A Message by Student Body President Garrett Smith

Fellow Crusaders…  As you all know, we are facing extremely challenging times in our efforts to combat our Nation’s outbreak of the Covid-19 virus.  This is an all-out war against an invisible enemy that knows no boundaries.  Therefore, it is up to each of us as student members of the “Crusader Family” to do our part to win this war. We must do what is necessary to protect one another, as well as our dedicated “Crusader Family” administration, faculty and staff.  I challenge each of you to do the following: 1) Wear a mask; 2) Practice social distancing; 3) Practice recommended hand hygiene; 4) Avoid large gatherings; and 5) Seek Covid-19 testing if symptomatic.  Our ability to remain an on campus “Crusader Family” depends on it.  TOGETHER WE CAN AND MUST DO THIS… “GO...

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Three tips for incoming freshmen

By C.J. Halloran College is a scary and exciting time in every high school graduate’s life. Independence, the new friends, and the new classes can all make or break a college student’s experience. Coming from high school, college can present itself as an unexplored land of opportunities. In order to get the best out of these opportunities, finding a guide or at least some advice is an absolute must. These are three tips that might be helpful: 1. Beware of Procrastination Unlike in high school, nobody is here to push you or make sure all your work is done. It can become very easy to completely forget about homework and spend all your time with your friends or at different activities. Your professors will not let you know when things are due, they just assume you know based on the syllabus and website, so it is imperative that you organize your time properly and stay on task. “Coming into college, I wish I would have known that procrastination would be my biggest enemy.” Junior Marissa Zermeno’s words seem simple and may sound like a repetition of what your parents have said in the past, but they ring true. 2. Partake in Campus Events One of the hardest things to do when you first arrive at college is to make friends. Getting paired with a roommate you have never met before, in a hall of people you know nothing about, can be intimidating when you first arrive. The best way to make friends during that first day on campus is to sign up for Welcome Week. UMHB’s Welcome Week was created with the intention of drawing new students close to each other and having them begin making a community of people that they could see themselves hanging out with for the rest of their college careers. But new events arise after Welcome Week and throughout the semester and year, so consider attending new functions, activities, and student association or club meetings, even if they are only online during the pandemic. 3. Budget Your Food Money Regardless of how good the cafeteria food is, as a college student you will always be tempted to go off campus for food. Maybe the cafeteria is not open, maybe it is, and you just do not want what they serve that day. That temptation to go out and get some food with friends will always be there. Going every so often is not a bad idea, but every student needs to mind their food budget, because the threat of going broke by eating off campus is real.  If you decide against going to the...

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Welcome Back UMHB – Fall 2020

After what felt like a 5-month spring break, by Sept. 13, many UMHB students were finally ready to be back on campus. Quite a lot happened after the COVID-19 virus caused students to stay home.  With America seemingly becoming increasingly divided with the November election coming up and with the murder of George Floyd sparking protests across America and the ensuing conversations regarding racism, coming back to campus felt like a bit of normalcy for students returning to campus. Junior accounting major Taelyn Shelton said that she came back to school with a new perspective. “Being gone kind of forced me to realize how much about being here I take for granted,” Shelton said. “But now I feel like it’s easier to appreciate the little things ‘cause we’re all so much more aware”. Students were excited to be back on campus, even while using UMHB’s new CRUflex, the new way to take classes at UMHB. All students were invited to come to class in person while wearing masks and socially distancing from others. If a student wished, they were also able to choose to attend class on Zoom at the same time as the in-person students attended. CRUflex, also offers the option for students to attend classes asynchronously by providing recordings of all lectures for viewing at a later date. Speaking about CRUflex,, junior marketing and international business major Jared Poe said that it took him a while to get used to having to be safe on campus by wearing a mask and social distancing.  “At first I wasn’t a fan because I would like everything to be back to normal besides wearing masks in class,” Poe said. However, Poe said he felt more comfortable as time moved on.   “[I] am working out what works best for me,” Poe said. He also mentioned that his professors were very flexible in working with him. This helps him in that it “allows room in my schedule and how I manage my time,” Poe said. Organizations like the Baptist Student Ministry, the Student Government Association and many other special interest organizations also resumed their activities back at campus. Similarly, The Bells was finally able to join back up in the newsroom, with the new staff is just as excited as everyone else to be back on campus, and to begin to report campus news. After what feels to be a five-month spring break, UMHB students are finally back on campus. Quite a lot happened after the COVID-19 virus caused students to not be able to return to campus. With America seemingly becoming more divided with the November election coming up, plus...

