MyCampus app causes frustration for students

In a life driven by access to technology, mobile applications seem to keep us in the loop. In an attempt to keep up with the changing times, UMHB released the first edition of its own app in 2012. The app was recently updated and can be found under the title UMHB Cru Mobile in the App Store. One of the biggest reasons for the update is to keep up with the ever-changing mobile software. “The recent update is mostly to be able to support modern iOS and Android devices, said Director of Media Services Matthew Irvine. “There were a few issues on the previous version of the app with newer devices, and we wanted to make sure that we kept up with technology.” The app includes a variety of features, including campus activities and athletic events, a map of the campus, social media updates from the university pages, and various links to the student section of the webpage (i.e. financial aid, cru card information, etc.). A few special features include the ability to view videos or pictures posted to social media under the hashtag #myUMHB, a faculty and staff directory and some fixes for past bugs. The most used feature on the Cru Mobile app is the faculty and staff directory. “ In the previous version, a person had to know the last name of a staff member to find her in the directory,” Irvine said. “Now, it’s simple to search the directory by first name, last name, or even title. We’re pretty pleased with how that turned out.” Though the app has seen major improvements, freshman nursing major Zhari Cooper said it has a few flaws. “I understand the concept behind the app, but a lot of the pages just don’t feel finished.” Cooper said. “Like, the page itself is blank.” Irvine said that even though the app has some issues, the university is continually striving to make it better. “There are many other improvements and bug fixes under the hood. Overall, we’re pretty happy with how the new app turned out. It’s always a work in progress, and we always welcome suggestions for improvement,” he said. The app has a 4-out-of-5 star rating on the App Store for iPhone, and says it is compatible with all Apple products with products with at least the iOS version 7.0 or later. However, it does not specifically say if it is compatible with Android products. “I think the app is a good concept, but isn’t delivered well.” Freshman art major, Katie White said. “It has a lot of links to the internet, and if I wanted to use the internet,...

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Teens don’t see the danger behind popular online challenges

Who doesn’t love a good challenge? Whether you’re participating in one or watching one online, it can be exhilarating to be a part of something semi-dangerous. I know when I get bored or just feel like procrastinating, I’ll go to YouTube and watch challenge videos to see if they are a success or fail. Fail videos are some of my favorite kinds of videos to watch because of the participant’s reaction to the fail. They can be hilarious. The problem is that most people don’t realize that these fail videos are often dangerous and could be life-threatening. Recently the duct tape challenge began gaining attention. In this challenge someone is duct-taped to a chair, or a person just duct tapes their body. Then you see how long it takes to get out. It is making headlines because of a fail that nearly cost someone his life. On Jan. 16, 2016 Skylar Fish, a 14-year-old, and his friends took part in this challenge. During his challenge, he tripped and hit his head on the corner of a window frame, then hit the concrete floor. The fall resulted in Fish suffering an aneurysm and shattering his eye socket and cheek. His mother, Sarah Fish, is currently trying to raise awareness about social media and internet challenges, after experiencing the dangers firsthand. Despite pleas from parents and those who have been seriously inured, these challenges continue to happen. Popular challenges are: the Kylie Jenner challenge, the cinnamon challenge, the knockout challenge, the salt and ice challenge and the knife game, also known as the knife song. The Kylie Jenner challenge was a big social media challenge in 2015. A simple click on #kyliejennerchallenge on any social media platform will bring up thousands of videos of people participating in the challenge. Participants in this challenge hold a glass up to their lips and create a suction. The suction causes their lips to swell, thus creating Kylie’s signature full, pouty lips. But, the damage this challenge causes is both internal and external. The effect of the challenges causes the participant’s lips to temporarily swell up. But the challenge can cause bruising and scarring around the lips, which can cause the lips to be permanently swollen and disfigured. And because the glass isn’t flexible, and there is friction created inside the glass, the cup can break around the lips. This can lead to some serious cuts that could require stitches. Then there is the salt and ice challenge that can cause second or even third-degree burns on the part of the body where the salt and ice were placed. The cinnamon challenge which challenges participants...

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Media to blame for body image issues
Feb16

Media to blame for body image issues

Barbie, known for her blonde hair, blue eyes, thick makeup, and disproportionate body, is debuting a new look in 2016. Due to the growing opinion that Barbie’s unrealistic body has a negative influence on children, Mattel recently announced they are releasing three new body types this year: curvy, tall, and petite. While this is a novel idea, I don’t believe Barbies are behind the ongoing problem of eating disorders and distorted body image for children, teens, and young adults. The root of the problem is the media– not a heel-wearing, able-to-do-every-job-under-the-sun plastic toy. According to nationaleatingdisorders.org, 8 to 18-year-olds spend approximately 7.5 hours on some form of media every day. During this time, individuals are bombarded with ads featuring gorgeous paper-thin, photo-shopped women and handsome, muscular men selling everything from cars to hamburgers, sending a message to impressionable 5 to 25-year-olds that we must go beyond the natural look and strive to be like them. While I don’t think the media should portray women as slobs, I do believe they should show average looking women with wrinkles and cellulite. The average woman weighs about 140 pounds and is 5’4” tall. Most models weigh 23% less than most America women. Other countries are beginning to recognize the problem before the United States. In fact, in Israel, models are required to have a healthy BMI to be featured in magazines and ads. In the United States, the magazines and newspapers slam companies such as Mattel, but yet, they feature a size 0 woman on their next front cover with a feature story about how to lose weight in just 10 days. This is setting a double standard that needs to be addressed. Heavily advertised weight loss programs have become a $33 billion dollar industry, although studies show that half of people dieting don’t need to be dieting. Movies and TV shows are guilty as well. TV shows such as NBC’s The Biggest Loser, ABC’s The Bachelor and The Bachelorette, and many other shows focus on physical appearance. Characters who don’t fit the “ideal” look are generally ridiculed for their appearance while on screen. Dr. Anne Becker, a Harvard alum and professor, conducted a study of Fijian girls and women who had gone their entire life without Western TV until 1995. After just three years with television, 29% of the females were at high risk of eating disorders, compared to the only 13% before the study. Beauty contests such as Miss America and Miss Universe are televised glorifying beauty through evening gown and swim suit competitions. Miss Universe 2016 earned 6.2 million viewers when the show aired in Dec. of 2015. So,...

