Feeling Fruity
Nov04

Feeling Fruity

Some disguised fruit drinks stack up the calories. A normal calorie count for an 8-ounce smoothie can be anywhere from 125 to 220 depending on the fruit and added yogurt and milk. Also size matters. Most serving sizes are three times the recommended amount. Freshens Smoothies (1 pint 5 ounces) Pineapple Paradise -331 calories Orange Sunrise -385 calories Yogurt Smoothies Strawberry Squeeze -313 calories Peanut Butter Energizer -474 calories Low Cal Mango Beach Smoothie -90 calories Fruit juices are both healthy and great tasting. Some juices have added nutrients such as calcium and vitamin C, but they are already packed with healthy ingredients. Fruit juices are also fat free and have anywhere from 60 to 80 calories per half cup. They have phytonutrients which contain disease-fighting agents. However, everything is good in moderation. Too much juice can result in excess...

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Feeling Energized

Fitness & Wellness opportunities available at Mayborn Campus Center: Free “Cru-Fit” Fitness Classes: Cru-Crunch (abs), Kickboxing, Pilates, CycleFIT Spinning, Power Pilates and Yoga Wellness Wednesdays: Free informative health presentations given by experts in their field. Workouts vary for each individual depending on weight, height and desired outcome. Check out Mayborn Campus Center’s Human Performance Lab to get a free personal workout schedule. The facility offers a foundation for preparing a healthy...

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Feeling Balanced
Nov04

Feeling Balanced

The choice in foods and physical activity affects how one feels today, tomorrow and in the future.Here are some tips to get started: -Make half your grains whole -Vary your veggies -Focus on fruit -Get your calcium-rich foods -Go lean with protein -Find your balance between food and physical activity -Keep food safe to eat The food pyramid has been redesigned from what most of us grew up knowing. Here are some basics to consider: -Whole grains at every meal. -White rice, white bread, potatoes, pasta, sweets use sparingly. -Vegetables in abundance. -Fruits 2-3 times a day. -Plant oils at most meals. -Red meat, butter use sparingly. -Nuts 1-3 times a day -Fish, poultry, eggs 0-2 times a day. -Dairy or calcium supplements 1-2 times a day. -30 minutes of physical activity is required on most...

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Grad student creates fat loss educational program

By Andra Holbrooks Laura Williams, operations manager in the Mayborn Campus Center, came up with an idea that has turned into a full time job, but unpaid. FATLOSS, Foundation for Altered Thinking on Lifestyle, Overweight, and our Sedentary Status ,came to Williams’ mind through her experience. “I’ve always kind of had body issues, and they started way back in high school,” she said. “Good, bad or indifferent, I was always really critical of myself.” Williams’ undergrad degree is in exercise sports science, and she has learned many of the things one needs to know about weight, body fat and living a healthy lifestyle. Since graduating college, she has worked in the fitness industry. “But I could never quite overcome my own personal issues with myself,” she said. “And this isn’t to say that I ever thought I was totally unattractive or overweight, anything like that. I just was overly critical of my body.” Last spring when Williams began graduate school, a “light bulb clicked. I wanted to get my knowledge out there in a way that would be fun and exciting—and free—to anyone.” FATLOSS is an organization geared toward providing educational information and programs to increase physical activity and healthy living choices in Americans. “All the services provided are offered free of charge because no one should be denied the opportunity for good health,” Williams said. Knowledge is key to living a healthy lifestyle. “With as much information and wisdom that I personally have, that’s distressing when you think of all the people out there who don’t have that knowledge and probably have the same issues or worse,” she said. Pressures are all around society, such as TV stars, magazine beauties, infomercials about quick weight loss and fad diets. “It’s not even about your weight. That’s a terrible measurement,” Williams said. “Body fat testing tells you a lot about what weight really is as a measurement of health and fitness. I don’t ever have to think about my weight as long as I do the things I need to be doing to stay healthy.” Williams is not only concerned for the UMHB community, but for Americans all over. “The goal throughout society has to change. Losing weight, being thin or being a certain size should redirect towards to being a healthy person in general. And when you make good choices to become that person, like getting the correct groceries or doing more physical activity, the other will come as a byproduct of that,” she said. Sarah Peterson, one of Williams’ employees, said, “What Laura is doing is really great. FATLOSS has the potential to change the minds of so...

