A minute with the Love Guru

Think you have love figured out? University chaplain, Dr. George Loutherback, talks about Valentine’s Day and strengthening relationships. Q: How do you know when you’re “in love”? •    A: It’s different things for different people. For me, it was not a moment that I knew, but a process of getting to know (wife) Cindy and sensing her heart. Then God began to warm my heart with hers. It was then we realized this was love. Q: How did you win your wife’s heart? •    A: When we talked about our future and what we hoped to see, I think she saw in me a person that she could respect, a person that she could support his career and be a helper to me, not a competitor. Q: What advice do you have for  young couples in a relationship? •    A: Spend time together, communicate together and just get to know each other. Don’t react on impulses and don’t react on emotions. Spend the time to really get to know the individual and who they are. God will reveal to you if it’s the right one for you or not. Q: What is Valentine’s Day for you? •    A: “Valentine’s Day is a time to say, ‘Hey, I just want to tell you how much I love you and how much I appreciate what you mean to me and all you do in my life.’” Q: What do you think the color red symbolizes for Valentine’s Day? •    A: “HOT! And smokin’!” Dr. L believes Valentine’s Day is meant to be spent around the ones you love. •    “I think Valentine’s Day should be a time for couples. If you’re dating or with your significant other, . . . spend some time affirming each other and just telling each other what you appreciate. It’s the best gift. At times we get so busy that we very rarely take time to affirm each other in a personal way, and those are the special...

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Mind and Money: Connected?
Feb10

Mind and Money: Connected?

In a time of financial despair, when a father is willing to slaughter his wife, five children and then turn the gun on himself because ends will not meet, it’s no surprise that the mind and money are greatly linked. As America faces high unemployment rates, increasing debt and economic instability, such behaviors may become more frequent, and professionals across many occupations are confirming the nation’s recession is not solely a monetary crisis. “Very few people if you ask them ‘who are you?’ start off saying ‘I’m a spiritual being occupying a physical body.’ Most people say, ‘I’m a teacher. I’m a doctor,’” assistant professor of economics, accounting and finance, Danny Taylor, said. His point is that humans derive much of their identity from their occupation. When jobs are disappearing and money is becoming less available, self worth and individuality may also be damaged. Every person is at risk. Dr. Jim King, dean of the College of Business, said the crisis has had a negative effect on college students across the nation. “A lot of them are not able to get the loans they’ve been able to get in the past to even go to school because of the withdrawing of funds or because financial institutions are holding onto money more tightly,” he said. Additionally, many students are not returning to school in order to get full-time jobs because families are experiencing parent layoffs, and all resources have been exhausted, so there are simply no means for paying tuition. “People are looking at lower cost alternatives,” King said. “A lot of UMHB students have to find part-time jobs to cover their own expenses because parents can’t afford everything.” Prospective students will also be affected this fall. “Many will be going to community college to make university funding more affordable,” King said. He believes it is hard to predict how long the nation will be in a recession. “It’s a really tough call,” he said. “Experts are expecting the economy will stay the same for one to two years.” America is in for the long haul. “I don’t know if we’re going to get a lot worse,” King said, “but we’re not going to get better very fast.” One critical part in the healing process is what is being done on the federal government level. President Barack Obama was elected into office on a platform anticipating change. “He was promoting what we would call the economics of hope,” King said. “He created hope in people that his presidency would have a positive impact on people, and part of that would be in responding to the financial crisis. Hope has been...

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Oldham named university provost
Feb10

Oldham named university provost

The long search for university provost ended Jan. 23 after Christian studies professor and interim provost, Dr. Steve Oldham, accepted the permanent position. Oldham’s official position, provost and vice president for academic affairs, means he will serve as the chief academic officer. He will preside over all academic programs and associated faculty. “I see the job as the provost as sort of a facilitator, helping the faculty to do what is most important at UMHB, which is to teach and mentor our students,” Oldham said. “I want to do everything in my power in terms of opportunities, new types of initiatives to help our faculty to flourish.” As he prepares to serve the faculty in their growth, Oldham said he hopes to expand his range of faculty members. “One of the joys of this position, so far, has been the opportunity to get to know the faculty better,” he said. “It is nice to get to know all the excellent people we have across campus.” Working with the president-designate, Dr. Randy O’Rear, is another interesting aspect for Oldham as he anticipates future change. He credits President Dr. Jerry Bawcom’s leadership as a solid foundation to build on. “UMHB is in a very good position right now. There are some growth areas, but there aren’t a lot of wholesale changes we need to make. Yes, we will see some improvements, but we will be standing on the shoulders of what Dr. Bawcom has already achieved here. I am looking forward to Dr. O’Rear’s leadership. He is a collaborative leader. He wants to involve as many people as possible in the decision making, and I think there is wisdom in numbers.” Oldham meets the transition from professor to administrator with excitement and enthusiasm, but the opportunity is also bittersweet. “Teaching is my first love, and it will always be, so it was a difficult decision for me to step out of the classroom and come into an office,” Oldham said. “My interaction with students has certainly decreased. I am not teaching nearly as much as I used to, so it is a big sacrifice.” Although Oldham has moved to different pastures, he will continue to minimally teach, which he said will keep his foot in the door. Oldham and his students have begun to prepare for the effects of his absence as a professor. Junior Christian studies major Geoff Payne said Oldham has played a significant part in his life in and out of the classroom. Payne, an honors student and friend of the professor, has spent many hours with Oldham. He influenced Payne’s ways of reasoning and learning. He also...

