Weathersbee departs from UMHB: Director of Student Life makes difference during time at university

Published in the December 7, 2016 issue of The Bells Earlier this fall, Dr. Byron Weathersbee, Vice President of Student Life, announced his departure from the university following the end of the semester. Weathersbee and his wife, Carla, have accepted positions at Summer’s Mill Retreat Conference Center in Belton. “This place has been incredible,” Weathersbee said. “We have mixed emotions. We’re excited about what we’re going to do, but yet…we will greatly miss the students and the student interaction; no question.” Weathersbee, affectionally referred to as Dr. B, has served at the university since the fall of 2009. During his tenure at the university, he has seen and helped implement many changes on campus. “It’s been a phenomenal time to be a part of UMHB’s history,” he said. “When we came here in 2009, it was before we built these $100 million worth of facilities, so we’ve gotten to see those facilities being built. I’ve really been riding on the coattails on some phenomenal leaders.” Weathersbee spends his time working with the deans and directors of campus recreation, spiritual life, student organizations, campus activities, intramurals, career services, the health center, and judicial affairs to make sure that students are receiving everything they need during their college experience. “One of the things that UMHB does so well, and what drew me to this place, is that we’re very student friendly,” he said. “Students are the very centerpiece of what we do… I hope that we’ve been able to have an impact on seeing that happen.” The Student Life division has had several notable accomplishments under the leadership of Weathersbee. In the past 7 plus years, Student Life has established new Game Day traditions/events such as the CRUise, the Cru Spirit Dance, Welcome Weeks’s Spirit and Traditions rally. They also created a Network of Christian Minsters, which evolved into “ONE.” The divison also helped usher in Sodexo’s transition to Bawcom Student Union, as well as, helped oversee changes in various programs such as Stunt Night, Family Weekend, Miss MHB Pageant, and others. Junior history major Danny Kown works closely with Dr. Weathersbee due to his involvement with Student Government Association. Weathersbee works diligently with the SGA to decide on important issues that will affect the student body. “Dr. B has really helped me grow as a leader,” Kown said. “Being in Student Government for the past two years and really getting to help serve alongside Dr. B has been nothing short of a blessing. I hope that wherever he goes in life it will serve him well.” Kown fondly remembers the time Dr. Weathersbee helped him film a parody video of...

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United States honors veterans

Published in the November 16, 2016 issue of The Bells According to military.com, legislation was passed in 1938, that November 11 would be “dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be hereafter celebrated and known as ‘Armistice Day.’” This was specifically to commemorate the first anniversary of the end of World War I and to honor veterans who served during this time. In 1954, after having been through both World War II and the Korean War, the 83rd U.S. Congress and President Eisenhower amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word “Armistice” and inserting the word “Veterans.” With the change, Nov. 11 became a day to honor American veterans of all wars through all times. Veterans Day is not to be confused with Memorial Day. Military.com states that Memorial Day honors service members who died in service to their country or as a result of injuries incurred during battle. Deceased veterans are also remembered on Veterans Day, but the day is set aside to thank and honor living veterans who served honorably in the military — in wartime or peacetime. Fun Facts about Veterans: -7 million veterans served in the Vietnam War era (1964-1975) -2 million veterans served during the Korean War (1950-1953) -5.5 million veterans served during the Gulf War (Aug. 2, 1990- Present) -16 million Americans served during World War II (1941-1945), 620,000 of which are still alive -2 million veterans are...

