Faith important in path to healing from mental illness
Dec08

Faith important in path to healing from mental illness

People struggling with mental illnesses such as depression, bipolar disorder, OCD, and ADD may feel that having faith in God is hopeless. However, faith can play a huge role in overcoming these illnesses. The Cru Counseling Center encourages students to join a church, a local ministry or see a Christian therapist or counselor if they feel they are struggling through mental illness. Therapist, and UMHB almuna, Leslie L. Brown, MA, LPC intern, said it is important for people to discuss mental illness from a spiritual standpoint. She believes that through faith people can believe that they are battling mental illness for a reason and that one day they will no longer struggle with these illnesses. “Most importantly, those who have faith also have hope,” Brown said. “First they have hope that God is with them as they go through their battle with mental illness. Second they have hope that even if they struggle with their mental illness for the rest of their life, one day in Heaven they will be free of it. Third they have hope that their struggle has a purpose since God does not waste.” Brown wants people with mental illness to realize that medication and godly counsel are helpful tools in finding a cure for mental illness. “I believe in some cases the Bible and prayer alone are sufficient, but not in every case. Sometimes godly counsel is necessary,” she said. “I believe some medications are a gift from God, and I have seen medication lift a person’s mood just enough for counseling to be effective.” Senior pre-med biology major Kia Torres has seen firsthand the effects of faith on mental illness. Torres has struggled with depression and anxiety since she was diagnosed at the age of 10. Throughout Torres’ middle school and high school years, she struggled with suicide, drugs, partying, and various other vices. In Torres’ freshman year at UMHB, she attended church with her Cru leader. This church service changed her life forever. “The pastor was speaking on Psalms 139, and how you’re made for a purpose. I busted out crying, and I finally decided You’ve proven yourself to me.” Once Torres became a Christian, she underwent counseling where she learned that although someone may be a Christian, they can still have a mental illness. “I realized that depression is something I’m going to struggle with whether I’m a Christian or not,” Torres said. “You can be a strong, solid Christian and still have depression.” In Genesis, the Bible says that what Satan used for evil in Joseph’s story, God used for good to save many people’s lives. Torres has a tattoo...

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Campus discusses concealed carry
Dec08

Campus discusses concealed carry

The university hosted an open forum on Nov. 19 to discuss Senate Bill 11. The Bill states that anyone who has a Concealed Handgun License can open carry on campus. It is mandatory for public universities, however for private universities it is optional. UMHB has the option to completely follow the bill, partially follow it, or disregard it completely. The university currently allows handguns on campus if you have a CHL. However, it must stay in your car. Dr. Steve Theodore, Senior Vice President for Administration & Chief Operating Officer, and Gary Sargent, Chief of Police, held the forum in the Isabelle Rutherford Meyer Nursing Education Center. The rules of the forum? Raise your hand, use the microphone, introduce yourself, and address the panel. “This is not a debate between you and us,” Theodore said. “The administration has no opinion on it right now. Please state your opinion clearly, be brief, and be respectful. We’re all adults here.” The forum started off with freshman social work major, Grace Scott, mentioning the CHL process and what she has observed. “My father is a CHL instructor. [The CHL students] are there to protect themselves and their families,” she said “I don’t think we should put a limitation on this law.” Indy Henderson, a DPT major, took the mic and brought up the topic of police response time. “The average time for the police to arrive at the scene is three to five minutes,” he said. “A lot of people can die in that time”. Dr. Theodore responded to the student’s concerns by explaining the police force evaluation process and the presence level of police on campus. “We always evaluate our police department. We have 24/7 security or police on campus. Now are we going to have a police officer in every building? Probably not. But we do like to evaluate.” Soon after, Colton Hendrick, a junior church music major asked about the current safety regulations regarding tasers and pepper spray. Mediator’s explained that the UMHB Police offer self-defense classes, and mace, stun guns and knives (depending on the size) are allowed on campus. Hope Herring, a mental health graduate student, and a survivor of the Fort Hood mass shooting in 2014, spoke up about her experiences and what she has learned from them. “I’ve been a CH holder for four years and in the military for six years. It is vital for Senate Bill 1 to be at UMHB. I am a survivor from the Fort Hood shooting. The entire incident took 15 minutes. Three were killed, 15 wounded. Out of the 16 people who were military trained, only two had...

