Campus safety resources provide sense of security
Jan25

Campus safety resources provide sense of security

Published in the January 25, 2017 issue of The Bells College is supposed to be one of the best times in a person’s life. It is a time when young people leave home for the first time, make friendships and memories that last a lifetime, and discover more about who they are. Unfortunately, nothing is perfect. Besides worrying about tests and homework, there is one major concern for all college students – our physical safety. According to the University of Oregon, 17% of all college students have experienced violence on campus. The city of Belton is a fairly safe place to live. On bestplaces.net, Belton has a violent crime rate of 29.3 out of 100. Sophomore Nursing major Corey Johnson said he feels safe on campus. “I believe UMHB is fairly safe because as far as I know, nothing huge has happened,” Johnson said. Junior Education major Katelyn Leistico said for the most part she feels safe on campus as well, but she thinks there is always room for improvement. “I mean, there’s obviously more that we can do, like some of the lights aren’t necessarily working and there are definitely parts of campus that are really dark when you’re walking back, especially back to the apartments.” One great thing about attending a Christian college is that most people’s priorities are usually in the right place. A major aspect of attending UMHB is the emphasis on faith-informed discernment.. “Although there are always people who will cause others harm, I think that UMHB is less likely to have those kinds of people,” said freshman interdisciplinary studies major Jordyn Brinkman. Although UMHB has a safe environment, it is always wise for college students to know the resources available to them. Fortunately, UMHB has many tools for students to use to help keep them safe. “Through being involved in student organizations, I have been well-trained on the resources available to ensure student safety,” said sophomore Christian studies major Samuel Kinnin. “The Cru Card scanners, locks on doors, emergency poles, and constant police supervision are great tools we have to keep us safe.” The police department is also a major on-campus resource when it comes to providing safety and security. “The police department does an incredible job of making sure we feel safe through CruAlet systems and having so many policies in place to help provide safety and confidentiality among students,” Kinnin said.Officers are known for having a quick response time and patrolling campus for any suspicious happenings. “We also have a safety liaison through the Student Government Association to make sure all your concerns are addressed to the police department. If any...

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Black History Month-themed writing contest first for UMHB
Jan25

Black History Month-themed writing contest first for UMHB

Published in the January 25, 2017 issue of The Bells Martin Luther King Jr, Rosa Parks, Susan B. Anthony, Oprah Winfrey, Langston Hughes, Barack Obama, and many others. Every individual has a unique story that is woven into the dynamic history of hardships and triumphs of the black community. Each year, the United States honors the black community and their achievements during the month of February. According to history.com, every U.S. president has set aside February as Black History Month since President Ford in 1976. This year, Humanities professors Dr. Janene Lewis and Dr. Nathaniel Hansen hosted the First Annual Black History Month Writing Contest for UMHB students. Because this was the first year, the only requirements for the contest were that the entries had to be unpublished and able to be read aloud in under 15 minutes. Students could turn in entries to Dr. Hansen until Tues. Jan. 17. The winners of this contest will have the opportunity to present their work at the Windhover Writer’s Festival on Feb. 15-17. “One of the cool things about this contest is that the top three or four entries will have a spot on a panel at the Windhover Writer’s Festival,” Lewis said. “We have people come from across the country to the writer’s festival, so it’s a good time for student writers to get their voice out there.” Although there was not a specific writing topic for the contest, Dr. Lewis suggested that entrants write about faith and its role in African-American culture since this is a predominate theme at the festival. Lewis and Dr. Hansen created this contest to spark conversations about a month that can sometimes be overlooked. “We don’t do much with Black History month,” Lewis said. “This is a small way to start that conversation.”. Junior english major Guillermo Lopez chose to submit two pieces of poetry to express his views on racial equality not only for African-Americans but all races. “I entered this contest because I wanted to express my understanding of what I believe Black History Month signifies: equality despite racial status.” Lewis believes that honoring Black History Month is important because it is important to not let a topic such as race divide a country. “Black History Month commemorates numerous leaders who clarified the position African-American citizens had in the States. These leaders stood and fought for beliefs that gave African-American citizens a chance to be equal through all aspects of life,” he said. “Though the focus was on the integration of African-Americans, other minorities could also learn from this. I think the importance in writing about Black History Month focuses on reminding...

