Campus and community fellowship as one

The university’s Baptist Student Ministries has teamed up with four local churches to present ONE, a series of on-campus worship events designed to create unity between the student body and the community. ONE replaces FOCUS, a similar event that the university hosted for several years. “With the growth of local church ministries, changes in campus culture, multiple options competing for evenings, and the life cycle of events, FOCUS was fading for a couple of years,” said BSM Director Dr. Shawn Shannon. “It had served its purpose. We were officially saying farewell to it by the spring of last year.” The BSM connected with Vista Community Church, Temple Bible Church and First Baptist Church to create the worship experience. “Graciously, Austin Fischer of Vista Community church sparked a dialogue about coming together as multiple ministries as a testimony to the unity we have in Christ,” Shannon said. “The four of us met throughout the past summer, talking, listening, discerning, praying, planning, and learning to trust and delight in one another.” After laying out the groundwork for what ONE was to be, Shannon assembled a student leadership team of students including senior public relations major Katie Valenzuela and sophomore music education major Jacob Burlingame. “We were having coffee one day and Dr. Shannon asked, ‘Do you want to be a part of ONE?’ and I thought, ‘What’s ONE?’” Burlingame said. “She described it, and it was a new concept. At the time, I wasn’t really sure about it. But I prayed about it and as time went on, I eventually said yes and I haven’t doubted it yet.” The principle of ONE is that on a college campus, everyone comes from a different spiritual setting, so the goal of the event is to give students a place where they can step out of their comfort zones and interact with new people. “We each have our own church backgrounds, and some of us don’t have church backgrounds at all. So ONE is UMHB coming together to worship,” Valenzuela said. “A lot of us go to different churches, so to be able to come together to worship the same God and learn the same things in the same place is really neat.” Burlingame said it’s easy for people of faith to fall into a rut when they engage in the same worship patterns each week, but ONE is a way to break through the monotony. “You get in the habit of meeting with the same seven or eight people every Wednesday at church. ONE is a way for us to connect with the full body of Christ, not just my body of Christ,”...

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Overcome the struggle for a new you in the New Year
Jan28

Overcome the struggle for a new you in the New Year

The start of the New Year has people doing what they always do, making New Year’s resolutions. This means there’s more people in the gym and less people on Facebook, for at least the first few weeks of the year. But having and keeping a New Year’s resolution with an old schedule is a difficult task that many do not make time for. One common New Year’s resolution that often gets ditched before the first freezing temperature is getting active and going to the gym. Chase McGhee, a sophomore criminal justice major and elite level power lifter said getting in shape requires more than just a gym membership. “New Year’s resolutions are always great to get back to being healthy, but to truly be healthy and fit, it has to be a life style change. It has to be something that you do continuously,” McGhee said. Here are some tips to making and keeping those elusive resolutions. Write the resolution into your schedule. If your New Year’s resolution is an activity, writing it down as a reminder and working it into your schedule can greatly increase your chances of sticking with it. Planning ahead can help you stay on track and make sure it happens at the right time. Think of your resolutions as something important, that has to be done. By not replacing or scheduling over it, it can get done. Get your friends involved. Doing a group New Year’s resolution can help everyone stay accountable and on track. Not only does it get you active, but it also gives you time with your friends. Nobody wants to be embarrassed by giving up in front of others. Whether it’s going to the gym or emptying out your closet, friends can push you to keep at it. Done the right way, group resolutions can help achieve goals. Do not give up. According to Today Health and Wellness, “For some people, the healthy habits felt automatic after just 18 days — for others, it took 254 days.” Pacing and keeping yourself on track can help you succeed. If you are trying to save up some money, put the same amount of money aside every paycheck. It will continue to grow every month and will be rewarding in the end. Viranda Brooks, a freshman film studies major says her New Year’s resolution is “focusing on taking care of myself, growing spiritually and mentally, and just figuring out who I am.”   Start simple Make your New Year’s resolutions something you actually want. Overwhelming yourself with ones you don’t want to do or too many resolutions can lead to stress. Once you’re...

