International students adjust to new culture
Oct29

International students adjust to new culture

The international student population at UMHB is at an all-time high. Currently, international students make up around 10 percent of the student body, with the majority of these students enrolled in graduate studies. Many of these students are from India or China. Junior Computer Information Systems major, Bei Lui, is one of these students. She is from Beijing, China and has enjoyed assimilating to Texas culture. “My favorite thing has been the Texas barbecue, especially from Texas Roadhouse,” Lui said. But despite her love of all things Texas, it can be difficult learning new customs and culture. Lui said UMHB International Student Services has made the transition much easier. “They are very helpful with everything that allows me to stay here,” she said. “They also answer any questions I may ask.” The International Services office works one-on-one with International students in nearly every way possible. They act as academic advisors for the international students, and make time each semester to work with graduating international students. “If a student wants a driver’s license, wants to move off campus, or find a job, we help them look for one. We help them with anything they may need as long as it is within their student visa,” said Dr. Elizabeth Tanaka, director of International Student Services. “Also, for the first few weeks we have a couple of vans that run to the store and other places so they can get adjusted.” While international students are attending UMHB, many of them find employment on campus. Shortly after arriving here, Lui became a student worker in the Mayborn Campus Center. Even though she has only worked there for a short time, she has already made an impact on the students she works with. “I like working with Bei because she is fun to talk to which helps the shifts pass by,” said junior history major, Kelsey Riegel. “But I like Bei because she is sassy, goofy and Bei is Bei.” Communicating and relating to other students helps international students assimilate to US college life, and want to come back year-after-year. International students have come to love UMHB so much that the population has grown considerably over the years. “We have had as little as 12 [International] students and it has been as high as 400 [International] students at one time,” Tanaka said. Other than speaking with other internationals who have attended UMHB before, one of the most effective ways to communicate with an International student has been the university’s website. “The website is very International friendly,” Tanaka said. “They stay away from words that may seem common here in United States. Instead of saying...

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Week reflects on missionaries’ stories
Oct29

Week reflects on missionaries’ stories

Missionaries who are serving all over the world converged on campus Oct. 19-23 during Missions Emphasis Week. The week included events and seminars whose purpose was to connect missionaries and students. One of these seminars was called “Latte for the Lord” and was led by Susan and Kelly Curry. In 1996, the Currys created a coffee shop called An Tobar Nua in Galway, Ireland. They were nicknamed ‘The Jesus people’ by the locals and have worked hard to create relations with the people of Galway. “They didn’t trust us for a long time… they thought we were a cult. They thought we were going to pull them away from the Catholic Church,” Kelly Curry had said, “In the beginning it was so slow and we played monopoly in the afternoon because no one was there.” Kelly told a story of how a woman had come to them with her husband who was suffering from depression. The couple had taken a three-hour bus ride to get to the coffee shop, where they were prayed over by the staff for at least an hour. After three weeks Kelly called to check up on the man and found out that after 11 years his depression broke on the bus ride home. Junior Elementary Education major Beth Ann Earley was particularly moved by the Curry’s story and said she knows mission work is in her future. “I personally feel called to missions. I have always found other cultures interesting and there are so many human rights needs around the world,” Early said. “People don’t have the things that we have and we can do something about it.” The missionaries were also invited to speak to classes throughout the week. A young missionary spoke to Sara Billingsley’s literature class, and the junior Christian studies major was inspired by what he said. “[The missionary] graduated from UMHB and he came and talked about his Journeyman term. He served in Nepal and worked on sharing the gospel to unreached people groups,” Billingsley said, “It was encouraging to meet someone who graduated from UMHB who decided to commit to mission work. It was nice to get some advice on that kind of stuff.” Baptist Student Ministry Director Shawn Shannon said MEW raises awareness about the need, opportunity, purposefulness, and joy of missions. “We pray for missionaries to be in transforming conversations that help others connect their personal vocations,” she said. “We seek opportunities for missionaries to engage in relationships with students, staff, faculty, and local churches.” Some of the events on campus were the glow run, girls/boys night out, coffee house, the world market, and the prayer...

