2016: Clinton lacks appeal to working class America

It’s been a rollercoaster last few months for White House hopeful Hillary Clinton. As the former first lady prepares for a presidential race of her own, she’s had to deal with a barrage of allegations that claim she used her position as Secretary of State to bring in funds for her family’s private foundation. Such allegations have left Clinton to seem selfish and disconnected form the American people. In an attempt to reconnect with targeted voters, Clinton announced her 2016 campaign in a way that was intended to put her on the same level as the average American.   The announcement came in the form of a video posted on Clinton’s website. The video begins with several people discussing their aspirations for the coming year: a woman prepares her garden for spring, a single mother makes plans to move so that her daughter can go to a better school, a stay-at-home mom prepares to return to work and a college student seeks her first real job. After several individuals are featured, Clinton enters the screen and announces her big next step: running for president.   The message Clinton sends is somewhat ironic considering recent events.   “Americans have fought their way back from tough economic times, but the deck is still stacked in favor of those at the top,” she said.   The Democratic Party has long been viewed as the voice for the working class while the GOP is made out to be all about big business. What the video doesn’t tell you, however, is that the Clinton Foundation has raised nearly $2 billion since its inception in 2001, with much of that coming from large corporations and even foreign governments hostile to women and other demographic groups.   If Clinton wants to relate to the working class, being indebted to the “top of the deck” that she referred to in the video probably won’t be in the best interest of the middle class.   It’s not uncommon for politicians to try to relate to voters when on the campaign trail. For instance, someone who hails from the South might seem to have a thicker drawl when speaking on his home turf, or in her case, a fake one. But for Clinton to try to place herself in the same socioeconomic status as her targeted voters is an insult to the intelligence of the American middle class.   It’s time for politicians to stop playing the “I’m just like you” card. Clinton has nothing in common with the subjects of her video. She doesn’t have to worry about putting food on the table, keeping a small business afloat...

Read More
Students recognized for academic accomplishments
Apr29

Students recognized for academic accomplishments

Honors societies on campus have started their yearly inductions of students who show dedication.   Senior social science major Jonathan Morris has been inducted into Pi Gamma Mu, Alpha Chi and Pi Alpha Theta honor societies. He serves as president of Pi Gamma Mu, the oldest honor society for the social sciences. It has 150 chapters that are active in the United States and overseas. Its mission is to “encourage and recognize superior scholarship in social science disciplines and to foster cooperation and social service among its members.”   Although Morris has only served as president for only the past school year, he has spent the most time being involved in Pi Gamma Mu.   “These honors humbled me and showed me not to doubt my abilities. I am not conceited and I had little faith in my educational career,” Morris said. “I didn’t think I was smart even though my parents always told me that I was, and that I am not applying myself to my maximum potential. While attending UMHB since the spring of 2013, and paying for my own education I was bound and determined to be a good student.”   He said a lot of his motivation to do well in school goes to his wife and daughter.   “I have a 4-year-old daughter and wanted to set a good example for her, and show her that no matter what, she can be successful in her educational career like her mommy and daddy. Plus, my wife graduated with honors from UMHB, and I had to beat her GPA and accolades,” Morris joked.   He learned the value of hard work after watching his parents overcome hardhips.   Senior Psychology and Economics double major Donavan Catron is in three honor ssocieties. He is invovled in Omicron Delta Epsilon, Psi Chi, Pi Gamma Mu. He is also a founding member of the Lions club on campus.   Being involved in these honor societies has afforded Catron many opportunities to enhance his educational career while at UMHB.   “When you go to get a job it helps with connections and helps impress future employers,” Catron said.   He credits of all his achievements his participation and to the people who have taught and helped him.   Catron plans to get his master’s degree in the future and find a job that will allow him to grow.   Morris also has future plans that involve helping the youth and being a positive influence in others’ lives.   “When I die I want my former students, co-workers, friends, and family to see me as a common man that helped a...

