University encourages different denominations
Oct21

University encourages different denominations

This institution prides itself on its Christian values and emphasizes the impact that students can make on the world as young adults. The campus is labeled as “Baptist,” but the university embraces thousands of students of diverse backgrounds. The student handbook says that the university prepares students to make a global, positive impact on the world through its “Baptist vision.” Is the Baptist vision that the university instills in each student welcoming to students of other denominations and religions? Sophomore organismal biology major Mike Kroll is Jewish and said that the people on campus have been very accepting and welcoming of his different beliefs. Kroll’s stand-up comedy routine includes Jewish humor, but he is a regular performer and fan favorite at Open Mic Night. His comedy routine and sense of humor have allowed him to have a positive outlook toward people who are critical of his faith. He said, “It keeps me strong in the face of animosity, even though I have not faced too many hard things on campus.” Kroll urges students to “get involved in the other religions, even if it is just a basic knowledge, so that you can strengthen your own faith. It helps you improve as a person.” Sophomore cell biology major Annjelica Madali is Catholic and has encountered discrimination at times because of her beliefs. “Some people are really nice about it and then, of course, there are some that are completely ignorant of the fact that other religions do exist,” she said. Madali also believes that a diverse religion base on campus is beneficial to the student body. She said, “It’s extremely important to have different religions on campus, so that people can learn to not be so close-minded to different ideas and beliefs.” Senior education major Amanda Foss has attended several different types of churches. “I don’t think people think of me any differently knowing that I am or was one denomination or the other,” she said. “I like all three denominations that I have been a part of and love worshiping at all of the different kinds of services.” For the most part, the view on campus is one of acceptance and finding the things each faith shares. Foss said, “I really think we all need to focus on what we have in common among all the different denominations of Christians, rather than focusing on all the differences.” To many students on campus, faith is the cornerstone of who they are and what they do. “My faith affects all of my life. It’s the foundation of who I am, and it impacts the way I try to live my life...

Read More
World War II vets bring insight
Oct21

World War II vets bring insight

In the living room of Troy, Texas resident, Frank Thompson, junior history and political science major Olivia Gustin and senior history major Naomi Johnson recorded the stories of a World War II veteran. Unlike the tales of noble soldiers who went for days without food or water while pulling comrades to safety, Thompson told his story of what each brave soldier did every day. Gustin and Johnson are part of history/political science chair Dr. David Chrisman’s History Inquiry class. Members interviewed vets for the Veterans History Project sponsored by the Library of Congress. “It’s really nice because these are the stories that aren’t being told,” Gustin said. “This is the mass of the military. This is what got us through World War II are guys like him who did their job … ” Thompson was drafted from Texas A&M’s Corps into the Army’s 172nd Infantry Company H and served from February 1943 to September 1945. He fought in the Southern Pacific on the front lines and then returned to Texas to continue farming. Thompson said, “I was glad to give it (his story). I guess if I never give it, nobody will ever know about it.” The interview started for students in the classroom but it quickly grew into pure interest of first-hand experience. Johnson said, “I think what was interesting was a small-town boy from Texas being thrown into a worldwide phenomenon and seeing how he dealt with it.” One of the issues was coping with his brother’s death while he was still fighting in the southern Pacific. The reality of war hit Thompson in a few ways that surprised his interviewers. Johnson said, “There were times where it was very intense. We would ask him questions, anything to do with the combat that he was in. He would put his head down, and we would have to give him about 30 seconds to compose himself because the memories … were still so intense.” The outlook on the war also surprised Gustin and Johnson. “I think the thing that struck me the most, and where I actually expected the opposite, was in how he spoke about the war,” Gustin said. “I think history likes to paint World War II as some sort of patriotic rousing of the country, and that they were all behind it, and that they were all wanting to engage. But (Thompson) said if there hadn’t been a draft, they wouldn’t have gone.” His outlook created a similarity between Thompson and the people he fought. Johnson said, “He didn’t see them as an animalistic enemy. He saw them as boys who were on the front...

