Charter day ushers in year 164
Feb10

Charter day ushers in year 164

The University of Mary-Hardin Baylor celebrated its anniversary by placing a wreath on judge R.E.B. Baylor’s grave 164 years after the charter was signed. The gift was given in honor of the founder’s accomplishments. The Campus Activities Board hosted a birthday party in the SUB to celebrate, offering balloon animals and cake to students who decided to join the merriment. The charter provided groundwork for two prominent Texas universities: UMHB and Baylor. Junior elementary education major Melody Haynes takes pride in the university’s colorful past. “UMHB’s rich history means that I am a part of something bigger than me,” she said, “It makes me proud to go to a school that has stood the test of time and come out stronger.” Haynes also feels the departure of President Dr. Jerry Bawcom will be noticeable in the history of the school. She said, “Dr. Bawcom has done so much for this university. After 19 years of service, I think everyone will miss him.” Sophomore biology and athletic training double major Sherissa Hua also noted that Bawcom has been a large influence at UMHB. “He will be greatly missed because he has been a great supporter of our school,” she said, “He constantly cheers for our sporting events and is a great leader. He has taken part in defining our school as a whole just by being there and helping to make changes in even the littlest of aspects.” Hua said that Charter Day is an important celebration because “that was the day our school was born. We would not be here without it.” Sophomore history major Ryan Boyd thinks that one of UMHB’s greatest achievements was the integration of males to the school in 1971. He said, “The fact that I am able to be a part of this prestigious school gives me a sense of pride. I am glad that males are actually able to come here now because we get to experience privileges that we may have not otherwise been able to experience in the past here.” Boyd also added that “UMHB sports would not be what it is today without the integration of men to the school.” The university has a rich history which started 164 years ago, leading to the school’s move to Belton in 1886, followed by the establishment of the first work-study program for women and several name changes. Some notable achievements include establishing the first school of journalism for a women’s college and being recognized as the first Texas Baptist school. The Charter Day chapel featured guest speaker Dwight Edwards, class of 1980. Edwards challenged students not to just exist, but to live....

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Exercise, proper diet, enough sleep lead to better mental and physical health

Living a mentally and physically healthy lifestyle is crucial. Director of Counseling Nate Williams thinks that basic self care can go a long way. “A lot of what I see with students is that they are emotionally depleted as well as being physically sick,” he said. “Watching nutrition and increasing exercise can significantly help mental health. It applies to stress, anxiety, depression and other conditions.” Exam and final weeks, students should make sure that they are getting enough physical activity. “During periods of testing, being consistent with exercise can ease the mind,”  Williams said. “It has a good effect on tension, sleep and mood.” According to the American College Health Association, individuals should not exercise right before going to bed. Morning and late afternoon are the best times. “Do a form of exercise that you like,” Williams said. “Doing something that you hate, will not relieve as much stress. If you don’t like working out in the gym, try ultimate Frisbee or another relaxing outdoor sport. Students can also get involved with intramurals.” Caring for your spiritual life can uplift mental health. “Studies show that the spiritual element is very important,” Williams said. “Being connected with a church brings comfort.” Students need to find a friend that they can express their thoughts to without judgment. “If you don’t talk, your body will,” Williams said.  “Unresolved problems not talked about and processed will increase stress and inner conflict, often leading to physical complaints or illness.” Mental health needs to have a balance with good physical health as well. Coordinator of Health Services Debbie Rosenberger, RN encourages students to be cautious of their eating habits. “A variety of fruits and veggies is needed,” she said. “They may be more expensive but it’s worth the nutrition that you are getting from them. Also, a general multivitamin is a good idea for college students, since most do not eat an adequate diet.” Watching soda intake is also vital to college students.  Not to mention, that the dark soda drinks contain phosphates that negate calcium intake.  Therefore, some may develop weak (or) porous bones [osteoporosis] in later life. “One Coke a day over a year can add 10 pounds in weight,” Rosenberger said. “Supper should also be the lightest meal and breakfast should be the greatest. Your body is ‘breaking the fast’ after sleeping, that’s why it’s called breakfast.” Individuals need to also be aware of the amount of sleep that their body is receiving. “A body that is sleep deprived over a long period of times displays the same symptoms of a body under the influence of alcohol,” she said. “Students need to...

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Ministry’s journey sparks progress
Feb10

Ministry’s journey sparks progress

Historical leaders cast vision, building on the directors of their past and making their own revelation for the future. The student-led organization, Focus, sponsored by the Baptist Student Ministry, has been built on by many, and new leaders leave their marks behind. Focus meets every Wednesday at 8:28 p.m. in Manning Chapel. Since August, the ministry has concentrated on a new yearning for the campus. Sophomore theology and philosophy major Joe Giles is the current student coordinator and has been a part of the ministry since his freshman year. “I got involved with Focus very quickly. In the first two weeks, I was just doing slides, and then, not even halfway through the semester, I was going to the planning meetings.” Giles has been able to see a change in Focus within the last year— a new thirst for God. “There has been much more emphasis on prayer, but beyond that, I think the big change is with the hearts of the students coming,” he said. In the past, students mainly gathered to socialize, but now Giles said their reason for attending has changed the overall feel of worship. “It’s a different atmosphere than last year. This year there is a hunger, such a hunger that people are meeting before hand to pray,” he said. The idea of worship has taken a new shape. “(It) is not a building, speaker or band. Worship is coming fully and submitting yourself fully to God and what God has in store for you,” Giles said. When Focus first started this year, Giles had a vision. “My hope and goal is that people come even hungrier, that it doesn’t stop at Focus, that they don’t think worship is once a week, but they bring worship into their daily lives. And they take their worship experience that they have at Focus, and . . . dive deeper into their own churches.” His prayer is that every Wednesday night, the Focus team and the speakers are able to provide a place of worship and time to focus on one thing: allowing the passions of the students to expand. “I don’t want it to stay confined in Manning Chapel. I want it to spark hearts and lives to be able to do what God has called them to do here on this campus and further,” Giles said. Shawn Shannon, the Baptist Student Ministry director, has been a part the Focus ministry and has also seen changes. “I have seen an increasing student fingerprints on it that students own it,” she said. She has observed not only a boost in attendance, but also more variety. “The Focus crowd...