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Semi-colon Project brings mental health awareness to campus
Oct29

Semi-colon Project brings mental health awareness to campus

Mental illness effects everyone, whether directly or indirectly. Depression, PTSD, ADD and ADHD are just a common few that are widely known around America, but those who suffer from them often go untreated. The numbers of those undergoing treatment for mental illness has dramatically increased in the last few years, even though awareness of these issues has not increased. According to the Mental Illness Research Association, in 2015, approximately one in five adults experienced mental illness. But many of these people continue suffering because of the stigma associated with these types of illnesses. The UMHB counseling center is trying to end that stigma around campus and encourages anyone who has thoughts of suicide or hurting themselves to come to their offices and talk to one of the available counselors. Director of Counseling, Testing and Health servies, Nate Williams said “The reality of what it is in the rest of the nation can happen here. The same things that touch other places will touch us. Any small thing that we can do to try and raise awareness and then offer our services to prevent things like this from happening, that would be why we do it.” After months of researching the Semi-colon Project, a worldwide brand that shares people’s stories, Willams decided that it was time for the campus to start something similar. “The Semi-colon Project is mainly about suicide awareness… and the prevention of suicide. We learned about it, and we liked the emphasis it made. It’s an easy symbol, so when you see the semi-colon, you know what it’s about.” Williams’ main goal is to let students struggling with mental illness know there are resources available on campus. “There’s a real need to reach out on campus and to show people that we are here,” William’s said. “We want to reach out to those who are struggling with mental illness or just with another type of problem.” Senior social work major Morgan Matous used to struggle with severe clinical depression. She said that it was hard for her to reach out at first because not a lot of people realize its severity. “Depression is difficult to understand if you haven’t been depressed before, mainly because many people think you are just sad. [People would say] ‘maybe if you would just socialize more’ or ‘you have nothing to be sad for, you have a good life,’” Matous said. “For me, it was a feeling of hopelessness, shame, unworthiness and rage.” She said that it was hard to get out of bed most days, and she slept anywhere from 12 to 18 hours a day. She contemplated suicide and even...

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‘Starbucks lady’ brightens students’ days
Oct29

‘Starbucks lady’ brightens students’ days

By Starr Rivers Along with attentive faculty members, UMHB is known for its student-centered staff. Those who work in buildings such as Bawcom, Mabee, and Mayborn are especially treasured by students. They are not just employees or someone who wipes down tables or takes a Chick-Fil-A order, but they are an integral part of students’ lives. And for them, the students are just as valuable. Terry Hunt, “the Starbucks lady,” has been a UMHB employee for a decade now and her devotion to the campus and its students has continued to grow. She is a passionate Crusader Football fan who attends every home game and most away games and sees her job as more than a paycheck. “I worked at Mayborn for eight years and it was like going home, not going to a job.” She said. Terry believes her purpose here is to make a connection with the students. “The kids here are my lifeline,” she said. “My kids live in California, so being here, the kids keep me from being lonely.” Her love for the students has always been evident, and last spring she learned that the feeling was very mutual. “January 2nd [of 2015], I was diagnosed with stage four breast cancer. I was given six months to a year [to live],” Hunt said. Because of the effects chemotherapy would have on her body, she was given the choice to continue working or just rest; it was up to her. She decided to keep working. She would work for two weeks, then take a week off after treatments, and then work another two weeks and so on. But the support she received was astounding. “The students and the staff rallied around me,” she said. “The Mayborn staff started a GoFundMe account and it has helped amazingly. They took up a collection and paid my deductible on my insurance.” But it did not stop there. “They began holding special prayer meetings for me. The BSM reached out and I received hundreds of cards and letters from so many people. They are now all on my wall pinned up.” Terry said continuing to work while sick was extremely hard, and that the cancer was not just getting to her physically but mentally, too. “There were days I didn’t want to get up. And at home, when I was alone, the cancer would get to me. But when I was here, the kids would keep me going.” The students became motivation for her to keep going. They would bring cards, letters, flowers, but more importantly, they prayed. Former UMHB president Dr. Jerry G. Bawcom and First Lady Vicky Bawcom...

