New residence hall in the plans, PAC update
Mar08

New residence hall in the plans, PAC update

Published in the March 8, 2017 issue of The Bells According to a press release published on Feb. 16, UMHB officially announced the approval by the Board of Trustees to build a new residence hall by the fall 2018 semester. The new building will reside on the north side of campus, between Hardy Hall and Crusader Way. The plans also includes a new green space between Hardy, the new building, and Burt Hall, effectively extending the Quad. The building will be three stories tall and be approximately 46,000 square feet. The building itself will contain rooms for up to 214 students. In a similar fashion to Beall, the building will be constructed so that floors and wings can be closed to one gender, allowing for men and women to reside there at the same time. It also allows for more versatility, so that they can change the ratio of male and female rooms as demanded by the numbers of each in the incoming freshmen classes. “I feel it will be good for the university to provide more of a variety of housing for freshman,” said freshman English major and SGA freshman class chaplain, Lindsey Conklin. “Overall, this new residence building will impact the UMHB community in very positive ways by giving the freshmen classes more housing options and a great new place to live as they start the next chapter of their adult lives.” In an email from university president, Dr. Randy O’ Rear on Feb. 13, he said that the new building will allow “major renovation” of Stribling Hall after the Spring 2018 semester. Neither the email nor the release mention the nature of the renovations. In other news discussing construction on campus, construction on the performing arts center is in the final stages of construction.The final project from the 2011 Campus Master Plan is expected to be completed and usable before the fall semester. O’ Rear’s email also mentions that fundraising is being done to put the the new projects in motion.The school has managed to collect three fifths of its side of a 5 million grant. The deadline for the grant is Aug. 31, 2017, and will allow the Performing Arts Center to be fully funded upon its opening. “I think the addition of the performing arts center is very exciting because it will accommodate for the growing music program here at UMHB,” said freshman psychology major, and saxophone player for the University’s Wind Ensemble Rachel Clemons. “It will be great for recruiting music majors and for encouraging non-music majors to be a part of the music program as well.” Another project approved in the February...

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Local businessman and UMHB grad supports the Cru
Feb22

Local businessman and UMHB grad supports the Cru

Published in the February 22, 2017 issue of The Bells When students get tired of the coffee prices that come with the green logo in Belton, the next stop is Arusha Coffee Co. Stemming from a weak and weary creature who upon eating a coffee bean was revived and full of energy, Arusha’s came to Belton in 2012. The owner, Hatem Couchane, brought his 15 years of experience in the field of coffee to Belton, Texas. He grew up in Tunis, Tunisia, and strives to bring the best of his culture into the laidback atmosphere of Arusha’s coffeehouse. As a UMHB alumnus, Couchane makes Arusha’s as Cru-friendly of an atmosphere as possible. “UMHB students are never an issue,” shop manager Ernst Jacques said laughingly. One look around on a busy Sunday evening will tell you that there is no doubt that college students are welcome at Arusha’s. Additionally, Arusha’s takes CruCash, which is ever so valuable in the times when you’re desperate for some tea and are out of cash. For more money-saving, Arusha’s has an app called Perka, where avid coffee drinkers can record their points and earn free drinks. Arusha’s also employs four current UMHB college students and employs a social media intern, Emily Maulding, who assists in all their online campaigns. Arusha’s helps the school in any way they can, and recently gave a small donation to the UMHB Girls’ basketball team. They also assist in various events for UMHB by hosting them with no charge and selling their coffee at discount rates. “Finals are busy,” Jacques mentioned, symapthaizing with the struggle students face. “The only thing students don’t do here is sleep. They spend all day here. We’re glad to be part of their future, and happy to be a part of their...