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The voice behind the phone: serving the Cru with every call

Many people talk to her. Few know her name. Debbie Bennett, the university’s administrative receptionist, directs countless calls each day. Responsible for the school’s main phone line, Bennett’s entire attention is on helping others. “I get to meet a lot of great people,” she said. “It’s an interesting job.” Bennett approaches her duties, which include answering phones, directing callers and assisting human resources and the admissions offices, as the chance to humbly serve others. “A student will come in crying because something didn’t go right,” Bennett said. “They’re lost and don’t have a clue. There are also those first-time parents who are sending their children off to college. I can relate.” She tries to meet the various needs that come through the Sanderford office doors, which is one of the lessons her mother taught her. Bennett dwelled on the concept “always help people.” She said her mother, who is 78 and lives in Monahans, Texas, set the perfect example. “She is very active and goes to church every time the door opens,” Bennett said of her mom. “She takes anywhere from two to three women to go with her who are normally not able to go. She’s the best mom.” Bennett has modeled herself after her mother’s attitude, according to her daughter, Lori Tupin. “My mother has always had the kindest heart, and she always put us before herself,” Tupin said. “Our needs were always met, and we are better people because of my mother’s generosity and loving heart.” Bennett’s past jobs have all been about assisting people. “(She) is the most selfless person that I know and she has a heart of gold,” Tupin said. “Any act of kindness that she gives is out of good faith, and she never expects anything in return.” Though born in Rockdale, Calif., Bennett was raised in Andrews, Texas. Her father was in the Marines. She then moved to Odessa, Texas, where she went to Odessa College and took a nine-month secretarial business class. In that same city she met and married David Bennett, her husband of 27 years, who is employed by the Texas Depart-ment of Transportation in Austin. David’s job has taken the family to various Texas cities, which have all brought a variety of adventures, including different jobs for Debbie. “Every time we’ve moved, it has been a better position for him,” Debbie said of her husband. Bennett has always been willing to make the adjustments, but it hasn’t been easy. “I’ve been very lucky to get good jobs, but it has been hard,” she said. “It’s difficult going to a town where you don’t know anybody and nobody...

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Zumba classes add spice, lively music to workouts
Feb10

Zumba classes add spice, lively music to workouts

By Lindsay Schaefer Dr. Jim King, dean of the College of Business, is one of the few males who attends the new Zumba classes, but that has not stopped him from learning how to shake his hips. He admits that it’s intimidating being one of the only males; however he enjoys giving Sue Weaver, the instructor, a hard time when she refers to the group as “girls.” Although King is surrounded by females, he is not embarrassed during the class because there is no time to be concerned if the other class participants are watching. “I can’t worry about what other people think,” he said. “I’m not coordinated enough. I am so focused on (Weaver), the mirror and myself that I just think about doing my best and getting it over with.” Weaver, director of Campus Recreation, said she brought zumba to the university because she is “always looking for new and innovative classes and (UMHB) really needed another cardiovascular type of class that people would like and would be interested in.” Zumba, Spanish slang for “to move fast and have fun,” is a Latin-inspired dance workout that blends salsa, meringue, cumbia and samba moves with classical aerobic steps to tone muscles and strengthen the cardiovascular system. Founded in Latin America by Beto Perez in the 1990s, Zumba was brought to the United States in 1999 and has grown into the most popular dance fitness class to sweep the U.S and abroad. The class is a high energy, fast-paced, full body exercise that makes it easy to forget that it’s a real exercise. Zumba’s catch phrase, “Ditch the party, join the workout,” is centered on the idea that exercising should be exciting and easy to do. Weaver said, “Mainly it’s just fun, and people don’t feel like they’re working out all that much, but in reality they are burning between 500 and 1,000 calories.” The class appeals to people who are looking for a new type of fitness regimen or to those who want to enjoy exercising with friends. King started attending the Zumba class because he was looking for a group exercise to add to his usual workout routine, so he took a chance by attending the first class. He has stuck with it and recommends it. “It’s a great activity for exercise, and it’s a lot of fun,” he said. Prior dance or athleticism abilities are not required to enjoy a zumba class; however, a positive attitude and a willingness to try are the keys to successfully completing a class. If you are considering taking the Zumba class, King offers words of wisdom. “You have to accept...

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Filling  Tatenda’s Shoes
Feb10

Filling Tatenda’s Shoes

“Good. Better. Best. Never let it rest, until the good is better and the better best.” -Tatenda Tavaziva Student Body President Garret Smith Junior mass communication/public relations major Q- How do you define good leadership? A- I think good leadership is for one thing, having not just a knowledge of how to lead, but two, taking the initiative of actually doing that, and once you start the course not letting up. Tommy Wilson Junior marketing major Q-What do you hope to do if elected? A-One of the main things I hope to do if elected here at Mary Hardin-Baylor is to continue helping build community. I know that’s a constant goal we’re working on, and we’re continuously trying to work on that, but the more that we press toward that and we really have that on our hearts and have that as our focus, I think we can achieve it. Kimberly Jones Junior history major Q- What experience or qualifications can you bring to the position? A- I was student body president in high school. I was freshman class chaplain, and I served two years on the executive cabinet. I am now internal vice president …. I have the leadership and administration gifts that I am ready and just excited to be using more on this...

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