Presidential candidate profiles: Barack Obama
Oct21

Presidential candidate profiles: Barack Obama

Barack Obama Democrat Age: 47 years old Education: Law, Harvard University Occupation: Illinois Senator Religion: United Church of Christ Interesting Fact: The first African-American president of the Harvard Law Review. Economic Policy -Would provide $50 billion to jumpstart the economy, provide more jobs -Would give middle class tax relief Health Care -Would create a new national health care plan for those who cannot afford coverage. -Supports greater regulation of the private health insurance industry. War in Iraq -Plans a phased withdrawal of U.S. troops engaged in combat operations. -Will keep pressure on Iraq, focusing on training Iraqi security forces. Energy -Acquire energy independence with renewable fuels and clean coal. -Build more hybrids and promote ethanol use. -Implement a national program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Same-sex Marriage -Believes marriage is between a man and woman. -Supports civil unions for same-sex couples Education -Strongly supports pay increases for teachers. -Reform and fund the No Child Left Behind -Will create a new American Opportunity Tax Credit to provide free or low-cost public education for those eligible. Immigration Policy -Wants to extend welfare, Medicaid and Social Security to immigrants. -Voted no on declaring English as the official language of the U.S. -Voted to build border fence and establish guest worker program. -Would allow  undocumented immigrants in good standing to pay a fine and learn English in order to become a U.S. citizen. Abortion -Pro-choice, supports Roe v Wade. -Opposes notifying parents of minors who seek out-of-state abortions. -Would provide $100 million to reduce teen pregnancy through education and...

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Presidential candidate profiles: John McCain
Oct21

Presidential candidate profiles: John McCain

John McCain Republican Age: 72 years old Education: U.S. Naval Academy Occupation: Arizona Senator  Religion: Episcopalian Interesting Fact: As a third generation naval aviator, he was shot down over Vietnam in 1967 and held as a prisoner of war for more than five years. Economic Policy -Plans to keep taxes low and restrain federal spending. -Create good jobs by promoting new markets in the United States Health Care -Plans to provide tax credits for families and individuals to buy health insurance. -Would promote healthy lifestyles to reduce the need for medical care. War in Iraq -Opposes withdrawal until Iraq is stable. Energy -Supports increased oil drilling,  nuclear energy, and alternative fuels -Would work to decrease dependence on foreign oil. Same-sex Marriage -Would let states decide on issues of same-sex marriage. Education -Would provide school vouchers for private education. -Opposes implementing federal testing standards. -Supports increasing teacher salaries. -Supports freedom to choose schools Immigration Policy -Advocates tightening border security. -Supports allowing additional legal immigrants through expanded visa programs. -Electronic employment verification system to screen employees quickly. Abortion -Pro-life, believes Roe v. Wade should be overturned. -Would promote child adoptions. -Opposes creation of human embryos for research...

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Presidential election: Polls and platforms
Oct21

Presidential election: Polls and platforms

A poll was conducted that surveyed 670 students and 148 faculty and staff, asking whom they would choose for the 2008 presidency and which foreign and domestic issues are most important to them. Below are the results of the questionnaire. Quick facts about the candidates and proposed solutions to dominate political issues are also provided. Obama or McCain? As the presidential race approaches the finish line, many wonder who will be the 44th president of the United States of America. According to a poll taken on the UMHB campus if the elections were held today students, faculty and staff would vote: Issues The following graph shows the recent poll’s results for the most relevant issues regarding the election. The poll compares faculty and staff’s top choices to those marked most by...

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Professors study how students are spending time

Two faculty members are conducting a survey to find out how UMHB students spend their time. The study began Oct. 19 and will end Nov. 2. It was created and is being supervised by Dr. Doyle Eiler, associate professor of marketing, and Dr. Paul Stock, assistant professor and chairperson of accounting, economics and finance. The survey asks students to record their time consumption by recalling how they spent their time in 30-minute intervals throughout a 24-hour period, beginning at 4 a.m. “After doing some research about when to end the day, we found that most students are done for the day by 4 in the morning,” Eiler said. “For some groups of people midnight would be a good time to end the day. However, for students we thought 4 would be better. With our original test groups, we also found that recalling what you did throughout the day in 30-minute intervals works much better than 15-minute periods or hour intervals.” Eiler and Stock have developed a list of 13 categories for students to choose from when recording their time usage. Some include sleeping, eating, personal care, class time, study time, work, activities and athletics. “I worked in industry and had never been at a university this small, and when I came here I had some expectations,” Eiler said. “I was surprised when students were in class taking and telling me about how much time they said they were working or that a number of students were taking courses at other universities at the same time they were going here. I was also very surprised by the magnitude of time that seemed to be consumed by athletics.” “So my question was ‘What are students doing with their time?’ If you are going to address the problem of students sleeping in class, are they just being foolish, or are they working a full-time job too? If a student skips class, is it because they are goofing off, or are they in the gym training or at a meeting for an organization or taking care of their children?” The U.S. Department of Labor did a similar survey on how students spend their time nationwide conducted from 2003 to 2005. The study concluded that students on average spend 8.5 hours sleeping, 4.1 hours in leisure and sports activities and 2.7 hours working. The survey here will not only focus on how typical undergraduate students spend their time but will also update the conclusions found nearly four years ago. “The Department of Labor used a diary method for their survey, but we thought that that method would be more tedious and less conclusive than...

