Cru alumnus credits strong faith to UMHB
Mar08

Cru alumnus credits strong faith to UMHB

Published in the March 8, 2017 issue of The Bells Director of Development Kelly Boggs started his position in 2015, but this isn’t the first time. Boggs has become a part of the UMHB family. Boggs became a Crusader for life as a student in 1981 and graduated in 1985. Boggs double majored in Religion (now known as Christian Studies) and Sociology. After graduation he attended Southwestern Seminary in Ft. Worth. Prior to taking his position at UMHB, Boggs spent sixteen years as a pastor. “I was a pastor of three churches in Central Texas and one near Portland, Oregon.” Boggs said. He also held the position of the editor of the official news journal of the Louisiana Baptist Convention for nine years. In addition to that position, Boggs also wrote a weekly column for the Baptist Press for fourteen years. The university has given Boggs many good memories, but he said that the best memory was the day he met his wife. “We met during the summer of 1982 when she came to UMHB. Mindy was working in the Business Office located in Sanderford. I was working at a camp in east Texas that summer, but was on campus during a break,” He said, “I came in to say hi to Ms. Betty Bounds, and she introduced me to Mindy, who had just started at UMHB. The current Bursar’s Office is the exact spot where I met my wife. It is holy ground.” Boggs and his wife have been married for 30 years and have four children, one of whom is working on their masters degree at UMHB. Boggs feels so blessed for the opportunities that UMHB has given him, and being a student at the university really impacted his life. “I was a new believer when I came to UMHB,” he said, “The encouragement I received from students, faculty and staff in my walk with Christ had a huge impact on me.” One of the many people that helped shape him into the person he is was English professor Mary Long. “Long is the epitome of what I believe a Christian should be. She took time and helped me academically as well as personally. I will be forever grateful that God engineered the circumstances for me to attend UMHB so I could encounter people like Long.” One of his favorite things about UMHB is the friendships that he was able to make while in school. These friendships were not just limited to his peers, but to the faculty and staff as well. “Many of those relationships [made at UMHB] continue to this day,” Boggs said. There are...

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Association of Black Students hopes to unite campus
Mar08

Association of Black Students hopes to unite campus

Published in the March 8, 2017 issue of The Bells With over 60 current members in the Association of Black Students, this growing club continues to work toward one goal: to form unique and genuine relationships between all students, regardless of their ethnic background and to spread awareness of black culture throughout campus. “The Association of Black Students is a club that strives to bring the university’s diverse population as one, while also making it understandable to students what it means to be a black student on a college campus,” ABS event coordinator Nicole Ikefuna said. “It also provides an avenue for black students to interact with other races.” Ikefuna said that anyone can get involved in ABS by coming to one of the group’s meetings, paying dues, and being involved with the different events they host on campus. “There is so much to gain from becoming a member of ABS,” she said. “People can gain knowledge as to how to deal with others and be a part of a community and a family. And most of all, they can gain experiences that will help mold them into who they will become.” The coordinator said she has personally gained an understanding and love for others by being a part of the group. “I love getting to meet people from different backgrounds, and those who have been in similar situations,” she said. “I have been able to appreciate where we all come from and appreciate that we all have different views.” ABS is more than just a club, it’s a way for members to experience different cultures and gain experiences they might not have otherwise. “We put on many events throughout the semester,” Ikefuna said. “For example, with February being Black History Month, we had a keynote speaker, CJ Wilson, come and speak to us. He talked about what it means to be black and Christian. We also have many different get-together events, which are like little mixers, where all members can meet and get to know each other.” The club even has a buddy system in place, where members can find someone in the club with similar goals or someone they feel comfortable expressing their goals to. And through this partnership, they are able to hold each other accountable and make sure they are making steps toward achieving their goals. “We also have outings where we go out and do things together,” she said. “For example, a couple semesters ago we went to a STEP show and this past semester we went to the Southwestern Leadership Conference, which was a really cool experience.” The group is now working on...