Read More
Living waters: Recreational ambitions serve as a ministry tool
Oct21

Living waters: Recreational ambitions serve as a ministry tool

Extreme sports have never been an issue for junior Christian studies major Patrick Muñoz. “If I could use rock climbing, snowboarding or scuba diving in ministry around the world, that would be awesome,” he said. Muñoz grew up in Merida, Mexico, where he began his college career. He graduated from the Universidad Marista with a business degree in 2001. He then hit a crossroad in his life. “I had to decide between work and college,” Muñoz said. “I felt led by God to go into Christian studies.” Muñoz’s father had a job offer in the United States in 2006. “My Dad decided to be in the ministry,” he said. “He is the Spanish pastor at First Baptist Church in Belton.” Muñoz visited his parents a couple of times before deciding what he felt was the right path for his life. “I moved to Belton permanently in 2006 and decided to attend UMHB in 2007.” Muñoz was also interested in athletics as well. “I chose recreation as my minor,” he said. “I have done camping, adventure racing and rock climbing.” His next adventure with extreme sports was scuba diving when he enrolled in a UMHB course this fall. “I have family in Cozumel, Mexico,” Muñoz said. “It’s a wonderful place for diving. I also want to experience cave diving even though it is really dangerous.” Tom Young is the instructor for the scuba diving class offered at the university and has experience with the U.S. Coast Guard and the U.S. Navy. “Scuba diving is a new adventure, something to try … and enjoy,” he said. Muñoz believes scuba diving is a chance to learn how to communicate in a unique way. “I would love to be able to share my experience with others,” he said. “It really is an incredible feeling. How many times do you have the opportunity to enjoy people in silence?  Since you can’t talk underwater, you have to learn to pay attention to people and their body language.” Patrick, Muñoz’s father, believes the sport is a wise choice for his son. “Scuba diving is a good thing for Patrick,” he said. “It is a lesson that he will be able to share with others everywhere.” Patrick Muñoz also created many memorable experiences. “When we were at the bottom of the pool at 10 feet for the first time, it was amazing,” he said. “I was nervous at first. We had to practice drills on how to retrieve our breathing regulator if we lost it. It was a terrible feeling not being able to breathe. But with the training that I had learned, I was prepared.” After...

Read More
Political commentators reach common ground on Cru soil
Oct21

Political commentators reach common ground on Cru soil

By all accounts, Cal Thomas and Bob Beckel should be mortal enemies. Thomas is a conservative columnist and author; Beckel is a liberal commentator and Democratic Party operative. Thomas sings the praises of Ronald Reagan; Beckel ran Walter Mondale’s campaign against Reagan in 1984. Two men could not be more politically opposite. Yet, for nearly two hours, the close personal friends complimented each other, spoke of their mutual love for America and discussed common solutions to serious issues. The presentation, entitled “Finding Common Ground,” captivated a packed house in the Lord Conference Center Oct. 1. It was hosted by UMHB’s College of Humanities and the Institute for the Humanities. Dr. Derek Davis, dean of the College of Humanities, introduced the nationally-known political titans. “One very liberal Democrat and one very conservative Republican are going to talk about common ground, how we can move from partisanship to bipartisanship in American political life,” Davis said. Thomas explained how the two decided to pursue bipartisanship. “We sat in a green room one day, the room you sit in waiting to go on the air, and we saw two people of different political persuasions fighting on the air,” Thomas said. Thomas ridiculed such partisan bickering, contrasting it to the mindset of most people. “Real Americans don’t live this way,” he said. Beckel agreed, accusing wealthy special interests of stoking political conflict for their own gain. Calling them “cheap bums with money who keep the process going because they want to maintain their own interests,” he urged the audience to look past partisan rhetoric. “We don’t believe there is an issue facing this country where people of good will can’t find common ground, and if they don’t find common ground, at least they don’t leave angry,” Beckel said. Thomas and Beckel examined a wide range of current political topics, finding common areas of agreement while sticking to their principles. Discussing the financial crisis, Thomas ridiculed the $700 billion bailout package that had been proposed by Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson while Beckel lamented the bailout but ultimately considered it necessary to stave off an even worse catastrophe. On energy, Beckel argued for expanded alternative fuels while Thomas agreed on the need for more alternative energy and the necessity of both parties to work together for change. “We’re not enemies. We’re fellow Americans. We know what needs to be done with energy,” he said. The message of bipartisanship resonated with Belton resident Philip Smith. “I thought they brought a lot of insight into the real cause of the problem and some good discussion on how people should be able to work together and put themselves above...

Read More

Video of the Week Oct. 20 – Oct. 26

Would you take the...

Read More

Video of the Week Oct. 13 – Oct. 19

Who doesn’t love babies? This baby can give “the eye” even better than I...

Read More
Page 202 of 204« First...102030...200201202203204