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Attacks on Paris leave the world stunned
Dec08

Attacks on Paris leave the world stunned

On Friday, Nov. 13, the City of Light went dark as a series of coordinated terrorist attacks struck Paris, France. The first attack began at 9:20 Central Standard Time, as three men in suicide vests detonated bombs outside of the Stade de France. The next attacks occurred at multiple restaurants, diners, and bars around Paris, killing approximately 40 people. The largest attack that night occurred at 9:40 in the Bataclan Concert Hall. As the Eagles of Death Metal were playing in the 1500-seat hall, attackers barged in and began opening fire on the venue. The assault left 89 people dead and 99 others in critical condition. The final death toll for the attacks was 130 with 367 injured. Out of the 11 attackers responsible for that night, only two remain alive, but authorities have been unable to capture them. These attacks, which have been claimed by the Islamic State (ISIS) militant group, are viewed as an “act of war” by French President Francois Hollande. This has led to a state of emergency throughout France and a tightening of border controls. “The state has increased their security (in universities, schools, subway). Everyone is being more careful but we are all calm,” said Alexandra Basagoitia, a student at the Université Toulouse 1 Capitole. “When an event like this happens, French people stay united.” The horror of the event has drawn support from people across the world. Soon after the news of the attacks hit the United States, social media outlets began trending #prayforParis and filters of the French flag became available on Facebook so that users could change their profile pictures in support of the people of Paris. Facebook even created a “Safety Check” that allowed Parisians to check in with their families to notify them that they were safe. However, along with the overwhelming support for Paris came an overwhelming sense of worry about the safety of other cities and nations. “Like many people, I was shocked and horrified as I read the unfolding story of the Paris attacks. I shared the sense of unease that others had about whether more attacks were forthcoming,” Dr. David Holcomb, a history and political science professor, said. In response to the attacks France has mobilized 115,000 security forces, carried out various raids, and conducted air strikes in Syria in an attempt to target the Islamic State. President Hollande has also called for constitutional amendments that would make responding to terrorist attacks easier. “I believe French society will engage in an ongoing debate (as the US did after 9-11) about the proper balance between liberty and security,” Holcomb said. “Those on the right end...

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Wind ensemble plays life in concert
Nov19

Wind ensemble plays life in concert

Dozens of students, alumni, and relatives gathered to hear a performance by UMHB’s wind ensemble, Nov. 10 in McLane Great Hall. Band Director Nils Landsberg said the theme of the concert was the ups and downs of life, and he chose pieces that symbolized different stages of life from birth to retirement. Each piece represented a moment in life–from the momentous to the somewhat awkward. The band began the concert with with Frank Ticheli’s Joy Revisited (2005). The piece was written to celebrate the birth of the composer’s newborn son. It was a beautiful and celebratory piece that was upbeat and pleasant. The band then played Rollo Takes a Walk (1980) by David Maslanka, which was written about being a child and becoming an adult and the awkwardness of adolescence. The piece was followed by Richard Wagner’s ‘Elsa’s Procession to the Cathedral’ from Lohengrin (1848), which used an operatic style to portray commitment and marriage. The next musical piece was Joel Puckett’s Avelynn’s Lullaby (2011), which was originally written to help the composer’s child get to sleep. There were peaceful moments followed by fast-paced melodies to show the baby fighting the slumber. Then there was an eventual slowing down of the tempo to let the audience know the child was succumbing to sleep. The last piece was another work from David Maslanka called Traveler (2003), which was written to symbolize the retirement of Ray C. Linckenwater. He was a professor whose band students composed the piece in honor of his retirement. “My favorite part about being in the wind ensemble is that you get challenged on more than just an academic level,” said freshman marketing major, Sara Garcia, who plays the french horn in the ensemble. Although she enjoyed playing all of the pieces, one song stuck out to her. “I think [Traveler] is the coolest song ever. Every different instrument has a highlight moment. It’s really busy it’s really fun and I think it’s a great piece.” Senior nursing major Kristina Borhne described the performance as a memorable showcase of an ensemble with a lot of talent. “The beginning and the end were excellent. They always go out with a bang,” Borhne said. Band alumni Kacie Jumper also attended the concert and enjoyed hearing those who followed in her footsteps. “I love being able to come back and see how the band has grown from when I was here,” Jumper said. “It makes me proud to come from...

