Inside look at upcoming Crusader Fall Sports: Find out how your favorite sports teams are gearing up for the season

Published in the September 14, 2016 issue of The Bells UMHB football isn’t the only sport in the spotlight this fall semester. The Cru soccer, volleyball, and basketball teams are also gearing up for the season. While each team wants to win their region’s conference tournament and advance to nationals, there are also other goals the coaches are keeping in mind. Basketball The women’s basketball coach, Mark Morefield, is planning to win the division and go on to host this year’s conference. And if they don’t get the chance to host, the team aims to win the conference and progress to the NCCA nationals. “I feel good. I think we are finally starting to put our stamp on the program,” Morefield said. The coach admits that this season will have its ups and downs, but he says during this time the team will grow closer together and sharpen each other’s skills. He also hopes to improve their conference record. Volleyball This season the women’svolleyball team will also be going all out for the upcoming tournaments. “We want to win, but there’s a lot more to athletics and being on a team than just winning,” says head coach Rob Frost, “We had a lot of success on the court last season and lost in the conference championship match. We are working hard to learn and get better, and go further this year.” Soccer Women’s soccer is also on the rise this fall. The team has already played some pre- conference games, and are looking forward to representing the university on the field. At this point, the conference championship is the team’s number one goal, according to coach Barry Elkins. “We have gotten progressively better each year and currently have an experienced team,” says Elkins. The soccer team is comprised of returning players, so each player is well versed in her role on the field. They know how each other works, the coach said. The team plans on building each other up, and picking up where they left off last year. The men’s soccer team is also taking the field once again, with more determination than ever before. Head coach Brad Bankhead said the men had a rough start to the season because of rain delays. But an early win has given the team a positive outlook on the season. Forward, junior Caleb Latson said the team’s morale is boosted when the fans show up to cheer the team on. “We want more people out here with energy to cheer us on as a team,” Latson said. “ You know we are doing it for the school and ourselves, and we love...

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Remembering 9-11: 15 years after the tragedy

Published in the September 14, 2016 issue of The Bells It was the deadliest attack our country had ever seen. Thousands lost their lives, and life as we knew it changed forever. Sunday marked the 15th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, and while not everyone on campus was old enough to recall the events of that day, the attack had lasting effects that have touched every generation. “I was in college when 9/11 happened,” Professor Dr. Ted Babin said. “I had a meeting that morning for school, and when I got in the car and turned on the radio, I heard them talking about a plane hitting a building. I didn’t think that much of it, but they weren’t playing music on the radio, so I was confused as to what was going on. “When I got to the school, I waited in my evaluator’s office for a while, and eventually she comes in panicking and talking about planes hitting a building. I still had no idea what was going on, so I decided to go find a television to find out. I remember walking into the dorms and seeing a bunch of people crowding around the TV. By this time, both of the towers had been hit.” Professor Dr. Renate Hood was also going about her normal day that September morning when she heard about the attacks. “My mother called from the Netherlands and told me to turn on the television. The first tower had been hit. I was getting my 9-month old dressed and ready to go to her checkup.” Hood’s most vivid memory of the day was sitting in the pediatrician’s office watching young children running around without a clue of what was happening in the world. “We all wanted to see the news but decided that we needed to show cartoons for the children. Every once in a while we would switch the channel and quickly check if the missing plane that crashed in Pennsylvania had been found.” While neither Hood nor Babin knew anyone who was directly affected by the attacks, they both remember the thoughts and emotions they had that day. “I wasn’t really in fear for my safety,” Babin said. “I mean I obviously called my family to make sure they were okay, but it was more the feeling of uncertainty of what was going to happen next. Was there going to be another plane or was something else going to happen? And how was our country going to change because of it?” Hood had a different perspective, having come from a Western European background. “I grew up amidst terrorist groups from...

