Crusader policeman tells of deployment
Feb24

Crusader policeman tells of deployment

As a staff sergeant in the U.S. Army Reserve, former campus policeman, Stephen Mosley, is doing exactly what he dreamt of, helping in the military. “Serving my country is something I always wanted to do,” Mosley said. “Serving in the armed forces is not for everyone, but there is a connection that those who do, have that you don’t see anywhere else.” Assigned to the 320th PSYOPS, or Psychological Operations Company, out of Portland, Ore., Mosley was deployed to Iraq in 2008 to do face-to-face communication with civilians, gather information and pass along messages to officials from targeted communities. “I find out what the locals need, like water or power,” he said. “I try and get a feel for what they are thinking and how they feel about the local government, and if they support it or not.” While in Iraq, Mosley ran into Maj. Byron Duke, an executive officer whose twin sons, Denton and Dextor Duke, play football for UMHB. “(It) was one of those ‘It’s a Small World’ occasions,” Mosley said. “We were talking about where we were from, and one thing led to another. Now we talk about Cru football when we are together, and we even give each other the Cru hand sign when we pass on the base and during briefings we both attend.” Freshman Denton Duke said he hadn’t expected his father to tell him he was working with a Crusader employee. “It was so random and a big surprise,” Duke said. The student is encouraged by his father and those who work in the service. “It means a lot to me,” he said. Duke is more than ready to see his father when he comes home to Granbury, Texas, in a few months. “We are close,” Duke said. “We are all looking forward to when he gets back. It’s been hard on our mom, too.” Maj. Duke will be back to the states soon. He is a reminder of home for Mosley , and what he has to look forward to when he returns. Mosley originally joined the Army as an armor crew member of operating tanks in 1995. He then transferred to the reserves in 2001, becoming a military policeman. The MP unit was shut down, so Mosley transferred to the PSYOPS operations where he currently serves. Overseas, Mosley loves experiencing other cultures and talking to different people groups. “I actually enjoy what I do and where I am,” he said. “I get to try new foods and customs. I do miss my wife and son, but I am by no means suffering. I really enjoy serving and will continue to...

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Video of the Week – Feb 9-15

Cute...

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Journey to the Promised Land
Feb10

Journey to the Promised Land

It was probably not the legacy he hoped to leave. Pointing to a collapsed pillar in the ruins of the ancient city of Beit She’an in Israel, guide Hanna Kessler told the sad story of a man who long ago became a permanent addition to the archaeological site. “When the archaeologists excavated this pillar, they found trapped under it the skeleton of a man’s arm and hand,” Kessler said. “Near his hand they found a pile of gold coins, which he was probably carrying in a bag.” Kessler explained the man was likely trying to escape with his life savings from the earthquake that destroyed the city in the year 749. “Probably he didn’t want to go back for the money, but his wife made him,” joked Kessler. “Then she twice remarried while he was stuck here.” Laughing along with her was this year’s group on the 2008 UMHB Holy Land Study Tour. Held each year from December to January, this year’s two-week visit to Israel and Jordan, from December 26 to January 11, was designed as an intensive tour of archaeological and Biblical sites in the two countries. Students can earn credit for a variety of courses in the College of Christian Studies, and in other colleges on a case-by-case basis, by attending the tour and completing additional requirements. Dr. Steven von Wyrick, professor of Christian studies, led the tour just as he has done each year since 1994, when he first came to the university. An experienced traveler who has lived in Israel before, Wyrick believes seeing the Holy Land first hand is of great value for anyone wishing to better understand the Bible. “You cannot understand the Bible apart from understanding the geography, topography, and archaeology of the region in which the Bible was produced,” Wyrick said. The tour group of 25 included 12 current UMHB students and one alumni, but it is also open to any non-UMHB affiliated persons who wish to go. Throughout their time in Israel, the group toured a dizzying array of sites mentioned in the Old and New Testaments. The first few days included a boat ride on the Sea of Galilee and a visit to Capernaum, an ancient fishing village that was the location of much of Jesus’s ministry. “It was so exciting,” junior Christian ministry major David Kline said. “We stood in a synagogue built in the 300’s, and underneath it is the place where Jesus actually taught.” Other highlights included the ruins of Hazor, the first city destroyed by Joshua and the Israelites during their conquest of Canaan, and the imposing hill of Megiddo, surrounded by an expansive...

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Charter day ushers in year 164
Feb10

