A Crusader Christmas

...

Read More

Season offers several service opportunities

Verses like, “We wish you a merry Christmas and a happy New Year,” ring out among people during the holidays, but what if instead of simply wishing another would have a good time, people would make sure needs were met? As winter approaches, students have the opportunity to serve and share what they have with others through many different venues. A group of 30 students and eight adults will head to southeast Texas for another Hurricane Ike relief effort, Jan. 1-7. The trip, offered through the Baptist Student Ministry, is partnering with Nehemiah’s Division and locals for the reconstruction of the area. “Last time we did ‘mudout,’ where we actually tear things out, and now we are going to put things back in the house,” said Tommy Wilson, one of the student leaders for the trip. The team hopes to rebuild not only destroyed property but the hearts of those mourning their losses. Wilson said the mission trip will benefit the victims of Hurricane Ike by meeting needs and by investing in their lives. “We are kind of hoping to come back to the same contacts we had last time to show them we are not just a one show kind of thing — that we are in it for the long haul, and ultimately that is how Christ is,” he said. “He doesn’t just save us and throw us to the four winds and says, ‘Figure it out. You’re in a relationship with me,’ he says, ‘I want to walk beside you to the completion.’” In addition to affected residents, Wilson hopes the trip will aid in shaping missional lifestyles for participates. “I want them to see service is much more than being a preacher or necessarily going on a mission trip where you go around evangelizing one on one. The biggest way we can do missions is to evangelize with our lifestyles and with the gifts and talents God has given us,” he said. Although some have missed the ability to attend this trip, Wilson hopes they will understand missions are more than one time and one place. He said, “Doing missions is not something you do. It is a lifestyle you live. I hope people understand that whether they are working on someone’s house wherever, they have the opportunity to live missional.” As the team prepares to load up, another chance to participate in the Hurricane Ike relief is available. Cleanup efforts will be made in Galveston during spring break. Wilson said to contact the BSM for more information. If people still want to help, supplies for the trip are needed and can be left at...

Read More
Search CRU hosts events for prospective students
Dec09

Search CRU hosts events for prospective students

The high school student arrives, and his mother parks the car. He timidly steps outside of the car and onto the pavement. As he proceeds toward the campus, he walks past the large stone letters and is greeted by college students in purple and white polos. Search CRU, an organization  started in 2007 by the admissions and recruiting office. It was designed for  for the purpose of welcoming prospective students to campus. Admissions counselor Elizabeth Webb is one of the advisers for the foundation. She was involved with the planning process before the organization was created and thinks it has been an advantage for all parties participating. “We started it as a way to get current students involved with meeting prospective students,” she said. “We have a lot of current students who love UMHB and wanted to show and talk with students and tell them why. So it seemed like a good fit to get them more involved with the prospects and a benefit for both of them.” Some of the prospective students complete evaluations, and the recruiting office has received positive remarks about their experiences. “We had students say ‘I enjoyed meeting current students. I really enjoyed hanging out with them.’ That seems good because they do enjoy having that interaction,” Webb said. Currently, 30 members serve the campus in Search Cru, but it’s not too late for others to join. Junior marketing major and the organization’s president Jennifer Walker said, “We have interviews every semester. You only have to be committed for a semester, or you can stay committed to Search CRU ‘till you graduate. It is up to you.” Walker wanted to join because of her passion for the university, and she hopes more people will jump aboard. “I joined Search CRU because I love UMHB, and I always try to get other students to come here. I love to tell them everything that UMHB has to offer. If you are like this and love to tell people about UMHB, then you should try out for this group.” Several events are planned through the admissions and recruiting office and put on by Search CRU. One is Preview Weekend, a time when prospective students spend two days at UMHB. They are also partnered with current students, allowing them to gain the full picture of what is offered by the university. Walker said Preview Weekend took a whole semester to organize. “Actually it gets planned all year long for the recruiters. Preview is the recruiter’s main recruiting event, so there is a lot going on.” On Nov. 21 and 22 about 300 prospective students arrived to get a...

Read More

Students strike gold with ‘Texas Louvre’ art site

While many students ask themselves if anything they do in class will be useful in real life, that is not an issue for senior marketing majors Tanner Vaughan, Gilbert Mendoza and Eric Roberson. They have a successful art auctioning Web site and nearly $750 in sales to prove it. The three students began a business venture in October called the “3-20 Challenge” as part of the Introduction to Entrepreneurship class taught by Assistant Prof-essor and chair of the Management and Marketing departments, Dr. Barbara Dalby. “Rather than just the typical things you do in a course, I wanted them to get the flavor of being an entrepreneur,” Dalby said. During the challenge, each team of three students was loaned $20 as an original investment and given three weeks to turn a profit. Not only did the original loan have to be repaid, but also $2 a week in “rent.” Of any profits, 20 percent would go to “taxes” and 10 percent back to the “investor” as dividends. Vaughan developed the idea for an art auctioning Web site, inspired by his mother. “My mom is an oil painter, so the original idea was to commission a painting from her, sell it online and give her a portion of the profits,” Vaughan said. “Then I realized that this is a lot like what an art gallery does, only they take paintings that are already finished, sell them for the artist and take a portion of the profits. My thought was that I could do the exact same thing, only do it online.” The students created their Web site using a free service and named the site The Texas Louvre. They began by auctioning art from Vaughan’s mother and several of her friends who were also artists. “She and a couple of her friends had several paintings lying around that they hadn’t been able to sell at their shows,” Roberson said. “They gave these unsold paintings to us to sell for them.” The students auction most of the art through eBay, although several paintings sold quickly from the site itself. The Texas Louvre features art from Austin artist Robin Cheers, California artist Tom Brown and “V” Vaughn, Tanner Vaughn’s mother. The site includes an art gallery of paintings that can be immediately purchased, links to current eBay auctions and information about the artists and the site itself. The students keep 20 percent of total sales, with half going directly to the artists and the other 30 percent to the class in the form of “taxes” and “dividends” to the “investor.” This has not come without challenges, as the young entrepreneurs have sometimes...