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First Gen students adjust to college life
Feb22

First Gen students adjust to college life

Published in the February 22, 2017 issue of The Bells With the number of college graduates increasing yearly, the number of first generation students increases as well. A first generation student is one who is the first of their immediate family to attend college. Nationwide, these students make up about 38 percent of college freshmen. Here at UMHB, 35 percent of the freshmen welcomed into the 2016 fall semester were also first generation. These students face a greater risk of dropping out of college, due to the increase in language barriers, an increased background in poverty, and loneliness. Though these factors can be difficult to combat, the university has steps in place to lessen the chance of these students dropping out. The Center of Academic Excellence (CAE) here on campus enrolls all first generation students in a program called Grades First, which notifies students of grade changes, upcoming assignments and due dates, and information about advising and financial aid. UMHB hopes to encourage and help students to graduate. “Transitioning to college was somewhat difficult for my parents because they didn’t necessarily know what to do about certain admissions and financial aid forms and such. They got help, though, and they are really pleased with my decision,” said freshman Mass Communication major, Halee Jorgensen. “As a first-generation student, UMHB has been helpful. I met with Dr. O’Rear, and he said he was happy I chose UMHB as a first-gen student, and he hopes I will call on them if I need help.” Jorgensen said she had a really good first semester and is even on track to graduate early. With her degree, she hopes to work for a magazine as a spread designer and photographer. Dr. O’Rear also hosts a dinner each year before the fall semester for all incoming first generation students, where they can meet the faculty and staff. This enables students to feel more secure about the environment they are coming into. During this event, O’Rear personally meets with each of the students, and tries to connect with them. By doing so, students are able to create a relationship with those in their new home. This then makes it less likely for them to drop out of college. “It was kind of tough at the beginning of my freshman year. I guess I really just didn’t know what to expect,” said sophomore history major, Joshua Gallegos. “I’m the first of all of my siblings not to go straight to working after high school, so it was strange for my family. They all supported me, but it was kind of nerve-wracking not knowing what to expect when starting...

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University shows love, reaches out to Belton community
Feb22

University shows love, reaches out to Belton community

Published in the February 22, 2017 issue of The Bells The Belton and Temple communities have been impacted by the university and student-led events, since the university moved to Belton in 1886. As the university grows larger, more and more students are reaching out to the community to provide help and support. Through different programs like Reaching Out and the BSM’s many ministries, the community has benefited from students’ labor and love for the town our university calls home. Students have visited places like Belton Christian Youth Center, Cedar Brake Retreat Center, Temple Animal Shelter, and Hope for the Hungry to help the community and these businesses. “Throughout the years, all the students that have volunteered have been extremely helpful,” said Dawn Hartman, the ACO of the Temple Animal Shelter, “We appreciate all the school has done.” Students have volunteered at the local shelter and have helped clean kennels, clean up the yard area, and spent time loving on the shelter’s animal residents. Recently, the campus organization Circle K went to the shelter and helped with what they could. Students also helped at the Cedar Brake Catholic Retreat Center, which is an area for private retreats for churches. At the last Reaching Out event held in the fall of 2016, 15 students painted many of the large porches on the site. The center would gladly welcome students back in a heartbeat. “We are very fortunate to be a recipient of their help. We got a lot more done with their help,” said Cedar Brake Director Brian Egan, “It is just like the verse on their shirts said, ‘Each of you should use whatever gift you have received to serve others, as faithful stewards of God’s grace in its various forms.’” Another off-campus site that has greatly benefited from the university is the Miller Spring Nature Center. The nature center is an asset to the community, so the help UMHB students bestow upon it is appreciated. UMHB students have helped mostly with physical labor at the center — removing obstacles so hikers can pass through the trails easily, and restoring the environment by planting and spreading native grass seeds. “The university [students] are the best at doing this work. It’s a partnership that we value,” said Rene Berkhoudt, the Miller Spring Nature Center’s coordinator. Dr. George Loutherback, university chaplain, said the community members often contact him praising the students’ contributions. “We get letters all the time thanking us for coming and doing and being and its put UMHB in a light to where is it helpful and not just existing in its own little boundaries,” said Dr. Loutherback. These businesses...

