New manager brings changes
Sep28

New manager brings changes

Published in the Sept. 28, 2016 issue of The Bells In the few years that Bawcom has been open, there have been vast changes to try and appeal to the comfort and accessibility of the students and faculty. The new building, a building, which opened in 2014, was not only closer to/attached to the stadium, but also more spacious and allows for more people at one time to study and hang out. Former golf coach Mr. Doak Flemming has been the assistant director of Bawcom for the past year, and is seeking to make Bawcom even better than it already is. “You know, taking over a brand new building, there’s not a lot of changes. The building had only been open a year when I took over, and so we’re looking to make some improvements, such as furniture. We’re working on a project with that,” Flemming said. “We’re consistently working with food services to improve quality, cleanliness, and those kinds of things. Aesthetically, we work with the design team of the university to see if there’s anything we can add to the building. Flemming is working on a project with the Physical Plant to possibly create storage for items such as skate boards and scooters, seeing their vast popularity around campus. Many students come to Bawcom to study or eat with friends. “Bawcom is where I come to study,” freshman pre- physical therapy major Bryan Buckberry said. “It’s nice to know that someone is looking to improve what’s already a pretty nice place.” Students congregate on all three floors of the building, and are excited to see changes. “I think new furniture would be amazing,” Buckberry said. “I’m in here all the time and I know that comfier furniture for the first floor would make it easier to stay for longer periods of time and study.” Flemming also said that he has worked to make the building only accessible to students and faculty during football games. Being selective about who enters Bawcom allows students who need to study to still feel included in the football experience. These changes have not gone unnoticed, and many have taken advantage of the opportunity to stay inside the building. In the two years it has been open, Bawcom has become a local favorite, a building both accommodating and appealing on the inside. And if Flemming has anything to do with it, it’ll only continue getting...

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Self-defense class teaches students awareness on-campus
Sep28

Self-defense class teaches students awareness on-campus

Published in the Sept. 28, 2016 issue of The Bells With the number of mass shootings growing by the day, “campus safety” is a popular news topic. However, as a private university with just under 4,000 students in attendance (that’s just under 7% of the population of Texas A&M), campus safety looks a little different to UMHB. So what does it look like to be safe on campus? What are the biggest threats on campus? What are the most common crimes committed here at UMHB? How do we defend ourselves when preventative measures have failed? These are some of the questions that officers Steve Carter and Kevin Mertz answered during their self-defense class, last Thursday evening in the Lord Conference Center. “The main goal of this class is to make students safe on campus,” said Carter. The officer said the biggest danger to students on campus is self-inflicted danger, or students putting themselves in harm’s way. Carter suggests avoiding potentially harmful or illegal situations like not bringing alcohol or drugs on campus. He also suggests that students take their things with them when they leave their vehicles and dorm rooms. “The most common crimes on campus are thefts,” the officer said. “We have thefts that happen from people coming from off campus to on campus, but we also have thefts that are student-to-student.” On-campus thefts are more than likely crimes of opportunity,” Carter said. That’s why the officer stressed so heavily the point of being aware of one’s surroundings and not being an easy target. Carter also cleared up for his self-defense class that any time you enter a vehicle when you’re not supposed to, it’s considered a break-in. After the informational portion of the class, the officers gave the students a tutorial on how to defend themselves against a physical assault. Carter believes that the best defense is being self-aware and being aware of your surroundings. He uses the verse, 1 Peter 5:8: “Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour,” to emphasize his points. “Your best weapon is your mind,” he said. “Your best defense is to be someplace else.” Carter also spoke about listening to “that little voice” that alerts us to when something is wrong. “Listen to that voice,” Carter said. “Don’t ignore it. At the police department, every one of us believes in that little voice; that it is more in tune with your surroundings than you are.” As a precursor to learning basic attack moves from Mertz, he told the attendees that the class was not meant to teach you...

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Have you found your church home?
Sep28

Have you found your church home?