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Intramurals give students athletic glory

Campus Recreation is a major part of college life, especially here at UMHB. Through the Campus Rec office, students and faculty have access to four outdoor basketball courts, four tennis courts, and three sand volleyball courts, which are all located at the outdoor recreation courts, behind McLane Hall. Campus Rec even provides students and faculty with the equipment they need for a variety of outdoor activities. Some of the items that can be rented are basketballs, volleyballs, tennis balls and rackets, and hammocks. Other activities, clubs and teams that fall under the Campus Rec category are Intramurals, Sader Belles, Cru Cheer and all of the Cru Fit classes. Director of Campus Recreation, Sue Weaver, has been in charge of campus recreation for the past 10 years, and she can’t imagine doing anything else. “Every semester is different. I get to plan events, work flexible hours and I get to work with the students.” Weaver said. One of Weavers favorite aspects of her job is overseeing the various intramural sports. Intramurals have become one of the biggest activities here on campus, and are open to the entire student population. Currently the Flag Football and the Sand Volleyball leagues are in season, but there is still more to come for the fall semester. Upcoming intramural opportunities include 7-on-7 CoRec Soccer and 6-on-6 Volleyball. The Campus Rec director said anyone interested in one of these fall leagues should visit the Campus Rec website at students.umhb.edu/rec/ and click on the IMLeague link. If students don’t have time to join a team this semester, there will be plenty of intramural opportunities in the spring. “In January a new Cru Fit schedule will be released and towards the end of January all of our basketball leagues will begin which are Men’s 5-on-5, which is full court, and then half court is Women’s 3-on-3 and Men’s 3-on-3” Weaver said. “Toward the end of the [spring] semester we will also start our softball league and we will be teaming up with Student Life to put on Play Day.” There is something for everyone when it comes to Campus Rec activites. Sophomore Pre Physical Therapy major, Taylor Rose, who has participated in Flag Football and 3 on 3 Women’s Basketball, said she enjoys the time spent with friends on the field and the court. “Intramurals are a great way to relieve stress. Plus it also gives me a chance to be competitive.” Senior Graphic Design Major Elizabeth Motely, who has played 3-on-3 Women’s Basketball and Sand Volleyball, said campus rec activities give her the chance to play the sports she loves. “I think I can speak for all...

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Family weekend returns to campus

By Starr Rivers It’s six weeks into the fall semester of college and although students hate to admit it, they are beginning to miss their nagging parents and annoying siblings. In order to give students a little piece of home and give parents the chance to see what their kids are up to on campus, UMHB hosted its annual Family Weekend Oct 2 and 3, with a string of events displaying UMHB traditions. The weekend began with Museum Tours at the Musick Alumni Center. Next, parents were given the chance to meet representatives from the UMHB’s President Council and Student Organizations to get a better feel of who exactly is pouring into their student’s lives and how they can get involved. Residential halls were also open to the families to see where (and how) students are living on campus. As the sun went down, students and families were treated to the musical Little Mary Sunshine presented by the UMHB Department of Music. The annual Family Weekend Pep Rally followed, where families were greeted with snare drums and cheers at Luther Memorial. The Blackshirt Cru Spirit Band, Sader Belles, and Cru Cheer Team also performed, pumping the parents up before the big game the following day. The night ended with a Family Weekend Hangout, presented by CAB, which consisted of video games, board games, and live music performed by students. Saturday morning began with a Spiritual Life and BSM Worship Service in Presser Hall, led by the families themselves. The Faculty Brunch followed, where parents were given a continental breakfast in Great Hall. The meal gave them a chance to get to know their students’ professors. Kickin’ It On King Street was one of the highlights of the weekend. There were plenty of spirit tables, lawn games, and music to get everyone in the mood for the game. Students were also eager to show their parents UMHB’s pregame tradition of welcoming the Crusader Football team and getting pumped to the sound of the Cru Spirit Band. The last event was watching Crusader Football dominate against Belhaven University. The stands were filled with students, parents, siblings, and smiling faces. Grabbing a cup of CRUnilla and a bag of popcorn, UMHB families watched the Crusaders lead the game with ease, the score reaching 50-0 by halftime. “My brother [Baylor] plays football here, my dad Kieth coaches and my mother Shelly is the Residential Director for Farris Hall,” Landry Mullins said. “So Family Weekend is always a huge deal. The atmosphere on the UMHB campus during this weekend is one of the best.” Although Family Weekend is for parents, it is also a...

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