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UMHB launches all online program

Published in the September 14, 2016 issue of The Bells This fall, the university launched a new degree program called MyWay. This all-online program is geared toward adult learners who are looking to finish their degrees through Competency-Based Education (CBE). MyWay is set up so that a student pays $3,000 for a six-month subscription to MyWay. The subscription gives them access to “all you can complete” modules and assessments, which are equivalent to lectures and tests. Students are expected to finish at least 12 hours in the allotted six-month period, but are encouraged to do more. Dr. ChrissAnn Merriman, Interim Director for Distance Education at UMHB, worked closely with a team of seven to create MyWay. “This is a 20-month plus initiative that over 100 faculty and staff have helped design and develop.” The preparation of MyWay also included research of what employers were looking for in an employee. This helped the team to structure their degree plans to fit the students’work needs. The degree, labelled Applied Studies and Organizational Leadership, is a comprehensive plan that combines the greatest needs of both the students and the employers. This includes: communication, teamwork, and ability to develop their coworkers. Merriman also mentioned that MyWay is mainly geared towards adult learners who are coming back to get their degree. “There are a lot of students across the country who have credit, but never were able to finish their degree,” she said. “We’ve found that we could help the degree-completers who may have had things happen in their lives that caused them to complete their degree. So, we’re able to help.” Merriman and her team have prepared for the struggles of an online degree program, especially considering that some students haven’t studied in many years. “We’ve really set up some good tutorials for students like how to write an essay. Some of these students have not written an essay in years, so it’s important to help them identify what an essay looks like and what to think about when you’re writing them.” Instead of tests, the MyWay program assesses students’ skills by having them do projects at the end of every module. This reinforces the information the students have learned. “There are not multiple choice or short essay. These are projects they apply potentially to their business or something in their lives or something that’s happening.” The students’ progress is monitered weekly by MyWay Success Coach, Teesha Goosh. “I’m here to encourage, to support, and to interact with students, to let them know that I’m here to serve them,” Goosh said. The success coach said she lives by the model of “serve with...

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The secret life of RD’s: The ins and outs of resident directors

Published in the September 14, 2016 issue of The Bells Most students know resident directors as the adult figures who enforce rules and make sure everyone is keeping their rooms spotless. But, Resident Directors are so much more than rule-keepers. “We manage the building, inform them of the rules, and try to make their [resident’s] experience as pleasant as possible,” Gettys Hall Resident Director Brian Street said. “I think it’s easy to view an RD as a law enforcer, but the conversations we get to have with the students are sometimes overlooked. I think our impact on the students is underestimated.” The university has a team of 13 resident directors who live on-site with the students to mentor them, answer questions, and ensure the overall health and safety of the students in their living quarters. College View Resident Director Rebeka Retta has spent almost 30 years as an RD at UMHB, including 25 years at Burt Hall and two-and-a-half years at College View. She has many memories of her residents and their exploits. “I’ve always thought I should write a book one day about just different things that happen in the resident halls and apartments… I could have a chapter on freshmen, a chapter on sophomores… because everybody does funny things.” Retta fondly recalls an incident with one of her RAs. While Retta was in Burt, one of her RAs made copies of the room check rules and slid the list under the residents’ doors. “When we got together after room check, I said, ‘How’d room checks go?’ and the one who’d slid the note goes, ‘mine went really good, but it was interesting when I went into the room, the papers were right there on the floor where I slid them.” “The next day she came to me and said, ‘I know why the papers are there. I took the sign down that was on the wall to make copies. Look at what the sign says.’ The sign said these are the rules, make sure you follow these rules, and do not remove this sign [from the wall]. When she made that copy, the girls looked down at the floor and they left that paper right there.” Street, who has been the resident director of Gettys for three years, enjoys the camaraderie shared between the male residents. “I think the funniest things are the pranks that the guys try to play on each other. The inside jokes are a lot of fun, especially when ping pong nicknames start.” But there are times when residents do not want to follow the rules, and according to 6-year Independence Village Resident Director...