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ASTRA club hopes to serve community

Published in the November 16, 2016 issue of The Bells You might be asking yourself, what is the Astra Club and what do they do? Astra Club stands for Ability Service Training Responsibility and Achievement. Astra Club has been on campus for three years and focuses on helping the community. Not only do they get involved in the community, but they are also international. One of the Astra Club’s members, junior nursing major Arissa Rosales, has been a member since her freshman year. “One of the Astra Club’s missions is to help the community, and work as a group as God wanted us to,” Rosales said. She said she enjoys the club because she has a passion to do good for the community. She loves the Astra Club because she can help in a variety of ways. One of the ways the club serves the community is by helping the organization Feed My Sheep. Feed My Sheep helps provide meals for students who rely on the free school lunch program. During winter and spring breaks Feed My Sheep packs lunches and gives them to those who do not have food at home. Rosales believes that partnering with Feed My Sheep is a way for the club to have an even larger reach. “Since joining the club, I have made lots of friends and feel a connection with everyone involved in the club,” she said. “I would love to continue with the organization after I graduate.” Junior computer science major Keznyc Walton said that one of the missions of the Astra club is to go out in the community and give back. Walton has been a part of the organization for two years and got involved when his Cru leader suggested that he join. “I love that the organization is very hands- on. I also like that there are opportunities to serve people internationally, and anyone is able to participate,” he said. One of these opportunities is the ability to send a bucket to Africa with basic necessities. He also enjoys the connection he has with everyone in the club. “Everyone is friendly and they all love giving back to the community. The organization is very low-key and that’s what I love about it.” And when they’re not giving back to the community they are hosting events here on campus. In November, the club hosted Sadie Hawkins dance in the Mclane Great Hall and the profits went to a women’s homeless shelter called The Well. Senior nursing major Ricky Sanchez, a new member of the club, was excited to be a part of it. “I wish I could’ve became a...

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Campus crowns Miss MHB 2017

Published in the November 16, 2016 issue of The Bells A crowd of parents and students sat anxiously Saturday evening in Walton Chapel, waiting to see who would become Miss MHB 2017. As a hush fell over the spectators, Miss United Way, Bridgit Sillman, was announced as the competition’s winner. After the announcement, the junior education major’s fellow contestants ran to hug the newly-crowned pageant queen and celebrate her victory. “It still doesn’t quite feel real,” Sillman said. “My com group leader texted me that night and asked how do you feel, and my response was exhausted but also wide awake, overwhelmed but also really calm, still pretty sure it’s all a dream. That’s kind of still how I’m feeling, it doesn’t feel real.” Despite her dream-like state, the new Miss MHB wowed the audience and the judges with her emotional performance of “Fight Song,” in American Sign Language. Sillman has always had a passion for the language and children with special needs, especially those who suffer from emotional disorders like her brother. “I see my platform as more community-based versus campus-based because it affects more people in the community then it does on campus,” she said. “I am a firm believer in early intervention, for all special education. The sooner you’re able to implement behavioral modification, the better.” Sillman also believes helping children and other community members who suffer from such disorders will not only help these people, but it will also help to erase the stigma associated with emotional issues. While the education major is eager to start work on her platform, she is still reveling in the experience that was pageant and the friendships she made along the way. “It was really hard because those friendships didn’t come until the end for me, but throughout the last few weeks we were able to open up and be transparent about how this all was affecting us,” she said. “We all sacrificed so much to do this, it wasn’t just a piece of cake. Being transparent was really something that I learned throughout this entire experience.” Sophomore journalism major, Felicia Suominen, who represented Gettys Hall, echoed Sillman’s feelings about the sisterhood that arose from the shared pageant experience, and said she also learned a lot about herself. The Miss MHB Pageant has become a highly-anticipated event each year not only because it is entertaining, but because it portrays the women of the university in a positive light. The contestants are not only celebrated for their outer beauty, but for their inner beauty as well. Hundreds turned out for the last night of competition to see the crowning and...