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Many gather for popular game shows
Oct21

Many gather for popular game shows

Every year students gather from all over campus. Oct. 17 is the official day for the 8th annual RA Events. Senior psychology major Ryan Hutsell is program’s co-chairman. “The program is for students to get involved on campus and to relax and have fun,”  she said. The day included six events. Hutsell said she and the chairman, senior public relations major Katelyn Dean, spent countless hours planning, making phone calls, sending e-mails and attending meetings. “It was stressful, but the RAs have built a strong group,” she said. “It also creates a bonding tradition between the freshmen and RAs. We’re not just here to constantly check in students and give fines. We’re here to have fun with them, too.” Hutsell said anyone who is an RA with freshmen on their floor can participate in the games, which were inspired by television shows. Freshman sports management major Doug Peak was having a good time with the guessing game of Will it Float? “We had to guess if chalk would float,” he said. “I thought that it would, but it sank. It was a tough defeat, but the important thing is that we all had fun.” Freshman biology major Andrew Christian also participated in the event. “I guessed that a 10-year-old computer would sink, and I guessed right,” he said. “I picked my prize, Jujifruit candy.” Faculty were also invited to participate. In the Are you smarter than a freshman? category, Vice President of Student Affairs Dr. Steve Theodore challenged freshmen in the battle of the brains. “I’m looking forward to having some fun,” he said with a laugh. “It‘s been a long time since I was a Freshman.” Dr. Steve Oldham, provost and vice president for Academic Affairs, was also a contestant in the knowledge challenge. “I enjoy getting involved with the students and having a good time with them,” he said. “It’s important to involve faculty because we’re part of the student environment. (It) was a good opportunity to bond with the students.” After 11 years of being a resident director, Cathy Durham has been a part of many campus events. She believed the evening was a success. “We have some exciting freshmen this year,” she said. “Ryan is very organized, and she did an awesome job.” The smell of food did not go unnoticed during the Top Chef College Style, competition. Junior history major Teaven Barnum was a judge in the cook-off. “The point is to have fun as a freshman and for them to know that UMHB appreciates them,” he said. “There are three rounds of competition, pasta, soup and sandwiches.” The freshmen cooked using their college...

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Professor’s art inspires, raises money for organization
Oct21

Professor’s art inspires, raises money for organization

No one would have guessed the boy playing in the mud during recess would go to grad school, become an art professor and sell some of his ceramic creations for upwards of $65 each. “Mud and boys go together,” Professor of art Dr. Philip Dunham, said. “(I) immediately fell in love with mud.” Dunham has been at the university for the past 22 years. He teaches ceramics I and II, 3D design and sculpture. “There is a parallel perception in my teaching to address a number of problems that focus on formal and psychological issues while stimulating the students to consider and clarify tactics of learning on their own.” During the past 10 years, Dunham has been working to perfect a method for creating unique ceramic crosses. Each cross has intricate swirls or flowers. Once the clay has been formed and becomes “bone dry,” it undergoes the firing process that turns the clay into stone. Dunham said, “When you fire, if you don’t use your technique properly, things can go wrong.” Five pieces Dunham donated were auctioned during family weekend. The $245 raised went to the Crusader Parent Organization, which purchases items such as the big screen TVs in the Mabee Student Center for the use of students. Administrative assistant of Student Affairs Joy Childress said, “To me, (the crosses) make me think of how God is with us. We’re all cracked clay in His hands, and He can take something that is cracked and make something unique and beautiful out of it.” The most common problems in the process are when air bubbles are captured within the clay, or when the clay is too thick or too wet when it is fired. “It will explode … and you will lose your pieces,” Dunham said. When he began making ceramic crosses, he was trying to better his own skills. Because the firing process is particularly risky, he had to learn to take chances. “The technique I had to study on several different types of approaches … in order to see what my percentage of danger would be in firing.” Students in Dunham’s ceramics class agree that the technique takes time to develop. Senior psychology major Meghan Bray said, “So far, my favorite piece to do is the cross. It’s so hard, but it still looks kind of cool … when it’s not sitting next to Dr. Dunham’s.” Sometimes molding the clay takes patience. “It’s very frustrating when you have an image in your head, and you can’t make your clay look like that image,” Bray said. “I imagine that it’s very frustrating when your sculptures blow up in the...

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