Professors study how students are spending time

Two faculty members are conducting a survey to find out how UMHB students spend their time. The study began Oct. 19 and will end Nov. 2. It was created and is being supervised by Dr. Doyle Eiler, associate professor of marketing, and Dr. Paul Stock, assistant professor and chairperson of accounting, economics and finance. The survey asks students to record their time consumption by recalling how they spent their time in 30-minute intervals throughout a 24-hour period, beginning at 4 a.m. “After doing some research about when to end the day, we found that most students are done for the day by 4 in the morning,” Eiler said. “For some groups of people midnight would be a good time to end the day. However, for students we thought 4 would be better. With our original test groups, we also found that recalling what you did throughout the day in 30-minute intervals works much better than 15-minute periods or hour intervals.” Eiler and Stock have developed a list of 13 categories for students to choose from when recording their time usage. Some include sleeping, eating, personal care, class time, study time, work, activities and athletics. “I worked in industry and had never been at a university this small, and when I came here I had some expectations,” Eiler said. “I was surprised when students were in class taking and telling me about how much time they said they were working or that a number of students were taking courses at other universities at the same time they were going here. I was also very surprised by the magnitude of time that seemed to be consumed by athletics.” “So my question was ‘What are students doing with their time?’ If you are going to address the problem of students sleeping in class, are they just being foolish, or are they working a full-time job too? If a student skips class, is it because they are goofing off, or are they in the gym training or at a meeting for an organization or taking care of their children?” The U.S. Department of Labor did a similar survey on how students spend their time nationwide conducted from 2003 to 2005. The study concluded that students on average spend 8.5 hours sleeping, 4.1 hours in leisure and sports activities and 2.7 hours working. The survey here will not only focus on how typical undergraduate students spend their time but will also update the conclusions found nearly four years ago. “The Department of Labor used a diary method for their survey, but we thought that that method would be more tedious and less conclusive than...

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Many gather for popular game shows
Oct21

Many gather for popular game shows

Every year students gather from all over campus. Oct. 17 is the official day for the 8th annual RA Events. Senior psychology major Ryan Hutsell is program’s co-chairman. “The program is for students to get involved on campus and to relax and have fun,”  she said. The day included six events. Hutsell said she and the chairman, senior public relations major Katelyn Dean, spent countless hours planning, making phone calls, sending e-mails and attending meetings. “It was stressful, but the RAs have built a strong group,” she said. “It also creates a bonding tradition between the freshmen and RAs. We’re not just here to constantly check in students and give fines. We’re here to have fun with them, too.” Hutsell said anyone who is an RA with freshmen on their floor can participate in the games, which were inspired by television shows. Freshman sports management major Doug Peak was having a good time with the guessing game of Will it Float? “We had to guess if chalk would float,” he said. “I thought that it would, but it sank. It was a tough defeat, but the important thing is that we all had fun.” Freshman biology major Andrew Christian also participated in the event. “I guessed that a 10-year-old computer would sink, and I guessed right,” he said. “I picked my prize, Jujifruit candy.” Faculty were also invited to participate. In the Are you smarter than a freshman? category, Vice President of Student Affairs Dr. Steve Theodore challenged freshmen in the battle of the brains. “I’m looking forward to having some fun,” he said with a laugh. “It‘s been a long time since I was a Freshman.” Dr. Steve Oldham, provost and vice president for Academic Affairs, was also a contestant in the knowledge challenge. “I enjoy getting involved with the students and having a good time with them,” he said. “It’s important to involve faculty because we’re part of the student environment. (It) was a good opportunity to bond with the students.” After 11 years of being a resident director, Cathy Durham has been a part of many campus events. She believed the evening was a success. “We have some exciting freshmen this year,” she said. “Ryan is very organized, and she did an awesome job.” The smell of food did not go unnoticed during the Top Chef College Style, competition. Junior history major Teaven Barnum was a judge in the cook-off. “The point is to have fun as a freshman and for them to know that UMHB appreciates them,” he said. “There are three rounds of competition, pasta, soup and sandwiches.” The freshmen cooked using their college...