Published in the Sept. 28, 2016 issue of The Bells A study conducted by the Barna group shows that approximately 40 percent of college students do not retain their faith during their college years. The university not only wants to cultivate a student’s education, but also their faith. University Chaplain, Dr. George Loutherback, believes that finding a church that fits one’s needs is essential for a college student. “A local church connection is very important for community, spiritual growth, and for feeling connected,” Loutherback said. “A local church offers opportunities for ministry investment, a chance to be with peers in a worship experience, [and] a chance to learn and be taught by someone who is gifted in the ability to teach.” For students searching for a church, Loutherback suggests talking with other students, visiting several churches in the area, and picking the one that the student enjoys attending the best. Churches of all different denominations can be found in the Belton/Temple/Killeen area, most of them offering college groups for local students. First United Methodist Church in Belton even offers a home-cooked lunch on Wednesdays for college students in exchange for a small donation. Students can enjoy fellowshipping with peers and church members during this time. For those who don’t have a transportation method or simply want to worship close to home, Everyday Disciples Church has weekly services on-campus in the Bell Baptist Association. “The Bell Baptist Association uses their building as a church plant incubator for free, so we are taking advantage of the space and opportunity to be on-campus,” Pastor Rich Diaz said. Outside of finding a church home, students can grow spiritually through service opportunities through the university’s Baptist Student Ministry. Some of the ministries led by the BSM include Drama Ministry, Hospital Ministry, Helping Hands, Hope for the Hungry, Random Acts of Kindness, and Worship in the Quad. Other ministries include Cru Catholics, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, and Small groups, an on-campus Bible study organized by Temple Bible Church. “I think it’s important to get involved in ministries in college because you need to figure out how to stay rooted in your faith,” said Children’s Ministry co-leader sophomore Spanish major Rosie Sawatzki. “When you’re away from home the first time it’s easy to get distracted by all the things in the world, and we need to set aside time to be reminded who we are to Him and in Him.” Sawatzki believes that through Children’s Ministry she’s able to live out Jesus’ teachings about loving her neighbors. “Being with the kids helps me realize that I’m working towards something with real meaning,” Sawatzki said. “I get...

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Inside look at upcoming Crusader Fall Sports: Find out how your favorite sports teams are gearing up for the season

Published in the September 14, 2016 issue of The Bells UMHB football isn’t the only sport in the spotlight this fall semester. The Cru soccer, volleyball, and basketball teams are also gearing up for the season. While each team wants to win their region’s conference tournament and advance to nationals, there are also other goals the coaches are keeping in mind. Basketball The women’s basketball coach, Mark Morefield, is planning to win the division and go on to host this year’s conference. And if they don’t get the chance to host, the team aims to win the conference and progress to the NCCA nationals. “I feel good. I think we are finally starting to put our stamp on the program,” Morefield said. The coach admits that this season will have its ups and downs, but he says during this time the team will grow closer together and sharpen each other’s skills. He also hopes to improve their conference record. Volleyball This season the women’svolleyball team will also be going all out for the upcoming tournaments. “We want to win, but there’s a lot more to athletics and being on a team than just winning,” says head coach Rob Frost, “We had a lot of success on the court last season and lost in the conference championship match. We are working hard to learn and get better, and go further this year.” Soccer Women’s soccer is also on the rise this fall. The team has already played some pre- conference games, and are looking forward to representing the university on the field. At this point, the conference championship is the team’s number one goal, according to coach Barry Elkins. “We have gotten progressively better each year and currently have an experienced team,” says Elkins. The soccer team is comprised of returning players, so each player is well versed in her role on the field. They know how each other works, the coach said. The team plans on building each other up, and picking up where they left off last year. The men’s soccer team is also taking the field once again, with more determination than ever before. Head coach Brad Bankhead said the men had a rough start to the season because of rain delays. But an early win has given the team a positive outlook on the season. Forward, junior Caleb Latson said the team’s morale is boosted when the fans show up to cheer the team on. “We want more people out here with energy to cheer us on as a team,” Latson said. “ You know we are doing it for the school and ourselves, and we love...