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Organization spotlight: Cru Film
Mar08

Organization spotlight: Cru Film

Published in the March 8, 2017 issue of The Bells Lights, Camera, Action. Cru Film is a student-led organization for students who love being in the limelight or behind-the-scenes of a production. Cru Film president, senior film studies major Oliver Ortiz, helped charter Cru Films about a year ago. “We had something similar to it back in the day, but we totally revamped it, and believe it’s going to really help film studies majors in a big way.” Cru Film is open to all students, no matter their major. “You don’t have to be a film studies major,” said sophomore journalism and film studies major Peter Zuniga said. “It’s for whoever wants to be a part of making films.” The organization’s goal is to produce a short-film every semester. This semester, they’re in the process of filming Boys, a short film written and directed by Ortiz. “Boys is a script I was writing for fun for about a year, and my professor wanted to use it so I said, ‘alright, let’s do it.’ Then I polished it up and got it film ready.” Boys will star Caleb Latson, Aaron Midkiff, Thomas Robinson, and Ben Roark as title characters Russell, Philip, James, and Tucker. “[The film is] set in the 80’s, and is about four boys who are high school friends whose curiosity often gets them into some risky situations,” Ortiz said. “When they decide to seek adventure outside the comforts of their small hometown, the uncertainty of the real world causes the boys to split, leaving one of the four to continue alone.” Once the film has been edited, Zuniga said the organization would like to have a viewing party at Grand Avenue Theater. “We’re still going to figure out how people are going to view it first, and what the event’s going to look like,” Zuniga said. “It’ll definitely be online everywhere,” he said. Ortiz says he enjoys Cru Film because students have the opportunity to learn how to work as a team and gain experience in the film industry. “I enjoy Cru Film because it gives us the opportunity to work with a crew, gain experience, and to create interesting stories that are created by the students.” Zuniga said that the organization needs students to carry on roles that will be left empty after the end of the spring semester with Ortiz graduating. “We’re making do with what we have right now, and it’s working, but we would love to have a bigger crew,” he said. “Oliver’s graduating this semester, so we’re going to need people who want to do video editing and be more involved in...

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Towel theft epidemic continues at Mayborn Campus Center
Mar08

Towel theft epidemic continues at Mayborn Campus Center

Published in the March 8, 2017 issue of The Bells For Crusaders that frequent Mayborn Campus Center, the little white towels with a blue stripe are a common sight. The question of “would you like a towel?” posed by the attendants at the front desk begs a deeper inquiry of workout-hopefuls: Can you handle the responsibility of using one of our towels? And the answer, more often than you’d think, is no. Not only are Mayborn towels strewn carelessly over equipment and the gym floor, but they are also forgotten over shoulders and accidentally taken home. Caleb Damron, Operations Manager at Mayborn, has been brainstorming ways with his coworkers to reduce the amount of towels that disappear monthly. “We lose about 70 towels a month between the fall and spring semesters between damaged and missing towels.” That adds up to 280 towels a semester. Right now, Mayborn’s biggest defense against accidental towel theft is the watchful eyes of the front desk attendants. The campus center employees offer helpful reminders when they notice a little blue stripe over the shoulder of an exiting gym patron. “We’d like to get towel disappearances down to 20 a month,” Damron said. But Mayborn can’t do it without the help of the student body. Sophomore nursing major, Lauren Cater said she has accidentally left the gym with a towel after a workout. “I have twice,” she admits. “But I can’t take them back…it would be weird if I just brought back their towels after having them for months.” How many students feel the same way Cater does, stifled by the shame of their grievances and too afraid of condemnation to come clean? Luckily, there’s hope. Damron offers an open, nonjudgmental invitation to return the towels, free of ridicule. “If you notice you made it home with a towel, bring it back the next time you come in. And if you realize you have some at home, just bring them back.” Cater has a suggestion for Mayborn that could lessen their monthly disappearances and cultivate positive feelings about returning a towel. “I think they should have a [forgotten towel] bucket, so they can count the number of towels that are returned. That way, returning towels would feel more acceptable.” “I think that would be a great idea,” said Cater. “It would be funny to advertise for a day to give towels back.” The Mayborn staff has a lot of tricks up their sleeves when it comes to towel returns, but their biggest request is for the students to simply bring them...

