed our borders before action was taken.   There’s also enterovirus D68. Medical professionals deem it a medical mystery. EV-D68 has spread across 46 states and the District of Colombia. It has affected nearly 700 people and The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed EV-D68 has claimed five lives so far. Some believe the virus causes paralysis, but the CDC has found no evidence to prove this theory. EV-D68 has affected more Americans than Ebola, and we are still scratching our heads over this once ‘rare’ virus.   The United States isn’t only to blame. The World Health Organization shows itself as more interested in politics than aid. Just last month, the group failed to recognize Ebola’s death agenda. Their major health concern: electronic cigarettes.   For America to emerge victorious in the fight against pandemics, we must look inward. Why have we not developed a vaccine to counter Ebola in humans when the National Institutes of Health announced the development of a vaccine proven to prevent the virus’ infection in monkeys in the year 2000?   Arthur L. Caplan, head of the Division of Bioethics at New York University Lagone Medical Center, wrote in an opinion for NBC news that “if you live in … any developed country you do not have to worry about Ebola.”   He went on to write: “Medical authorities know that it is very hard to transmit Ebola, that those most at risk live in nations that lack gloves and moon suits and quarantine facilities and that it is the brave doctors and nurses who treat patients with Ebola in resource-poor conditions that are at the greater risk.”   Then why did the two nurses contract the virus? Will an investigation show breaches in CDC protocols?   What if she complied with all protocol and used her “resources” correctly?   The United...

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Anti-abortion: life for all
Oct23

Anti-abortion: life for all

Recently, I was reading in the Huffington Post’s religion section, and the Sept. 11 edition had an article I just had to read.   Rabbi Aaron Alexander, a frequent writer for this section, released an article titled, “Stop Calling it a Anti-abortion Movement or Become One.” You can go read the article if you wish, but in short, Alexander calls out the anti-abortion movement and he states some issues he has.   Among other suggestions, Alexander says that the anti-abortion movement should actually work with organizations like Planned Parenthood. Near the end of his article, Alexander says that we, as a group, should be willing to compromise with other abortion clinics.   This made me stop for a second. For the past six years, I have been adamantly anti-abortion. I have worked for the cause and done all I can do to spread the message of sanctity of life. Now, Alexander calls into question the anti-abortion cause and the values behind our ideals.   Alexander, in his article, does what many prominent pro-choice people often do when he uses and abuses the logical fallacy of red herrings when he says the anti-abortion movement needs to focus on issues outside of what the group is about.   Is the idea of loving people and doing everything we can to help people who are poor or hurting important? Absolutely. Anyone who identifies himself with the anti-abortion movement would easily say that he also wants to love people and help people.   This is a common misconception about the group today; people think anti-abortioners don’t care about people once they are born, they only care about the baby and making sure it isn’t aborted.   While fighting against abortion is easily the most commonly discussed section of the anti-abortion movement, it isn’t the only one, and I would argue that it isn’t the most important. I would argue that there isn’t a most important part of the movement.   We do believe that life is sacred from the point of conception to natural death. Why would one part of life be more important than any other part? It isn’t. That is what we are about.   Because the awareness for the sanctity of life is more prevalent, adversaries are more prevalent as well.   We need to know how to recognize and debunk arguments such as the ones Alexander is making. We need to realize that there is no room to compromise when it comes to the sanctity of life and finally get up and take a...

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Houston, we have a problem
Oct23

Houston, we have a problem

Houston. That humid, traffic-ridden landmass that swallows up a great portion of Southeast Texas. The country’s fourth largest city is home to more than two million people and a controversy called the Houston Equal Rights Ordinance, also known as HERO.   A nickname is the “Bathroom Bill.” It reinforces the idea that no one should be discriminated against on basis of race, religion or sexual orientation. Pretty routine, right? Until the reader learns that the city’s bathrooms are now non-discriminatory.   Over the summer, a group of pastors who take objection to their lesbian mayor’s bold move passed around a petition, which gained more than the minimum number of signatures to have the ordinance reviewed.   The city found that a large number of the signatures were “ineligible” and refuses to discuss how it came to that conclusion. Those pastors are now in a legal battle with the city, which took an unexpected turn when the city called for their sermons to be brought before the court.   “Mayor Parker agrees with those who are concerned about the city legal department’s subpoenas for pastor’s sermons….,” Chief Policy Officer Janice Evans told The Bells. “Neither the mayor nor city attorney … were aware the subpoenas had been issued…. Both agree the original documents were overly broad.”   After that, news reports surfaced about a tweet from Parker’s Twitter account that contradicted this statement saying, “If the five pastors used pulpits for politics, their sermons are fair game. Were instructions given on filling out anti-HERO petition?”   So, which is it? Does Parker “agree with those who are concerned” about a breach of First Amendment rights, or does she in fact see the subpoena of sermons as an aid in her legal case?   When Evans was confronted with the contradiction, she responded saying, “We believe the petition process used by the HERO opponents, including the pastors, did not meet the requirements…. That information would be very helpful in proving our case.”   After a similar sentiment was expressed in a news conference, the city did some major backtracking in response to national news coverage and condemnation from politicians.   “The city’s subpoena of sermons and other pastoral communications is both needless and unprecedented,” Christiana Holcomb, the attorney representing the ministers, said.       “Political and social commentary is not a crime; it is protected by the First Amendment.”   In keeping with her theme of non-discrimination, Parker should subpoena an Imam’s sermon. Quranic passages say homosexuals should be killed. Why pick on...

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Lecture translates well with students
Oct23

Lecture translates well with students

William Carey never received the equivalent of a high school or college education. But he has translated the Bible into six different languages.   The department of Christian studies hosted the first installment of the Manning Chapel Lecture series Oct. 17.   The stained glass windows in the chapel are dedicated to several great missionaries and are indicative of the giving of the Great Commission in the Gospel of Matthew. The lectures will focus on the evangelists honored in the windows.   “The unique aspect of this chapel are the four Baptist missions windows around you — a part of what that great cloud of witnesses which the New Testament book of Hebrews says surround us,” Dean of the College of Christian Studies Dr. Timothy Crawford said as he opened the address. “These lectures are being offered to tell the stories of these people celebrated and remembered in these windows.”   Professor in the department of Christian Studies Dr. Carol Holcomb took the podium next to welcome the guest lecturer Dr. David Bebbington. His lecture was about William Carey, to whom the back left window commemorates.   “He is indeed a distinguished professor and we are very grateful that he is able to take time out of his busy schedule and join us here to talk about William Carey,” Holcomb said.   Expert on the life of Carey, Bebbington jumped into his lecture after some quick jokes about the university, Baylor and Judge Baylor’s bones.   Carey, recognized as the father of modern missionary work, influenced the Baptist Missionary Society. His zeal for missions at the time was different from English Baptists, many of which thought evangelism was pointless.   The self-taught man formed the BMS and then moved to India, where he began his missionary work. It was here that Carey began working on translating the Bible into six languages.   For seven years, he had no converts. But the work took root and Carey and his team began to start churches in India.   Bebbington spoke in depth about the work and life of Carey. He also talked about his influence on American Baptists.   “He was a marvel to the American,” Bebbington said. “The Philadelphia Baptist Association, the best organized organization in America, soon gave him some … support. In 1810 the American board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions was established. Its first missionary to India was Adoniram Judson.”   Senior Biblical studies major James Williams attended the lecture and really liked the additional information about Carey’s personal life, which Bebbington was able to relate.   “You can tell that he actually knows what he’s talking...

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