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Campus resources help students stick to resolutions

With every new year there is always a load of people who decide that the upcoming year is the year that there will be a change in their life. Like always, in January, resolutions are in full swing. The beginning is always when New Years’ Resolutions are going strong. But most people give up on their resolutions a quarter of the way through the year. This is caused by many reasons: there is not enough time, no motivation to continue it, or you just don’t know of any resources to help you accomplish your goals. Here at UMHB, there are many solutions, and the best part is that they might not cost a thing. Here are some ways to take advantage of a few of the many campus resources. Explore healthy campus dining options If you have a meal plan, you can get some great healthy options at the Residential Dining Hall in the Bawcom Student Union Building. They offer healthy wraps instead of bread, a salad bar, and often serve brown rice or couscous with lean meats. You could also stop by the Mabee Market or Starbucks for a healthy meal instead of buying another large order of fries at Chick Fil A. Take advantage of Mayborn Campus Center If you are hoping to run a half marathon or lose some weight, then, look no further then the Mayborn Campus Center. And with hours ranging from 5:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 5:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Fridays, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturdays, and 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Sundays, there’s no excuse for missing that daily workout. The fitness center includes elliptical machines, treadmills, spin bikes, pin select machines and plenty of free weights. And if you need the motivation of a fitness class, Campus Recreation offers group fitness classes at no extra cost to students. There’s everything from spinning to yoga to Zumba and many more. These classes are offered at multiple times on multiple days. Dr. Mickey Kerr, a professor in the Exercise and Sport Science department, said in order to keep up with fitness goals, students need to pick something they enjoy doing. “Pick something doesn’t feel like it’s drudgery,” he said. “Make it an activity you look forward to because your success depends on your mindset.” Take advantage of academic centers While some might be focusing on their health in the New Year, others might be making academic goals. “If this is what you would like to accomplish this year, then you should stop by the Center of Academic Excellence, CAE, or the Writing Center,” said Emily...

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Campus prepares for new performing arts space
Jan28

Campus prepares for new performing arts space

As giant bulldozer arms crushed and demolished bricks and metal on Jan. 13, the campus said goodbye to the Huckins Apartment complex that has been housing students since the mid-nineties. “Huckins is supposed to be a one week job in which we will take all rubble to the landfill for UMHB.” Said Jeff Cummings, RT Schneider Construction employee during demolitions. The purpose of the tear down is to make way for the new performing arts center that is set to be finished in the fall of 2017. Although plans for this new center have been a long-time coming, associate dean of Student Development, Donna Plank, said that the demolition couldn’t take place until there was room for displaced students in other campus housing. “We had a meeting with the students in Huckins in October concerning the demolition,” Plank said. “They were told the university would grant them first-choice housing.” The removal of the apartments left 54 students displaced. In order for the project to be completed on time, the university didn’t have the luxury of waiting until the summer when apartments would be unoccupied. “The new performing arts studio is due to be built by the fall of 2017, therefore adequate steps were needed to be taken now to see that accomplished,” said Associate Vice President for Campus Planning Robert Patee. Not only did the 54 displaced students get first dibs on where they wanted to live, but they also got a price break on their new location. “The university granted the students the option to live in the most expensive units for the price of living in Huckins during their spring term,” Plank said. The Performing Arts Center is the final installment of the university’s Campus Master Plan, which was approved in 2011. The project was delayed as the university had to wait until adequate alternative housing was available. “It was occupied, and we had to wait until College View apartment beds opened,” Patee said. Now that Huckins has been removed, the university will turn its focus to the future. A ceremony will be held Feb. 5 to break ground on the new Performing Arts Center. The facility will be 40,725 square feet and will include both performing and learning spaces, and will feature a 546-seat...