Read More
Easter Pageant continues to draw crowds after 76 years
Apr15

Easter Pageant continues to draw crowds after 76 years

Hundreds of students, staff and locals gathered Wed. April 1 to witness the last days of Christ’s life. Everything from his first miracle to his suffering on the cross and his resurrection from the tomb plagued the crowd with a multitude of emotion.   For this year’s 76th annual Easter Pageant, university president Dr. Randy O’Rear personally selected senior nursing major Nathan Forester and senior public relations major Jasmine Simmons to represent the life of Jesus and Mary, respectively.   “When I was asked to portray Mary in Easter Pageant, I was very honored and a little confused.” Simmons said. “When it comes to being chosen for something like that you never think that it will be you.”   Forester selected his 12 disciples, and Simmons chose seven ladies to represent her mourners for this year’s production. Throughout the year Forester and Simmons each led his and her group through practices, weekly devotion and random fellowship activities.   However, it was more than just logistical training that led to a successful show. Many of the committee, crew and cast challenged themselves to prepare outside of practice.   “Getting ready to portray Mary was a preparation of the heart,” Simmons said. “Being casted as one of the leadership roles of Easter Pageant, people might assume that you have everything worked out.”   The same circumstances applied to senior public relations major Payton Pierce, who was chosen by President O’Rear to lead this year’s production.   “A lot of that was preparing myself for the role of leadership.” Pierce said. “The Lord sort of dropped this in my lap and said, ‘Here you go! Run with it.”   While practices never proved themselves flawless and the cast and crew bore the weight of responsibility on their shoulders, each person knew that the experience continually proved itself rewarding.   As Pierce focused on relationship building and encouragement towards the cast and crew, she was able to understand the best way she could lead by example.   “I did this by giving myself grace and knowing the Lord has given me this opportunity,” Pierce said, “And in anything and everything I do, I’m going to glorify him through it.”   This year sophomore nursing major Morgan Greentree, who considers Easter Pageant one of her favorite university traditions, participated as a crowd’s member for her second time.   While she never partook in a production quite like this one, she loves being a part of this UMHB tradition because it serves as her little reminder of what Christ did for her and everyone else that day on the cross.   “We want to show...

Read More
Cru Jazz ensemble swings into China
Apr15

Cru Jazz ensemble swings into China

Over Spring Break, members from the jazz ensemble took a trip to China to perform in various cities.   The band embarked on its journey March 12 at 5:00 a.m. and returned to Texas the   Sunday before school resumed   after the break.   The band toured around Shanghai and Suzhou. They played at Shanghai Ocean University and several institutions in Suzhou. They performed 21 charts, featuring a vocalist and a UMHB faculty artist.   The trip was an educational experience for the students, but preparing for the trip took some effort. Planning started almost two years ago when Nils Landsberg, a professor in the music department, was teaching in China in 2013. This was when the connections were made and it all began coming together.   The students had their own preparations to make prior to the trip as they practiced for more than 125 hours before they left. In additon, the students had to practice individually for 60 to 100 hours.   Of course, there was some down time on the trip; they decided to shop locally, try traditional Chinese food and went sightseeing. The places they went included Buddhist temples, ancient gardens and local neighborhoods.   “My favorite part of the trip was the relationships that I got to build with members of the ensemble and make some relationships stronger,” senior music major Kory Jumper said. “…there are so many life altering views that will truly change the way you think about what you have.”   Dr. Steven Crawford was a featured guest on the drum set. He also gave lectures to the universities on the history of jazz in the United States.   The trip serves many purposes for the students, faculty and for the schools they where they perform.   “We are trying to give our music students the experience of touring internationally and sharing with other cultures our music, in this case jazz,” Dr. Crawford said. “It also builds relationships with other universities and opens up the possibilities of foreign students wanting to attend UMHB, so it can be looked at as a recruiting tool as well.”   This was Dr. Crawford’s second time visiting China for with the UMHB Jazz Ensemble, and he said the experience was amazing to be able to share and perform for people who shared the same interest in jazz music.   “We felt very welcomed to be there. Personally, being able to experience other cultures and then be able to share that with our students here in my classes is invaluable, especially in my World Music class.”   Crawford said he advises students who have the opportunity to...