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‘Fred’ named NCAA Division III Coach of the Year
Jan25

‘Fred’ named NCAA Division III Coach of the Year

Published in the January 25, 2017 issue of The Bells The 2016 season was an amazing year for the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor football team by all accounts. The team achieved a 15-0 record, won its seventh consecutive American Southwest Conference (ASC) title and its first ever NCAA national championship. The team also boasted three American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) All-Americans and 17 on ASC All-Academic teams. The man behind this success is head coach Pete Fredenburg. As the program reached new heights this season, so too did Fredenburg as he was named the 2016 AFCA National Coach of the Year for NCAA Division III. This is the first time for him to receive this honor in his 19 years as the only coach in the history of the UMHB football program. Though, looking at his track record over that illustrious career, you would never guess that this was his first coach of the year award. During his time coaching for the Cru, the program has had an astounding 196-38 record. The program has also manufactured 14 ASC Championships, 16 AFCA All-Americans and 15 ASC Player of the Year awards, including 2016 Offensive Player of the Year Blake Jackson and Defensive Player of the Year Teidrick Smith. “It is an incredible honor,” Fredenburg said, “And the special thing about it is all of the people that it encompasses.” Although Fredenburg has all of the numbers normally associated with a great coach, it is the relationship with his players that is the true measure of the coach. His players reflect a uniform sense of family and respect, both toward each other and toward him as a coach and an overall leader—a leader known affectionately as “Fred” by his players. And they have nothing but nice things to say about him. “I think it’s been a long time coming for him,” sophomore receiver T.J. Josey said about Fredenburg. “The way he is able to mold young guys into men during the time we are playing for him is impeccable. He is a great coach on the field as we all know, but the relationship he builds with his players off the field is what really makes him the best coach I have ever had. I would just like to say congrats to him and hopefully this is the first of many.” Senior receiver Wykeyhe Walker said is very happy for his beloved coach. Walker spoke about how the closeness of the team was the reason for the ability to finally clear the hurdle of winning a national championship. “There have been better teams, but there has not been a closer team...

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CAE’s finals frenzy prepares students for difficult finals

Published in the December 7, 2016 issue of The Bells Finals Frenzy, an event hosted by the Center of Academic Excellence (CAE) and the Writing Center on the second floor of the Mabee Student Success Center. Finals Frenzy happened Thursday, Dec. 1 from 6 to 9 p.m. Throughout the night the CAE and the Writing Center offered students various resources for free. Some of the resources they offered included free tutoring for basic subjects like anatomy and physiology and writing. This was a resource that was heavily used by students. Especially at this point in the semester, when it is crunch time. The CAE’s mission is to assist students in pursuing academic excellence in a Christ-centered learning community while valuing them as individuals, and this event falls in line with this focus. Finals Frenzy is co-hosted with the Writing Center. The center offers help with basic writing skills and assistance in writing term papers. “Finals Frenzy is a way to prepare students for what they might see on their finals, and to get them in the mentality of working hard,” sophomore English and history double major and writing tutor said. Cade organized the writing center’s portion of the event by creating the various stations that students participated in during the event. Along with time spent with tutors and in learning stations, the event also included the gift basket giveaway. The basket included scantrons, pencils, Nutri-grain bars, pretzels, chocolate—and of course, coffee. They also offered free scantrons, blue books, pencils, food and giveaways all throughout the night. Cade said the Finals Frenzy isn’t just helpful academically but also financially. Between the late nights studying and the late night meals that accompany it, being able to save a few dollars on testing supplies goes a long way. Like most huge study events, it would not be complete without food. So throughout the night as students study, students also stuffed their mouths. Students entered to be a part of Finals Frenzy by swiping in. When students attended the event and swipeed in, they were entered into a drawing. The prizes for the drawing will be given away all thoughout finals week. These are just a few things that the CAE and the Writing Center have to offer. Find out how else the center can help your academic achievement, visit...