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Professor’s art inspires, raises money for organization
Oct21

Professor’s art inspires, raises money for organization

No one would have guessed the boy playing in the mud during recess would go to grad school, become an art professor and sell some of his ceramic creations for upwards of $65 each. “Mud and boys go together,” Professor of art Dr. Philip Dunham, said. “(I) immediately fell in love with mud.” Dunham has been at the university for the past 22 years. He teaches ceramics I and II, 3D design and sculpture. “There is a parallel perception in my teaching to address a number of problems that focus on formal and psychological issues while stimulating the students to consider and clarify tactics of learning on their own.” During the past 10 years, Dunham has been working to perfect a method for creating unique ceramic crosses. Each cross has intricate swirls or flowers. Once the clay has been formed and becomes “bone dry,” it undergoes the firing process that turns the clay into stone. Dunham said, “When you fire, if you don’t use your technique properly, things can go wrong.” Five pieces Dunham donated were auctioned during family weekend. The $245 raised went to the Crusader Parent Organization, which purchases items such as the big screen TVs in the Mabee Student Center for the use of students. Administrative assistant of Student Affairs Joy Childress said, “To me, (the crosses) make me think of how God is with us. We’re all cracked clay in His hands, and He can take something that is cracked and make something unique and beautiful out of it.” The most common problems in the process are when air bubbles are captured within the clay, or when the clay is too thick or too wet when it is fired. “It will explode … and you will lose your pieces,” Dunham said. When he began making ceramic crosses, he was trying to better his own skills. Because the firing process is particularly risky, he had to learn to take chances. “The technique I had to study on several different types of approaches … in order to see what my percentage of danger would be in firing.” Students in Dunham’s ceramics class agree that the technique takes time to develop. Senior psychology major Meghan Bray said, “So far, my favorite piece to do is the cross. It’s so hard, but it still looks kind of cool … when it’s not sitting next to Dr. Dunham’s.” Sometimes molding the clay takes patience. “It’s very frustrating when you have an image in your head, and you can’t make your clay look like that image,” Bray said. “I imagine that it’s very frustrating when your sculptures blow up in the...

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ROTC program expanded
Oct21

ROTC program expanded

The university has a new program this fall that promotes building bonds with fellow students and teaches how to become a responsible leader in various situations. The Army ROTC organization has now expanded its courses to UMHB. The headquarters for the curriculum is based out of Tarleton University in Stephenville, Texas, but has a detachment in Killeen and on the UMHB campus. Five students participate in the program, while Killeen has about 60 who are stationed there. Among the UMHB students, the leader is Cadet Sgt. Major Alex Petrowski, who is a junior and a criminal justice major. Petrowski was in the Army for two and half years before joining the ROTC program and is excited the campus has joined the program. “UMHB really wanted to have an Army program of their own,” he said. “The university has had an Air Force ROTC program based out of Baylor University for some time now. We just thought there should be an Army detachment,” he said. However, with only five students participating, the program is small. Junior sports management major Ariel Bush is one of the five. Both Bush and Petrowski stress the want and need of new recruits to join and become a part of the new organization. “Army ROTC is a great opportunity and learning experience,” Bush said. “There are many different scholarship opportunities associated with the program for anyone that is interested. Whether you are prior service, active duty, National Guard, reserve or none of the previously listed, it is definitely a life—changing experience, and I love every minute of it.” For those who are nervous about the demands of the Army, the ROTC program prepares people for the commitment of the Army. “As ROTC cadets, we must first learn to be great followers before we are great leaders,” Bush said. “In class we learn all the mechanics of how to lead tactical squad missions, and then we apply what we learned in the classroom to practical exercises. We also participate in land navigation classes, combat water safety training and field training exercises.” Head of the recruiting at UMHB is Major Chris Jay. He was in the Army for more than 21 years and is now trying to get students to join the challenging program. “My main hope for the program is just wanting it to grow,” he said. “The students here at UMHB that have committed to the organization are outstanding.” Jay also believes that, along with building ROTC on campus and recruiting more students, the university can also have an advantage from it. In his eyes, UMHB has the potential of enrolling more students now that...