Read More
Phi Alpha students presents research to peers
Apr15

Phi Alpha students presents research to peers

Most historians enjoy conducting research. The part that may seem daunting is presenting that research to fellow colleagues. However, four history students got valuable experience doing just that when they participated at a Phi Alpha Theta regional conference last month on the campus of St. Edwards University.   Phi Alpha Theta is the national honor association for history students. The conference itself included students from across the state who were given the opportunity to present research from a topic of their choosing to fellow students and advisors.   Dr. Claire Phelan of the history department said the conference is not a competition, but rather a place for students to gain valuable experience presenting their work in front of their peers.   “It’s not a speech contest or something like that, it’s to encourage young scholars to get up there and take part in this type of research and presentation,” Phelan said.   Students were allowed to research and present a topic of their choosing. Senior social sciences major Jonathan Morris decided to highlight the rich farming tradition of Central Texas.   “The project explores a day-in-the-life of a Bell County farmer from the late 1800s to post World War II,” Morris said. “My project seeks to explain why Bell County has maintained its rich tradition in farming. Using oral histories from local farmers, statistical data, and studies of the physical … I begin to answer these questions.”   Morris said the conference gave him the chance to learn the strategies of presenting historical research.   “The whole experience was a teaching lesson for me. I learned that historical works are presented in a particular fashion,” he said. “It’s not like presenting a research project to a class. Presenting historical works is a lot like story telling. You emphasize the major points you want to get across by either changing the tone of your voice or being a little dramatic while presenting the major points of your presentation.”   Senior political science and history major Chris Fix presented research on the Moudawana reforms.   “The Moudawana is essentially a system of family laws that was enacted to kind of dictate what families could do and it primarily affected women,” Fix said.   While several countries have similar family laws, Fix said the Moudwana is unique because Morocco’s geographic location makes it a melting pot of two very distinct cultures.   “In my paper, I explain the history of the laws and how the laws have become more progressive through time,” he said. “It is actually quite an interesting topic because Morocco is in a unique situation of being between European...

Read More
Bill gives college students a fighting chance
Apr15

Bill gives college students a fighting chance

An increase in campus shootings in recent years has caused lawmakers to debate Second Amendment rights. While some want to place stricter restrictions on who can and can’t carry firearms, the Texas Senate passed two laws which protect the basic human right of self-defense.   Last month, the senate passed a bill allowing concealed weapon permit holders to openly carry holstered firearms.   However, this bill hasn’t garnered the polarizing reaction that another bill has. The senate passed a second bill allowing for the concealed carry of handguns on public college campuses.   On the surface, allowing the carry of firearms on a campus with thousands of unarmed students probably seems like a bad idea. The concern is if firearms are allowed on campus, it seems obvious that there will mean more gun-related incidents on campus. However, it’s important to consider who is carrying the firearms.   The law only allows individuals who possess a concealed carry permit to carry guns on campus. These are individuals who have gone through a course on how to safely carry and operate a handgun. Licensed individuals who legally carry firearms are almost never the suspects in gun-related homicides. These individuals carry weapons for self-defense purposes, which would be the case if someone were to open fire on a campus.   Another thing to consider is that prohibiting firearms on campus is not going to discourage an individual who has the intent to use one illegally. If someone has the intent to kill, a sign that says “no firearms” isn’t going to make them turn away. The threat of a hefty fine or significant prison time won’t matter either for someone who will likely end up taking his own life after taking the lives of others.   With that being considered, it would make sense to give individuals who legally own and know how to responsibly operate a weapon the ability to defend themselves and others in the event that someone opens fire on unsuspecting students.   The idea of guns on campuses is unsettling for everyone. But outside of putting up fences and having metal detectors at every entrance, there’s no way to completely prevent unstable people from doing terrible things with a weapon.   So, instead of leaving students like sitting ducks to be picked off one by one, it makes sense to give them the option to save their lives and the lives of other innocent...

Read More
Page 29 of 204« First...1020...2728293031...405060...Last »