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New deans are welcomed as Crusaders

This year has been one of change, and changes have reached the university in the form of the new deans in the College of Christian Studies and the Scott & White School of Nursing. Both new faculty members have much experience and plan to bring positive changes to their departments and to the campus. Dean of nursing, Dr. Sharon Souter, arrived at the campus in August and has felt welcome by faculty and administration from the moment she stepped into Vann Circle. She said of her colleagues, “I think the majority have been very supportive. We have an excellent faculty.” The things she has enjoyed most so far about the university are “how pretty it is and that the people are very friendly.” Souter intends to implement some positive change in the School of Nursing. Some of her ideas for the program include instituting a new curriculum and possibly acquiring a new building. She said, “This is going to be the best nursing program in the state — possibly in the nation.” Students have enjoyed Souter’s presence in the classroom. Junior nursing major Meg Roe is taking Souter’s Foundations of Nursing class and thinks that she has a love for the Lord and a desire to mold students into great nurses. “Because Dr. Souter has a passion for nursing education, I know that she will excel this nursing program,” she said. “Numerous changes will take place shortly in the Scott & White School of Nursing, but I am confident that all of these changes will be for the benefit of us, the students, here at UMHB.” Roe commends Souter for her ability to make Foundations of Nursing an interesting class. “Learning the theories and legalities of nursing is generally not very fun, but Dr. Souter brings real life application and excitement to the curriculum,” she said. The College of Christian Studies is also seeing excitement in its new building. Dean, Dr. Timothy Crawford, has big plans for the department and is thankful for the privilege to come into a brand-new building and an accepting staff. “Everybody has been really welcoming,” he said, “I have come into a position where I’m a little higher up the food chain than just a new faculty person, and sometimes there are issues that you walk into, but it has been remarkably smooth.” Crawford took over a program previously headed by friend and colleague, Dr. William Carrell. Crawford and Carrell worked together for a number of years at Crawford’s previous school, Bluefield College. Crawford plans on hiring more fulltime faculty for the Christian studies department in order to help ease the load on professors...

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Outreach extended to community groups
Nov04

Outreach extended to community groups

When it comes to extending a helping hand to Bell County, UMHB is not one to hesitate. On Oct. 25, students and faculty went to 15 locations to provide support to the extended community. The event is known as Reaching Out. It is organized by the Student Government Association chaplains, and it happens once every semester. Tommy Wilson, director of SGA spiritual life, was one of the main coordinators, and he said there is much more than just seeking to help others in need. “The biggest thing that I pray students walk away with is that it is not about me. I hear so many times people say you should serve others. It feels good to help someone,” Wilson said. “The reason we serve is not to feel good but to answer the call and command that God has placed on our lives. I pray that students know that we have been given a lot in Christ. So in the same love, we should give a lot to others.” The planning process for Reaching Out is detailed and comes down to being mindful of others. “We must first stop and seek what it is God would want us to do and from there plan the service projects out. We must think of every possible problem that could happen and how to correct it, then go into it praying for the best,” he said. This is Wilson’s first year to be in the position, and he has been gaining wisdom every step of the way. To him it’s about much more than just planning the event and people showing up to serve. “I am learning in all of this how to be a real servant leader and not just someone who holds a title, but to love the body I work with and lead them along the path of Christ.” Dr. George Harrison, director of student relations and community services, has been a part of putting the project together for the past six years. He is always amazed to see how many students attend the event and is grateful to know that each one has come to serve in some form. “Their time is so valuable, and I know that it is a sacrifice. It’s not only the students, but faculty and staff also,” Harrison said. Since Reaching Out started, the locations being helped have extended to places outside of Belton and have impacted surrounding areas. Reaching Out gives a new perspective and connection to the students, faculty and staff because they are ministering in an entirely different setting. “They are working together for a common goal, and they can...

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