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More than just a water crisis?
Feb16

More than just a water crisis?

Roughly 3,000 children were poisoned by lead during Flint, Michigan’s latest water crisis. This is a man-made disaster in which every layer of government failed the people of Flint. According to the Oakland Press, “when a pediatrician hears about lead anywhere they freak out.” They freak out because in children lead can have disastrous effects, like poor muscle control, damage to the nervous system and developmental delays. Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, director of pediatric residency at Hurley Children’s Hospital in Flint, conducted her own research and concluded not only that Flint residents had been drinking lead contaminated water for two years, but that lead levels in the blood of the city’s children had doubled from 2.1 percent to four percent. Officials discovered in early October that Flint’s water supply had been contaminated with lead. It wasn’t until January that the situation finally received nation-wide recognition. According to mashable.com, on January 17 Hillary Clinton blamed racism and classism for the contamination, citing that 40.1 percent of Flint residents live in poverty and 55 percent are African-American. Gazing back on history, it becomes apparent that anytime a large amount of African-Americans need help from America it takes a long time for them to receive the help they need. St. Joseph, Louisiana is also experiencing a water crisis, and the government has yet to lend a hand. More than 77 percent of its inhabitants are African-American. In New Orleans before Hurricane Katrina devastated the city, the African-American population was 67 percent. Federal aid was not only late after the hurricane, but insufficient during recovery efforts. The first recorded Africans came to America in 1619. Fast forward from then until now, and it is obvious America’s handling of blacks since then has been less than settling. There was a three-month plus delay in responding to Flint. It took just about that long to respond to terrorism in another country. If one accepts the terms of living in this country and works hard for it, then said person should be able to depend on his or her government to reply in a timely manner. Rapper “The Game” and Russell Simmons stepped up to help, and in the words of Simmons, “I wanted to help to show the government how they should react.” The government’s reaction to the crisis in Flint has left the black community feeling neglected and abandoned once...

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Campus celebrates heritage
Feb16

Campus celebrates heritage

Charter Day is a celebration that never ceases to bring current students and alumni together in awe of the growth of the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor. This year, UMHB’s birthday was celebrated with balloons, cake, and the ceremonial placing of flowers on Judge Baylor’s grave. “We take Charter Day to remember how much Judge Baylor did to build UMHB,” said Student Foundation President Autumn Brewer. “We also pray to God and thank Him for his faithfulness to the school, and we ask Him to continue to pour blessings out to us.” While students might have been motivated to blow out the candles of UMHB’s 171st birthday party because of the free cupcakes, the desire for Crusaders to observe Charter Day has long been a priority. Over the years, Charter Day became an invitation to all alumni to reconnect with their classmates, relive old memories, and continue traditions. UMHB Museum Director Betty Sue Beebe said the university has continued to grow throughout the years. “Although a lot has changed at [Mary Hardin-Baylor], it is great to see the positive changes on campus for students these days.” During Beebe’s reign as Alumni Director, students helped orchestrate these weekend-long festivities, which gave the alumni a chance to see the continued focus on character and diversity in Mary Hardin-Baylor’s halls. The importance placed on community is not new to UMHB, however. A concept kin to activities put on by sororities today was alive and well before the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor even had its current name. Upperclassmen, called Big Sisters, took on new freshmen (appropriately labelled Little Sisters) to mentor, support, and encourage through their first two years of college. Although there is no longer “Bigs” and “Littles” on campus, older students still take younger students under their wing. Brewer said she’s experienced that same sense of family during her years at UMHB. “It was amazing to see smiling faces who care about me and who I get to live life with,” she said. “I had sophomores and juniors pouring into me and supporting me my freshmen year.” Community is one of the cornerstones of UMHB. The gesture that brought the university from Independence to Belton was from the pastor of First Baptist Church Belton at the time. The city of Temple offered UMHB a $30,000 contract, but at the pastor’s insistence, the community of Belton pulled together to raise $31,000, and UMHB transferred to Belton. The pastor found it important to encourage female education, and “Baylor Female College” helped achieve that goal. Celebrating the birthday of the university gives students and alumni the opportunity to look back into time, and to marvel at...

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Exhibit highlights outstanding faculty
Feb16

Exhibit highlights outstanding faculty

Hiking from building to building and class to class, the average student probably walks one mile per day. In that mile, they might think about what activities they will do after classes, but they might not be thinking about how much their professors are impacting their lives. Currently featured in the rotating collection of the Musick Alumni Center & Museum is an exhibit solely focused on former University of Mary Hardin-Baylor faculty.     These are just a few of the professors who have made a difference on campus. There are even more professors to discover in the rotating exhibit at the museum. The exhibit will be open for the duration of the semester, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5...

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