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Couple tag-teams in Chapel
Oct21

Couple tag-teams in Chapel

By Joshua Thiering Students’ attentions were wrangled and corralled when Candice Meyers, a Christian country singer and former Miss Kansas, and her husband, Rope, a world champion steer wrestler, spoke to students recently during chapel services. Candice Meyers sang and interjected personal words of wisdom to the students. Her first song was dedicated to the “World Changers.” “Have a little faith. You can move a mountain,” she sang. Rope Meyers, whose father was also a world champion steer wrestler, spoke about his history of roping when he was a young adult. He also jokingly dispensed a little marriage advice saying, “When you get married, you find that you lose half of your vocabulary, because your wife has the other half.” Using the illustration of Jesus as a river flowing forth, he emphasized that Christians should have a bottomless faith. “God needs you at a place where you are not ankle deep … you need to move to that place where there is no bottom, where you cannot stand.” With a name like Rope, one could say Meyers was destined to become a cowboy. He said, “It is on my birth certificate: Rope Meyers. My sister’s name is Tie and brother’s name is Cash. They named us that way because you rope the calf, you tie the calf, and you win the cash.” He added, “My dad was a world champion steer wrestler when I grew up. So I wanted to do the same thing. Every little kid wants to play cowboys and Indians. I just got to do it with a real horse.” Where Meyers draws inspiration from his father, Candice Meyers finds inspiration from her favorite country music artist, Martina McBride, and her heroes from her hometown who have walked with God successfully for a long time. “I look at them, and they are 40 years married, their children are raised and grown and they are just as passionate about God as they ever were,” Candice said. Senior history education major Amanda Jane Foss said of the hour—long performance, “I liked that she explained the meaning of her songs, and the significance that they had in her own life.” She also enjoyed listening to Rope’s talk. Foss said, “I really liked that Rope talked about it being a long journey, of just walking day by day, moment by moment with Jesus—that you might walk a thousand steps and only be ankle deep, and keep going and walk another thousand steps until you get to that place where Christ is in control of every aspect of your life.” Other students were a bit more critical. “I thought she wasn’t...

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Plunging economy: What students, parents should know about America’s deepening financial crisis

Jordan Gustin Over the course of a month, the implosion of Wall Street shocked the world and has prompted many to search for the cause. The discovery of denial, greed and rampant corruption is unsettling. The great irony is that clues of the collapse have been around all along. So how could the signs be overlooked, and does it foreshadow the fate of America? A recession is a decline in economic activity (such as a drop in house purchases or a decline of the stock market) for six consecutive months. “There is an almost-certain 99.9 percent chance we are headed for a recession,” finance professor Dr. Larry Woodward said. Woodward offers his advice. “The problem isn’t caused by over-regulation or under-regulation, and we don’t need government to regulate more or regulate less; we need a thoughtful government.” As for whether or not America is headed for another Great Depression, Woodward thinks the only way to follow that path of disaster is if deficit spending continues. How does all this affect college students? Dr. Paul Stock, finance, accounting, and economics chairperson, said, “This crisis might affect college graduates looking for a job in the financial sector. If there is a recession, businesses will be looking to cut costs, and the first place they will cut are the number of employees. Unemployment will go up.” Stock believes that the crisis will impact students’ parents more than the students themselves. He said that parents who are retired “might lose some money in their retirement accounts, and those who are looking to retire in the next three to five years might have to wait. Unfortunately, if there is a recession, there is a good chance many of them will be laid off.” The origins of the financial crisis can be traced back to an act passed by Congress in 1977 called the Community Reinvestment Act. It has essentially forced businesses to sustain a minimum percentage of low-income mortgages every year or risk being fined. These mortgages eventually became the highest amount of loans in any income category. Lenders misled many potential homeowners into higher loans. Just about anyone, regardless of the ability to afford them, was able to take out a home loan. The Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae) and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (Freddie Mac) received preferential treatment from Congress in 1991, giving them an advantage over competitors in that they were not subject to many of the taxes and standards other companies were. This allowed Fannie and Freddie to use their reputable appearance to sell risky low-income mortgages to gullible investors as low-risk investments. The Federal Reserve’s takeover...

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