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Crusaders travel around the globe during summer
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Crusaders travel around the globe during summer

Published in the Aug. 24, 2016 edition of The Bells This summer break gave many UMHB students the chance to explore the world beyond campus and their hometowns. For several of these globally-minded Crusaders, travelling meant doing mission work and bringing the gospel to unreached people groups. From England to Africa, students made an impact all over the world. Jennifer Callaway – Kenya, Africa Sophomore english and Christian studies double major, Jennifer Callaway spent her time at an orphanage in Kenya, loving on the children of Naomi’s Village. She and the rest of the group from the Cottonwood Creek Baptist Church, spent time playing with the children and making them feel special in the eyes of God. “I have had a passion for Africa since I was in the eighth grade,” Callaway said. “I also know the Lord has called me to minister to orphans and so this was a great opportunity for me.” The group also travelleed to nearby communities to interact with local people. Callaway said her personal goal was to have the Lord shine through her and that He was glorified in everything she did. “My favorite experience on the trip was worshipping around the fire in Swahili with the kids at the orphanage,” she said. Sarah Harvey – India Sophomore Christian studies and marketing double major, Sarah Harvey spent two months in India, working with local villages to help in any way she could. The Christian studies major said her trip included more physical labor than she thought it would, but despite the extra work, she saw God in the midst of chaos. Along with physically assisting the people of India, Harvey and her group also went outside of the city a few times a week to share the gospel with the unreached people of the area. The sophomore says she went to India to be solely obedient to the Lord, and that she had a personal goal of finding the unreached people and sharing the gospel with them. Her favorite experience was sitting in a “stuffy” 10 ft x 10 ft room with 25 other believers. “The Indians were singing in their native language and my partner and I were singing in English. I closed my eyes as we praised the same Father in all different languages. It immediately reminded me o Revelation 7:9-10, ‘After this I looked, and behold, a great multitude that no one could number, from every nation, from all tribes and peoples and languages, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes, with palm branches in their hands, and crying out wtih a loud voice, ‘Salvation...

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Cru football makes final preparations for the 2016 season

Published in the Aug. 24, 2016 issue of The Bells Fall weather is the beginning of many things: cooler weather, flannel shirts, and football. The team has been practicing since late this summer, honing their skills and preparing to make a run at the championships. “We play three teams ranked in the top 25,” says Head coach, Pete Fredenburg. “..so it gives us a great opportunity if we can win those games. It’d be really special, but we also know its a huge challenge. We’re just trying to maximize their potential.” Strategically, Cru Football plans to open up their offense. The key to this move is their wide receivers, whom Fredenburg has said are “very talented.” “We’ve got to put the ball into their hands,” he said. Defensively, Fredenburg is looking for consistency and a more aggressive approach to covering their opponents. Cru football is notorious for being exceptionally good, but that doesn’t mean the boys don’t work for their wins. “It’s a grind everyday,” said sophomore running back, Braden Murphy. “It’s just like having a [real] job. It’s like anything else in real life, it teaches you a lot of discipline. You [have to] get up every morning and be ready to give your best.” Sophomore quarterback Holten Einkauf said the team isn’t satisfied with average. “If you’re satisfied with average, then that means you aren’t willing to get better,” Einkauf said. Everyday you wake up, and you want to get better and better than the day before. Once you realize that, you’ll be successful.” Fredenburg mentioned several players worth keeping an eye on this season. “Blake Jackson is going to be our starting quarterback, and I think he’s developed into an outstanding player and leader. It’s been fun to watch him grow and develop. He also mentioned that junior linebacker Matt Cody has also established himself as a real positive leader. Fredenburg thinks both will represent the program well.” Fredenburg is going into his 19th season with the university, and hopes that being here has left a lasting impact on his players. “I think they’re very dedicated to this program and to the team and the university, and that’s the special [thing] about playing here. The guys really take a lot of pride in representing the school and doing it in a real special way,” Fredenburg said. Our boys uphold the tradition of faithfulness and devotion, both on and off the field, giving school spirit to all they encounter it. Coming off of an impressive 11-2 record in the 2015 season, the boys of fall are back in action on Sept. 3 facing off against Ohio Wesleyan...

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