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SGA and Sodexo strive to reduce university’s carbon footprint

Published in the December 7, 2016 issue of The Bells The university has recently begun taking steps to reduce their carbon footprint. The Student Government Association (SGA) and Sodexo Dining Services are leading the way by taking precautions against unnecessary waste of food, fuel, and energy. The possibility of having to-go containers in the dining hall of Bawcom Student Union was initially raised in SGA’s annual Buddy Night in October, and the organization has since performed research and contacted Sodexo to make to-go containers a reality. However, doggie bags aren’t the only way to cut back on food waste in Bawcom. Alex Kown, student body vice president for the SGA, is looking into creating a compost out of the disposed food so it can be used as a fertilizer, which will reduce gardening costs. James Quinn, the general manager for dining facilities, shares the composting vision as well. “We plan on creating a food compost that would eventually contribute to us having our own herb garden,” he explains. “That way we’ll have our own rosemary, parsley, anything we need right on campus.” There will be quite a few new, exciting changes to Bawcom under Quinn’s leadership. For one, Quinn is replacing his senior staff with people who have more experience and education in culinary arts and dietary needs. This means that gluten-free and dairy-free options will be more abundant in the coming semester, and a larger variety of food will be offered. Kown plans on incentivizing the students to contribute to reducing the school’s carbon footprint. “Students can recycle, they can turn out their apartment lights more, and they can just walk or ride their bike to class instead of drive.” To encourage more energy efficiency, Kown intends to use a scraps program from another university. The scraps concept is that whatever money that is saved month to month on the energy bill is donated to a nonprofit environmental organization. “Since we go to a university where the students actually care about the world, it should be easy to get them on board.” Specialized lids and awareness of the strict rules that recycling demands will all aid the process of making the university more environmentally conscious, according to Kown. Student participation is an essential part of making UMHB more energy efficient. Although SGA is aware of the parking situation for students who live on campus, they would like to encourage students to walk or ride their bikes to class. Kown would like to see UMHB become a carbon neutral campus and to run on solely renewable sources. He also encourages students, if they have any other concerns or ideas,...

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Loutherback serves 50 years with college students

Published in the December 7, 2016 issue of The Bells Dr. George Loutherback has worked with UMHB students for the past 20 years and will soon be celebrating 50 years of mentoring students for various universities. At the beginning of his career, Loutherback, who is affectionately called “Dr. L,” was the director of the Baptist Student Union, which is now called the Baptist Student Ministry. Before coming to UMHB he worked at many junior colleges and even supervised the BSM at Baylor University for 14 years before coming to UMHB. Loutherback has done a lot to make his mark during his time with the university. He was the original founder of the Christian Association of Student Leaders, a specialized student life conference for Christian universities, and the beloved Welcome Week. As the university’s current chaplin Loutherback teaches his own New Testament course and oversees all chapel services for the university, including bringing in speakers that will challenge the current generation with their messages. He also helped start the revival program that takes place during the spring semester each year. He even provides marriage and grieving counseling for students who need the assistance. Loutherback also has a big role in the England mission trip that happens every summer. The university chaplain said he loves his job because he doesn’t have to follow a strict routine. . “There is no day that is exactly the same because I have different people come through that door every day,” He said. As a mentor and counselor to students on campus, Loutherback works with all students with different needs. He finds out what need they need help with and then builds a relationship with the student from there. If a student wants to work on anything, they they can confide in “Dr. L” for help. “Every student faces challenges that allow them to grow and expand on what they’ve learned before they come in to see me again,” Dr. Loutherback said. Dr. Shawn Shannon,the current director of the BSM here on campus said she respects Loutherback for how long he has followed Jesus and how he encourages others to do the same. Shannon has worked with him for 28 years, including his years as BSU director.. She believes Loutherback is committed to raising up leaders among students with whom he serves.. “One way we know what others value is to observe those things that they will do that are inconvenient or personally costly. I see Dr. L giving his time and life to develop leaders and to share Christ with the United Kingdom and to provide experiences where others can meet, commit to, and...

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