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Holocaust exhibit visits Bell County
Jan28

Holocaust exhibit visits Bell County

The Holocaust Museum in Washington D.C. has presented the Bell County Museum with the opportunity to host the first traveling exhibit west of the Mississippi River. UMHB and the museum are partnering together to encourage students and residents of Belton to attend the exhibit. Dr. Timothy Crawford, the Dean of the College of Christian Studies brought the idea of hosting the exhibit to the museum’s curator, Beverly Headley. “We were honored to help out by bringing [the exhibit] to the UMHB community, the Bell County Museum, and the Belton area.” said Headley. “It’s a great reminder that we must study history. We need to understand not only what happened, but why it was allowed to happen. It raises fundamental issues about human nature, social responsibility and the obligation of individuals and institutions to act with a conscience in the face of unspeakable crimes.” The exhibit, Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race, discusses the medical and scientific studies of the Holocaust. This exhibit examines how the Nazi’s thought about genetics and used leadership and science to help justify persecution and murder. “This exhibit is a really good answer to the question why did the Holocaust happen?” Crawford said. “The terms ‘racially fit’ and ‘the cleansing of Germany’ was often used to explain to the German citizens why these atrocities were the right things to do.” The museum shows advertisements that were posted all around the country about how unethical it was for “racially fit Germans” to marry or procreate with “non-Germans.” And race wasn’t the only thing that Germany wanted to exterminate from family trees. Homosexuals, the handicapped, and the mentally ill were also considered to have “bad genetics.” A small number of artifacts are also located in the museum showing Nazi supporters personal items. “Deadly Medicine is a reminder that it has happened in the past and it is a history we should not repeat.” said. The exhibit is sectioned into two parts. On the first floor of the museum, guests can see sciences and experiments that took place before World War II began, focusing on creating the “perfect race.” Guests can also see the famous scientists that were used as inspiration for the experiments, such as Gregory Mendel and Charles Darwin, as well as the scientists that played important roles in the experiments, such as Dr. Ernst Rudin. There are many videos that play among the exhibit to show viewers what types of tools that were used, footage of results, and small biographies of different scientists. The second floor of the museum discusses what happened once World War II began. It depicts the victims of the illegal experiments,...

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Program connects students with career mentors
Jan28

Program connects students with career mentors

The Apprentice Belton program hosted their kickoff for the semester in Bawcom Student Union in the McLane Great Hall Jan. 21. The program is a partnership between Belton’s Chamber of Commerce and the university’s career center that provides mentors to students. Director of Career Services Don Owens and the chamber came to each other with the same idea about Apprentice Belton roughly four years ago when they heard about the Apprentice Austin program in Austin, TX. “It was certainly God’s being involved and us all being on the same page at the same time that made the program possible,” Owens said. Sophomore, junior and senior students must submit an application and a reference letter by mid-October to be considered for the program in the spring semester. Once a student applies, they will be contacted for an interview by the university and chamber. The university and the chamber then find mentors in each of the students’ chosen majors. Owens believes that students should be involved with this program so they can get a true feel for their profession before they walk across the stage. “I think students should apply to get a bird’s eye view of what it’s really like in that field,” Owens said. “A lot of us have these concepts of certain careers but we don’t realize it’s a lot of hard work. There’s the good, the bad, and the ugly of every job. There’s an old saying that says if you love what you do, you won’t have to work a day of your life. We want our students to have a passion and a calling for their career.” Thirteen students have been paired with professionals from the Belton and Temple area for this semester’s Apprentice Belton. The students will be required to meet with their mentor six times throughout the spring semester, whether it’s to discuss how the student’s semester is going over coffee or to shadow the professional on the job. At the end of April there will be a closing ceremony where participants will receive a certificate and they will be able to speak about their experience. “Through Apprentice Belton, I was able to gain a mentor in the medical field who has been able to help me navigate through my journey towards becoming a physician. While I also gained many hours of shadowing experience, what stood out to me more is the practical knowledge I gained through talking with Dr. Wooldridge about her experiences in the medical field,” said senior cell biology pre-med major and Apprentice Belton alumni Autumn Brewer. Junior BCIS major with a minor in Christian studies Ashli Adams is participating...

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