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University and city  government  work together  for change
Mar08

University and city government work together for change

Published in the March 8, 2017 issue of The Bells As the UMHB campus has evolved over the years, the university has maintained a healthy relationship with city officials and local government. The university recently worked with the city of Belton to make decisions concerning building and road projects like the newly-completed MLK bridge that leads to Loop 121. “That project in itself took years of planning. A decade ago it was just undeveloped land that the city knew that one day we would need to connect this road to get traffic off of Main Street. But it took a lot of planning, coordination and securing of a grant to make it happen,” said Belton Public Information Officer Paul Romer. “The university contributed $200,000 to that project.” Romer believes that Crusader Stadium had a direct impact on the success of the MLK bridge. “I don’t think it [MLK bridge] would have been built if the new stadium hadn’t been constructed,” he said. “The new stadium is going to be used by people coming in and out, and it’s a catalyst for other projects.” The officer said the city had to prepare Belton’s infrastructure for the building of Cru Stadium. One way they did that was by putting a new sewer pipe in by the stadium to prepare for the thousands of people who would be using the restroom at the new stadium during halftime. “There had to be a change in infrastructure before that was ever built. People don’t ever think that we come in, dig up the ground, and put in bigger pipes, but that has an impact later on down the road,” he said. “A lot of times the city will do it if there’s any opportunity to connect that pipe to future businesses we’ll go ahead and run that and it saves time and money.” The university also recently contributed $100,000 to the upcoming extension of the hiking and biking trail that runs alongside the edge of the College View apartments. The path will now be extended to University Drive and then to Sparta Drive once completed. “You’ll be able to get from Lake Belton all the way to 35 on sidewalk or hiking trail,” Romer said. “I think there’s things that students aren’t aware of that are occurring because of the cooperation of the city and the school.” Romer said City Hall has had a positive experience with students thus far. Several work study students help out in different departments such as the parks department. Another work study student works at City Hall digitizing old city records. Belton’s Chamber of Commerce has also created Apprentice...

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Alex Miller dubbed  Mr. Crusader Knights 2017
Mar08

Alex Miller dubbed Mr. Crusader Knights 2017

Published in the March 8, 2017 issue of The Bells Students, family and friends gathered together on Saturday, Feb. 25 to see the Crusader Knights candidates perform in the 2017 showdown. The competition, that drew its inspiration from the Oscars, celebrated its 25th year with odes to films like: Rudy, Pirates of the Caribbean, Napoleon Dynamite, Nacho Libre, Like Mike, The Karate Kid, and The Breakfast Club. Crusader Knights has become one of the most beloved campus traditions over the years, and has come a long way from its beginnings in 1993. The contestants are now responsible for creating a one-of-a-kind introduction video to showcase their unique perspective and humor. The men are also judged on their performance in the group dance, their individual walks and their ability to answer interview questions. The contestants receive scores for each category in the competition, and then six finalists are chosen—including one contestant who is chosen by campus vote. When the scores have been tallied, the new Mr. Crusader Night is dubbed by the university president. Senior public relations major and assistant director of this year’s competition Kelsey McDaniel said you could really see the personality of each contestant come out in their introduction videos. McDaniel feels privileged that she had the chance to get to know each participant. “It was a great experience working with Cru Knights,” she said. “I’ve always been behind the scenes with it and never thought that I would receive a leadership position like this one. I loved every second of it.” McDaniel said her favorite aspect of the competition was learning about the causes the contestants are passionate about like mentoring younger students and reaching out to other communities. “Working on their minute videos with them was also fun because you really get to see behind the scenes of the production and the goofy sides and the more serious sides of them,” she said. After each introduction video, the contestant was given a spotlight question and had a few minutes to improvise a scene. Many of the contestants made the audience laugh. Crusader Knight candidates also performed three dances that not only showed off their dance skills, but also showcased their individual personalities. “I really enjoyed watching the guys perform the dances,” said sophomore nursing major, Carrena Taylor. “I thought there were really funny.” After a 10-minute intermission, the contestants were lined up and the top six finalists were announced. The top six included: First year council candidate Jacob Chesser, Senior Class candidate Alex Miller, Campus Associations Board candidate Isaac Felan, the UMHB Administrators candidate Dylan Medlin, and Freshman Class candidate Nathan Vandolzer. After the runners...

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