Read More
Wonderful world offers internships
Dec09

Wonderful world offers internships

A number of different majors on campus require students to do an internship before they can graduate. It has to be a sufficient number of hours, and it has to relate to their major in some way. Although the university does all it can to find students appropriate intern positions, sometimes the task can be frustrating. However, one Fortune 500 company comes to campus every semester to recruit students of all majors for a life-enhancing experience. Each fall and spring, a recruiter comes to UMHB and does a presentation about the world of Disney and all it has to offer. At the conclusion, a potential hire is given the opportunity to fill out an application and is interviewed on the spot. About three weeks later, applicants receive letters explaining if they’ve been selected or not. If chosen to be a cast member, students fly or drive to Orlando, Fla., where a fully furnished apartment is waiting for them. Students have the choice to live with one or five roommates, who could come from anywhere around the world. After arriving on the Disney property, interns take a class called Traditions where the cast members are given the history of the company. Afterwards, they are plugged into a variety of jobs including entertainment, merchandise, lifeguard, park operations, quick-service food, culinary and others. Additionally, they may take courses for college credit at Disney University. Professor of communication and media studies Dr. Diane Howard, along with a couple of on-campus Disney representatives, are the contacts for the recruiter. They help to get the word out to the students about presentations by putting up posters and chalking the sidewalk. “I think it is an excellent program for a proactive student who will take advantage of the many opportunities that it offers,” Howard said. “It provides opportunities for ongoing career training in communication, science, marketing, entertainment, hospitality, guest services and more.” Will Johnson, a UMHB alum, went through two internships with Disney. He worked in the entertainment department and is now a full- time cast member. “I started on the program back in 2006 doing the spring advantage program. As of now, I am trained in most of the shows and parades at Hollywood Studios including Block Party, and High School Musical 3,” he said. Johnson is also involved with the Season Christmas show that is performed on stage in front of Cinderella’s castle. He considers it a great honor. Recently, junior computer graphics design major Holly Gaskamp was selected to be a part of the college program in the spring. She first heard about the opportunity as a freshmen and has now decided to...

Read More
Festival to welcome poet laureates
Dec09

Festival to welcome poet laureates

The university’s English department will host its annual Writer’s Festival over the Christmas break. The event is scheduled for Jan. 7-10 and is open to students, faculty, staff and the community. This year’s schedule features a variety of events, which will take place in Brindley Auditorium, with a coffee house and an open mic night on Wednesday evening. The festival will include  numerous writers like Alan Berecka, Brady Peterson, and Jeanne Murray Walker, who will speak on different topics. Walker is an award-winning poet, with a diverse number of plays under her belt. For 20 years, she worked as an editor of poetry for Christianity and Literature. She now works for both Shenandoah and Image on the editorial boards. Walker will lead a master poetry workshop during the festival and give the George Nixon Memorial Lecture on Thursday in Brindley Auditorium. Additionally, key speakers will include Texas Poet Laureate, Larry Thomas, and past Texas Poet Laureate, Cleatus Rattan. Thomas has been writing poetry since the ’70s and had his first book published in 2000. He has completed six more since then. Rattan was the poet laureate during 2004 and is a professor of English at UMHB. Still on the Hill, made up of Donna Stjerna and Kelly Mulhollan, will be returning to coach their workshop. Last year, they offered an afternoon workshop and played an evening performance entitled Gathering Paradise, sponsored by the Honors Program. This time around, Still on the Hill will be taking phrases and lines of poetry from those who attend, and will transform them into songs. The duo will also perform a full concert Friday evening after dinner. Art Professor Helen Kwiatkowski will teach an art workshop. Held in the Mabee Student Center, her workshop will train participants how to use visual elements to tell stories. Using a style known as visual narrative, she welcomes anyone, whether or not they have had experience in the field. Kwiatkowski hopes that the festival will instruct readers to think outside the box and break the boundaries of their imagination. The cost to register for the entire festival is $100. This includes all readings, workshops, refreshments and dinner. To come for just one day, the cost is $40, and individual events are $20. The event is free for UMHB students. Some scholarships are available. More information about the festival is available from Dr. Audell Shelburne at ext. 4561 or contact him at...

Read More
Page 209 of 220« First...102030...207208209210211...220...Last »