Charter day ushers in year 164

The University of Mary-Hardin Baylor celebrated its anniversary by placing a wreath on judge R.E.B. Baylor’s grave 164 years after the charter was signed. The gift was given in honor of the founder’s accomplishments. The Campus Activities Board hosted a birthday party in the SUB to celebrate, offering balloon animals and cake to students who decided to join the merriment. The charter provided groundwork for two prominent Texas universities: UMHB and Baylor. Junior elementary education major Melody Haynes takes pride in the university’s colorful past. “UMHB’s rich history means that I am a part of something bigger than me,” she said, “It makes me proud to go to a school that has stood the test of time and come out stronger.” Haynes also feels the departure of President Dr. Jerry Bawcom will be noticeable in the history of the school. She said, “Dr. Bawcom has done so much for this university. After 19 years of service, I think everyone will miss him.” Sophomore biology and athletic training double major Sherissa Hua also noted that Bawcom has been a large influence at UMHB. “He will be greatly missed because he has been a great supporter of our school,” she said, “He constantly cheers for our sporting events and is a great leader. He has taken part in defining our school as a whole just by being there and helping to make changes in even the littlest of aspects.” Hua said that Charter Day is an important celebration because “that was the day our school was born. We would not be here without it.” Sophomore history major Ryan Boyd thinks that one of UMHB’s greatest achievements was the integration of males to the school in 1971. He said, “The fact that I am able to be a part of this prestigious school gives me a sense of pride. I am glad that males are actually able to come here now because we get to experience privileges that we may have not otherwise been able to experience in the past here.” Boyd also added that “UMHB sports would not be what it is today without the integration of men to the school.” The university has a rich history which started 164 years ago, leading to the school’s move to Belton in 1886, followed by the establishment of the first work-study program for women and several name changes. Some notable achievements include establishing the first school of journalism for a women’s college and being recognized as the first Texas Baptist school. The Charter Day chapel featured guest speaker Dwight Edwards, class of 1980. Edwards challenged students not to just exist, but to live....

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Exercise, proper diet, enough sleep lead to better mental and physical health

Living a mentally and physically healthy lifestyle is crucial. Director of Counseling Nate Williams thinks that basic self care can go a long way. “A lot of what I see with students is that they are emotionally depleted as well as being physically sick,” he said. “Watching nutrition and increasing exercise can significantly help mental health. It applies to stress, anxiety, depression and other conditions.” Exam and final weeks, students should make sure that they are getting enough physical activity. “During periods of testing, being consistent with exercise can ease the mind,”  Williams said. “It has a good effect on tension, sleep and mood.” According to the American College Health Association, individuals should not exercise right before going to bed. Morning and late afternoon are the best times. “Do a form of exercise that you like,” Williams said. “Doing something that you hate, will not relieve as much stress. If you don’t like working out in the gym, try ultimate Frisbee or another relaxing outdoor sport. Students can also get involved with intramurals.” Caring for your spiritual life can uplift mental health. “Studies show that the spiritual element is very important,” Williams said. “Being connected with a church brings comfort.” Students need to find a friend that they can express their thoughts to without judgment. “If you don’t talk, your body will,” Williams said.  “Unresolved problems not talked about and processed will increase stress and inner conflict, often leading to physical complaints or illness.” Mental health needs to have a balance with good physical health as well. Coordinator of Health Services Debbie Rosenberger, RN encourages students to be cautious of their eating habits. “A variety of fruits and veggies is needed,” she said. “They may be more expensive but it’s worth the nutrition that you are getting from them. Also, a general multivitamin is a good idea for college students, since most do not eat an adequate diet.” Watching soda intake is also vital to college students.  Not to mention, that the dark soda drinks contain phosphates that negate calcium intake.  Therefore, some may develop weak (or) porous bones [osteoporosis] in later life. “One Coke a day over a year can add 10 pounds in weight,” Rosenberger said. “Supper should also be the lightest meal and breakfast should be the greatest. Your body is ‘breaking the fast’ after sleeping, that’s why it’s called breakfast.” Individuals need to also be aware of the amount of sleep that their body is receiving. “A body that is sleep deprived over a long period of times displays the same symptoms of a body under the influence of alcohol,” she said. “Students need to...

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Ministry’s journey sparks progress
Feb10

Ministry’s journey sparks progress

Historical leaders cast vision, building on the directors of their past and making their own revelation for the future. The student-led organization, Focus, sponsored by the Baptist Student Ministry, has been built on by many, and new leaders leave their marks behind. Focus meets every Wednesday at 8:28 p.m. in Manning Chapel. Since August, the ministry has concentrated on a new yearning for the campus. Sophomore theology and philosophy major Joe Giles is the current student coordinator and has been a part of the ministry since his freshman year. “I got involved with Focus very quickly. In the first two weeks, I was just doing slides, and then, not even halfway through the semester, I was going to the planning meetings.” Giles has been able to see a change in Focus within the last year— a new thirst for God. “There has been much more emphasis on prayer, but beyond that, I think the big change is with the hearts of the students coming,” he said. In the past, students mainly gathered to socialize, but now Giles said their reason for attending has changed the overall feel of worship. “It’s a different atmosphere than last year. This year there is a hunger, such a hunger that people are meeting before hand to pray,” he said. The idea of worship has taken a new shape. “(It) is not a building, speaker or band. Worship is coming fully and submitting yourself fully to God and what God has in store for you,” Giles said. When Focus first started this year, Giles had a vision. “My hope and goal is that people come even hungrier, that it doesn’t stop at Focus, that they don’t think worship is once a week, but they bring worship into their daily lives. And they take their worship experience that they have at Focus, and . . . dive deeper into their own churches.” His prayer is that every Wednesday night, the Focus team and the speakers are able to provide a place of worship and time to focus on one thing: allowing the passions of the students to expand. “I don’t want it to stay confined in Manning Chapel. I want it to spark hearts and lives to be able to do what God has called them to do here on this campus and further,” Giles said. Shawn Shannon, the Baptist Student Ministry director, has been a part the Focus ministry and has also seen changes. “I have seen an increasing student fingerprints on it that students own it,” she said. She has observed not only a boost in attendance, but also more variety. “The Focus crowd...

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