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Writer’s Festival  showcases Christian authors
Feb22

Writer’s Festival showcases Christian authors

Published in the February 22, 2017 issue of The Bells The Writers’ Festival is an annual event held at UMHB that celebrates the art of language through poetry, prose, visual art and songwriting. The event is a three-day series of panels, workshops and mixers that students, faculty and professional authors attend to learn more about creative writing and share original work. The event is hosted by the Windhover, a biannual publication of Christian writings that has been sponsored by UMHB since 2009. One of the featured aspects of the Writers’ Festival is a creative writing showcase, which features original works read by current UMHB students who were published in the preceding year’s Baylorian. The creative writing showcase was held on Wednesday, Feb. 15, and was succeeded by a dessert mixer and several other events throughout the day. Thursday night was the Writers’ Festival’s biggest event turnout, which was a concert from Still on the Hill that counted as a fine arts experience credit. Their album, “Still A River,” centers around the nation’s first national park, the Buffalo River. Their songs celebrate the stories that surround the area’s rich history and beautiful wildlife. The Arkansas natives, Donna and Kelly Molhollan, performed with eclectic melodies, unique instruments, and a “low-tech powerpoint” of images printed on fabric and bordered by various quilting patterns. Donna performs barefoot and flings her “powerpoint slides” on the stage beside her after the song that the quilt pertains to is over. The couple also led a workshop earlier that day with their orchestra of odd, one-of-a-kind instruments. The worship, titled Songwriting, aimed at allowing writers to explore how their work could be influenced by music, even if they are not musicians. The attending writers practiced reading their poems over simple music so that they could see the impact of spoken word to a beat, like the common practice of slam poetry. Though unlike most other musical groups that play at UMHB, Still on the Hill’s performance was interactive, carried a deeper message to campaign for the preservation of Buffalo River from a confined factory farm of 600 hogs, and unforgettable. Still on the Hill has been attending and performing at events at UMHB for over 20 years through ties with a few professors from the art department, Helen Kwiatkowski and Hershall Seals. The Writers’ Festival is a national event, with published authors coming in from all over the country, like Idaho, Kansas, Indiana, Washington, Arkansas, and others. The event has transformed from an event that is held over winter break to a period where students are encouraged to attend. Grace Rose, a junior English major, loves the...

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Manage finances wisely
Feb22

Manage finances wisely

Published in the February 22, 2017 issue of The Bells Tax season can be kind of a pain, but there’s one great reason to just get it over with– the refund check. When that money comes back to you all at once, it’s one of the greatest feelings in the world. It’s basically a paycheck made up of the money that was taken out of your other paychecks all year. But this extra paycheck makes us want to go out and use it, because it feels like extra money. It’s more than natural to take a stance like “I haven’t needed it all year, so why wouldn’t I spend it now?” Truth is, you need to treat it like any other paycheck. If you believe in tithing, 10 percent comes off the top and goes to your tithe. The next 10 percent you put away and pretend like it doesn’t exist. Call it a rainy day fund or emergency money. The rest of it is more discretionary, and here are a few ways you can put it to use. 1. Hold on to it. There’s still nothing forcing you to spend it right away. You never know when something new is going to come up, be it a movie, game or book that you’re going to need a little spending money for. 2. Spend some of it on something you really want. Most refunds are big enough for you to go out and buy yourself something you’ve been eyeballing for a while and still have some to spare. 3. Treat yo’ self. The view that a refund is entirely disposable income may be wrong, but it’s still your money and you’re an adult. You get to make your own decisions. Go out with friends, on a date, or spend a little money on yourself. It’s not something college students get to do incredibly often. 4. Invest some of it. Maybe you don’t know anything about investments, but someone you know probably does. You can ask a parent, grandparent, teacher, or someone you know who can help you make a wise investment. It’s a better idea than just blowing all of it, and it still leaves you some room to spend a...

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