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Remembering 9-11: 15 years after the tragedy

Published in the September 14, 2016 issue of The Bells It was the deadliest attack our country had ever seen. Thousands lost their lives, and life as we knew it changed forever. Sunday marked the 15th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, and while not everyone on campus was old enough to recall the events of that day, the attack had lasting effects that have touched every generation. “I was in college when 9/11 happened,” Professor Dr. Ted Babin said. “I had a meeting that morning for school, and when I got in the car and turned on the radio, I heard them talking about a plane hitting a building. I didn’t think that much of it, but they weren’t playing music on the radio, so I was confused as to what was going on. “When I got to the school, I waited in my evaluator’s office for a while, and eventually she comes in panicking and talking about planes hitting a building. I still had no idea what was going on, so I decided to go find a television to find out. I remember walking into the dorms and seeing a bunch of people crowding around the TV. By this time, both of the towers had been hit.” Professor Dr. Renate Hood was also going about her normal day that September morning when she heard about the attacks. “My mother called from the Netherlands and told me to turn on the television. The first tower had been hit. I was getting my 9-month old dressed and ready to go to her checkup.” Hood’s most vivid memory of the day was sitting in the pediatrician’s office watching young children running around without a clue of what was happening in the world. “We all wanted to see the news but decided that we needed to show cartoons for the children. Every once in a while we would switch the channel and quickly check if the missing plane that crashed in Pennsylvania had been found.” While neither Hood nor Babin knew anyone who was directly affected by the attacks, they both remember the thoughts and emotions they had that day. “I wasn’t really in fear for my safety,” Babin said. “I mean I obviously called my family to make sure they were okay, but it was more the feeling of uncertainty of what was going to happen next. Was there going to be another plane or was something else going to happen? And how was our country going to change because of it?” Hood had a different perspective, having come from a Western European background. “I grew up amidst terrorist groups from...

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UMHB launches all online program

Published in the September 14, 2016 issue of The Bells This fall, the university launched a new degree program called MyWay. This all-online program is geared toward adult learners who are looking to finish their degrees through Competency-Based Education (CBE). MyWay is set up so that a student pays $3,000 for a six-month subscription to MyWay. The subscription gives them access to “all you can complete” modules and assessments, which are equivalent to lectures and tests. Students are expected to finish at least 12 hours in the allotted six-month period, but are encouraged to do more. Dr. ChrissAnn Merriman, Interim Director for Distance Education at UMHB, worked closely with a team of seven to create MyWay. “This is a 20-month plus initiative that over 100 faculty and staff have helped design and develop.” The preparation of MyWay also included research of what employers were looking for in an employee. This helped the team to structure their degree plans to fit the students’work needs. The degree, labelled Applied Studies and Organizational Leadership, is a comprehensive plan that combines the greatest needs of both the students and the employers. This includes: communication, teamwork, and ability to develop their coworkers. Merriman also mentioned that MyWay is mainly geared towards adult learners who are coming back to get their degree. “There are a lot of students across the country who have credit, but never were able to finish their degree,” she said. “We’ve found that we could help the degree-completers who may have had things happen in their lives that caused them to complete their degree. So, we’re able to help.” Merriman and her team have prepared for the struggles of an online degree program, especially considering that some students haven’t studied in many years. “We’ve really set up some good tutorials for students like how to write an essay. Some of these students have not written an essay in years, so it’s important to help them identify what an essay looks like and what to think about when you’re writing them.” Instead of tests, the MyWay program assesses students’ skills by having them do projects at the end of every module. This reinforces the information the students have learned. “There are not multiple choice or short essay. These are projects they apply potentially to their business or something in their lives or something that’s happening.” The students’ progress is monitered weekly by MyWay Success Coach, Teesha Goosh. “I’m here to encourage, to support, and to interact with students, to let them know that I’m here to serve them,” Goosh said. The success coach said she lives by the model of “serve with...

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