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Blog: Wisdom teeth removal
Feb05

Blog: Wisdom teeth removal

Besides occasional jitters and feeling a little bit like a cannibalistic vampire for swallowing my own blood, getting my four wisdom teeth removed wasn’t so bad. I heard people’s scary stories, which they were so giddy to tell, as soon as they heard of my dental appointment (thanks guys). But the dental assistant said, “You’re not nervous are you?” when she checked my blood pressure (which I think was 160 over 90, if that’s good). I was in the dental office at 9:25 am and left with a numb mouth stuffed with gauze by 12:30 pm. Speedy, but quality service. Not often do both come together. They sent me home with a list of rules to follow with warnings from the doctor that if I don’t follow them to the “T” I will experience one or more of the vicious diseases listed on the rules-to-follow page. So far, I can compare it to getting pink eye in elementary school. All the teachers say, “Oh, you need to go home.” So you’re happy. You’d rather spend the day on the couch watching cartoons and eating fruit roll ups anyway. Commercial after commercial is for fun things too, like juicy juice and strawberry Jell-O. Your eye doesn’t really hurt. All the tall people just say not to rub it. No harm. No foul. See you classmates in a couple days. As with all surgeries, it isn’t completely pain free. Like having pink eye, you cringe when mom has to put in those freezing cold eye drops that make you cry. You watch the plastic bottle with the meds get right up in your eye’s grill. I equate the cold eye drops to having to eat soft foods and not being able to rinse my mouth out even when all I can taste is blood. So, instead of “rinsing,” or “spiting” (both of which are band in their rule book) I simply chug. I’ve chugged water, tomato soup, and I’m fixing to move to apple juice. So, when I return to UMHB this weekend, you’re welcome to stop by and eat some Jell-O with me because “every diet needs a little wiggle...

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Blog: Girl Scout Cookies
Feb03

Blog: Girl Scout Cookies

This time of year as girls in green skirts, blue vests or patched blue-jean jackets stand outside of big businesses and gas stations alike, it’s impossible not to retrace my childhood memories. Girl Scout cookie time. It is of the most unpleasant recollections stored in the back of my mind. Daisies, Brownies and Cadets swarm like bees as Wal-Marts open their entryways to young entrepreneurs with over-priced goods. Many years ago, I was one of them. I never fully understood the concept behind the idea of selling cookies to strangers when I wasn’t even supposed to talk to people I didn’t know, much less take their money. But there I was. My fellow troop members and I stood outside no matter if it was raining or cold. (which is why we hated the businesses that had paper towels in their restrooms rather than hand dryers). Hours passed as we watched shoppers go in and out of the automatic doors, our young legs tired and our overactive minds bored. Our leader always said good business women didn’t sit on the job, nor did they bring toys to distract them from their work, so you can imagine how entertaining it became to count how many blue cars were in the parking lot or to sing “I know a song that gets on everybody’s nerves,” the most without messing up. However, every once in awhile, someone would come by who we knew, and they would purchase a box or two and give us the motivation we needed to keep selling. Or there was the sweet lady who came by to buy a box for her friend as a gift and told us how cute we were. But she would leave fairly quickly because we had bombarded her, all trying to render our helpful services. Then there were those customers who pretended they couldn’t hear us. “Would you like to buy a box of Girl Scout cookies? They’re only $3.” Nothing. “Ma’am, ma’am.” Nothing. Now I was only 7 years old and still had a lot of growing up to do, but even at my young age, I knew ignoring a person was disrespectful. People could at least take the time to say “no thank you,” or give us a polite reason, which some did. We heard some good ones. Teachers think students have too many excuses, but they haven’t sold a box of cookies. “I’m on a diet.” “I’m allergic to chocolate.” “My children can’t have peanut butter.” “I don’t carry cash.” “I’ll buy them on my way out of the store.” “I’m a diabetic.” We heard them all! It takes a...

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