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Election leaves nation divided

Published in the November 16, 2016 issue of The Bells The 2016 Presidential election began in mid-2015 when twelve Republicans and two democrats announced their intention of running for the presidency. Over the next few months the candidates were wittled down to two candidates—Billionaire Republican nominee Donald Trump and Democrat nominee Senator Hillary Clinton. On Tuesday, Nov. 8, the candidates went head-to-head in a nail-biting election. In the early hours of Wednesday, Nov. 9, it was announced that Trump and his running mate Indiana Governor Mike Pence had officially reached the 270 mark in electoral votes. The Republicans also won the majority in the House of Representatives and the Senate. According to CBS News, this will be the first time since 1928 that the GOP has had control of the White House, the House, and the Senate all at the same time. Trump will officially take office January 20 on Inauguration Day when he and Pence will be sworn into office. Trump addressed the nation early Wednesday morning following the announcement of his winning the presidency. “For those who have chosen not to support me in the past, of which there were few people, I’m reaching out to you for your guidance and your help so we can work together and unify our great country,” Trump said. Director of Political Science program Dr. Janet Adamski held a watch night party at the Townsend Memorial library for students and faculty to watch the results leak in on election night. Dr. Adamski holds a watch night party every election. “I figure it’s our civic duty to pay attention to what’s going on and be involved and make it easy for all of us to come together and know what’s going on… Government isn’t something that happens to us. We’re a part of government,” Dr. Adamski said. Americans across the globe have mixed feelings including fear, rage, and happiness over the results of the election. “I was not completely excited when they announced Donald Trump’s presidency as he was not my first choice,” sophomore journalism major Felicia Suominen said. “I come from a Mexican family and sometimes his comments were a bit offensive to all of us. But I do hope he proves me wrong, and I hope the community will come together instead of tearing each other down.” While some were apprehensive about Trump’s victory, others were excited about the business mogul’s win. “As the results unfolded, I was shocked at how much the country was rooting for Trump,” sophomore political science pre-law major Tyler Baker said. “I did not expect that he would win the election, but I was glad...

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Student react to campus-wide cricket invasion
Oct26

Student react to campus-wide cricket invasion

Published in the Oct. 26, 2016 issue of The Bells They come by the thousands every fall, ravaging the streets and buildings of the university, hopping on unsuspecting victims, and causing terror amongst students. Their cold, dark eyes show passing victims no mercy. These detestable, abhorrent, horrific creatures are — crickets. Laura Beverly, a freshman studying mathematics and history with teacher’s certification, has witnessed the cricket attacks firsthand. “I had to kill two crickets in my room on the third floor. Another two, or maybe three, jumped in my hair. The funniest thing that happened though was everyone freaking out when there was a cricket at [my friend’s] dorm.” Another student, sophomore graphic design major Chriscina Lampkin has also dealt with the cricket infestation. “I thought the cricket invasion was really weird,” Lampkin said, “I’ve never seen crickets swarm like that anywhere. It didn’t even happen last year, so I’m still pretty confused.” According to CNN, the reason for the cricket plague is because of low temperatures. As a result, the crickets gather around places that are well-lit and mate – creating a swarm of annoying obstacles. “They were really bad at Mabee,” Lampkin said. “Before you walked in near the post office, they were all huddled in the corner. Not even just on the ground, but on the walls and the ceiling too. I was trying to avoid stepping on them, and I had to stop and look at them. One of them was dead and the other cricket was just sitting on top of it. I was just like, ‘are you mourning?’” “The crickets are gross,” said junior marketing major Kelly Carlin, “I work at Mayborn and when I had to go wash towels, the gym had crickets and it was disgusting.” While not a threat to people, the cricket’s erratic and unpredictable jumps can cause anyone to go into a frenzy. “I work at Academy and they were really bad the first night they came. They were swarming the lights, falling out of the sky, and jumping off of the shelves,” Lampkin said. Thankfully, many of the crickets at the university have died off. Unfortunately, that means there is dead cricket smell in the air. “Crickets have a smell. Not even a smell, but an odor. They smell like bad cat and dog food,” Lampkin said. There are still some crickets hopping around campus, determined to stay alive. Luckily, there are a few ways to get rid of the little buggers. Carlin suggests a good way to get rid of a cricket is to use a vacuum. Lampkin says that she sprayed Home Defense in her...

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