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Safe Return to Campus Plan for Fall 2020

The University of Mary Hardin-Baylor has a Safe Return to Campus Plan posted on its website that addresses safety in nine key areas, each with information that can be found on the umhb.edu website, in a purple box at the lower left of the page. The areas of interest address safety within academics, student life, student services, student housing, athletics, and dining services. They also highlight cleaning protocols, health and safety protocols, the mandatory reporting of symptoms of exposure, and there is a section where student notices addressing these issues can be downloaded. The topic on academics explains the CRUflex plan of content delivery and teaching this fall semester that offers students three different options for participation and learning. CRUflex has already begun to offer students the opportunity to attend class, and/or attend online synchronously, or to attend asynchronously online. The academics topic also discusses the computers required and the safe use of them, and lets students know that in some cases, specific lab instructions and protocols are provided in class.  This section also lists the general safety protocols for being physically on campus, and interacting with fellow students and professors. These protocols, guided by CDC guidelines (U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), involve using masks, staying at a safe social distance, and the section specifically addresses when masks and face coverings are required, as follows:   Student Health and Safety Protocols All UMHB community members are required to properly wear face coverings or face masks: Upon entering all campus buildingsIn all common areas and shared environments on campus, including hallways, restrooms, elevators, or university-provided group transportation (i.e. vans).When entering/exiting classrooms and lecture halls andFor students, throughout the duration of the class, lab, clinical activity, etc. Faculty must wear a mask until everyone is seated and properly socially distanced in class. So as to assist in communication with the class, faculty may or may not elect to wear a mask while they are teaching. Students and employees are typically not required to wear face coverings in outdoor areas of the campus, as long as at least 6 ft. social distancing is maintained. Students are required to furnish their own face coverings or face masks that conform to CDC guidelines; plan to bring at least two to campus. Hand sanitizer and sanitizing wipes will be available in all classrooms, labs and on-campus clinical areas. All students must sanitize hands upon entering a classroom. Students who do not comply with health and safety protocols in the face-to-face class classroom, lecture hall, labs, or clinical areas will be required to leave the academic activity immediately. Disciplinary action may be imposed by the Dean...

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Super Tuesday sweeps the nation
Mar05

Super Tuesday sweeps the nation

After months of campaigning, the primaries came to Texas. Texas is known to be a Republican state, there is room for Democrats’ presence to grow in the future. Due to the high population growth of Texas, Democrats look to take as many votes as they can from the state in 2020. The question going into the presidential election is simple. Is Texas big enough for both Democrats and Republicans? Let’s look at the facts. Progressives such as Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren have been running on a platform of Medicare for All. Some Texans may place hope for such health plans. According to the United States Census Bureau, 186,000 Texans lost their health insurance, leaving the total population of Texas that was without insurance at 17.7% of the population in 2018. This was a rise from the 17.3% of Texans without insurance in 2017. Texas leads the rest of the states with the most people uninsured, making it possible that Texas could flip parties in the 2020 presidential race. Because of the rise of Democratic support in Texas, Democrats have started to target Texas in their campaign destinations. Candidates Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders and former candidate Mike Bloomberg all visited Texas in the week before the primaries. This marked Texas as an important spot in the primaries. Leading the pack of candidates in visits, Joe Biden visited Texas 16 times since the start of 2019; Donald Trump was right behind him with 15 visits. Candidates such as Pete Buttigieg and Amy Klobuchar dropped out of the race in the days prior to Super Tuesday. These former candidates, along with former congressman Beto O’Rourke, joined together at Joe Biden’s Texas rally on Monday, March 2 in Dallas to announce their support for the candidate. It seems that their support was vital, as Biden took not just Texas, but nine other states out of the 14 states that participated in Super Tuesday. Sanders took the most important spot: California. On the other side, incumbent Donald Trump took all 14 of the states, bringing his Republican delegate count up to 833. Republican challenger Bill Weld did not increase delegates whatsoever, leaving him at a total of one. De La Fuente, another Republican challenger, had no delegates by the night. The Bells polled 50 random people outside of Bawcom Student Union on Monday, March 2, from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. It was determined that while the majority of the campus is conservative, there was a somewhat large population who planned on voting Democrat. According to our polling of the 50 random people, 21 of the students either planned on voting,...

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Study abroad in London

The University of Mary Hardin-Baylor is holding an information session for its London Studies Program in the spring of 2021. The session is being held by Dr. Holcomb in Davidson room 204. The meeting is set to be on March 5 from four o’clock to five...

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