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Homecoming week full of Cru traditions
Nov19

Homecoming week full of Cru traditions

ssert party, lemur kissing and a Crusader win. The 2015 University of Mary Hardin-Baylor homecoming week that took place Sunday. Nov. 8 through Saturday, Nov. 14, had a little something for everyone to enjoy. “Homecoming’s been fun. I was on the action committee which was interesting to be a part of. It was fun to help out with everything they needed. Set up, tear down; I was just there,” freshman nursing major Sammy Pilkington said. Throughout the week, the student organizations team gave away tanks and gift cards at various locations on campus. Some students even had to sing or answer questions to receive their prize. Students also participated in a weeklong event called The Hunt. Participants were asked to take pictures at various locations on and off campus to compete for the golden ticket. Winners of the golden ticket sat in a special balcony in Bawcom Student Union for the Cru’s game against East Texas Baptist University on Saturday. Shelby Halloran and Ryan Tyler-Coronado won the special prize. Another event, Clash of Classes, took place at the Recreation Courts on Tuesday at 9 p.m., where members from each class went head-to-head in a dodge ball competition. The sophomores took the victory. Students also took advantage of Relax and Unwind that took place on Thursday at 9 p.m. The university brought in food trucks for the first time, and Cue the Sun Band and Adam Fischer + Hunter Rea Band performed. Hot chocolate and s’mores were also available during the event. While students enjoyed refreshments, UMHB ATPE had university chaplain Dr. Loutherback kiss a lemur for Project Apple Tree. During the week, students voted with $1 tickets to choose which staff member would kiss the creature. Students could choose from Vice-President of Student Life, Dr. Byron Weathersbee, BSM Director, Dr. Shawn Shannon, or Director of Spititual Life, Dr. George Loutherback. Project Apple Tree raises money to buy school supplies for children in the Belton area. The lucky winner, was forced to put barbecue sauce on his lips before Mozzy, the lemur, kissed him. “It was unlike anything I’ve ever experienced,” Loutherback said. “The lemur was very aggressive, but it was fun. I’ve never done it before, so this is a first for me.” Stunt Night was also part of the homecoming festivites and took place on Thursday and Friday night at 7 p.m. Each class performed a ten minute skit based on the theme, vintage video games, which was chosen by the sophomore class. The freshman, who chose Pong as their game, told the story of a freshman girl, Claire, struggling between staying at UMHB or transferring to another...

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Class prepares students for missions
Nov19

Class prepares students for missions

The Bible says that it is the responsibility of the believers to deliver the Gospel to everybody. But language barriers can sometimes get in the way of witnessing to others. Spanish for Mission Work (SPAP 1340) is a class designed to close the gap between UMHB students and potential Spanish-speaking believers in Christ. “It is our hope that Spanish for Mission Work will link up with missionary programs,” said Gary Smith, Spanish for Mission Work Instructor. The course is designed for those who are interested in missions and also have the desire to learn more about the language and the culture of the Spanish-speaking world. The course will count as an elective credit and will possibly be available in the spring 2016 semester pending administration data results. Basic knowledge of Spanish is recommended, but it will not be required to take the course. The emphasis of the course will be learning various Biblical terms in Spanish, as well as how to deliver the Gospel to a Spanish speaker. The course is new, and those involved are very excited about the possibility of equipping more Spanish-speaking students for the mission field. “The author of the textbook works at Dallas University, and she is very excited to be part of what we are trying to do,” Smith said. UMHB has several mission-centered classes, and Smith is hopeful that the new course will add another successful missionary program to the university’s repertoire. Smith said if students want more information about the course and want to find out how to sign up, they should contact him at gary.smith@umhb.edu, or talk to any of the the other foreign language...

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