Students experience new side of Gospel while preparing for pageant
Mar29

Students experience new side of Gospel while preparing for pageant

Published in the March 29, 2017 issue of The Bells What if you could be a part of a story that’s greater than yourself? It is a story so amazing, it has been passed down for around 2,000 years. It is a story of resurrection, salvation, and an everlasting love. The story is that of Jesus Christ’s life, death and resurrection, and the university puts on an annual pageant to portray these events. Students have participated in this tradition for the past 77 years, and will once again take the stage for the 78th time on Wed. April 12 at 12:30, 3, and 5:30 p.m. The Easter Pageant has been ingrained in UMHB culture and has become a huge community event. Hundreds of people from all around gather to view the Easter Pageant. The pageant is not only life-changing for those who watch it, but also for those who participate in the program. The director of the program, senior Christian studies major Maddie Rarick, has been involved with the Easter Pageant for two years. During her second year at the university, she helped Student Foundation transport alumni to a reception after each showing of the Easter Pageant. Last year, she co-led the costumes committee. Rarick says that everyone, regardless of what roll they play in the Easter Pageant, can learn something important from participating. “The beauty of being in the Easter Pageant is that you get to see the Gospel story from a different perspective,” Rarick said. “If you are a crowd person, you get to see the Gospel and Jesus from the perspective of the crowds that followed or despised Christ. If you’re on the props committee, you get to see what physical objects Jesus used, and thus see his humanity in new ways. If you’re the director, you get to see all those perspectives come to fruition in the minds and hearts of those in the Easter Pageant.” The director believes students should be involved with the Easter Pageant to see the Gospel in a new way and to be a part of a joyful tradition on campus. Franklin Groseclose, a junior Christian Studies major and assistant director of the Easter Pageant believes this year’s performance will be one of the best. “I think this year is going to be awesome. Every year God has given UMHB the gift of clear weather and this year has been no different,” Groseclose said. “As more and more people show interest I, as well as the other directors, become more and more excited. This portrayal of the death and resurrection of Jesus has touched so many, and I can’t wait...

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Spring  Revival: A chance for  ‘new  beginnings’
Mar29

Spring Revival: A chance for ‘new beginnings’

Published in the March 29, 2017 issue of The Bells Spring is here, everything is new and full of life. And this year’s Revival commitee is ready to boost students’ faith with this annual event April 3- 5 at 7 p.m. in the Quad. This three day event focuses on worship and helping people strengthen their spiritual lives. Revival also brings together an assortment of people from different social and religious backgrounds and gives them the opportunity to worship together. This year’s theme for Revival is “New Beginnings.” “We pray that no matter where you are in your walk of faith, even if you don’t have one, that you can have a new beginning with the Lord,” said sophomore education interdisciplinary studies major Sara Lindsey. Lindsey said the whole purpose of Revival is for people to feel welcomed and come closer to their Savior. “We really want everyone to feel accepted. Revival is for all people. We encourage students, staff, faculty, and people within the Belton community to come,” said sophomore Christian studies major Samuel Kinnin. This year the guest speaker will be Clint Paschell, and the band is the Robbie Seay Band. “We will enter a time of worship with the band followed by the speaker’s message pertaining to the topic of New Beginnings,” Kinnin said. “Following the message, we will split up and spread out into small groups and talk with one another about the things we heard and answer discussion questions.” Kinnin said small groups are a time to be open. Every single leader is here to encourage and uplift those who participate. “People can also feel free to pray with one of the steering committee members,” he said. “Revival will end with a closing prayer and a song” Revival Co-directors, Abigail Smith and Ashley Hastings, have spent many hours prepping for this event. They started the planning process last April. The rest of the steering committee began planning in November. This group of students has worked hard to make sure Revival is a success and many people feel refreshed in their faith. “The effects of Revival are amazing,” Lindsey said. “We start worshiping and you look around the tent and you see that God is so strong at Revival and that he is working through us. It is such an amazing feeling.” So, if you are looking for a renewed faith, for a chance to worship with a large group of people, or if you are looking for encouragement in a new faith, then Lindsey recommends checking out this event. Just remember to look for the big white tent in the...

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Foreman delivers McLane Lecture Heavyweight champion shares message of perseverance and faith
Mar29

Foreman delivers McLane Lecture Heavyweight champion shares message of perseverance and faith

Published in the March 29, 2017 issue of The Bells Heavyweight champion, minister and entrepreneur are just a few roles George Foreman is known for by his adoring fans. On Wed. March 22, Foreman shared personal life experiences with faculty, staff and community members during the annual McLane Lecture sponsored by Elizabeth and Drayton McLane Jr. The lecture began with McLane introducing Foreman by describing a few of his accomplishments, including fathering 10 children, five of them named George. “I was in the room one time and somebody asked him why he named them all George, and he said, ‘if you’ve been hit in the head as many times as I have, you’d name them all George too,’” McLane said to a burst of laughter from the audience. Foreman set up his lecture by telling about an experience he had sharing his past with one of his sons. He began with his childhood in Houston’s 5th Ward, where he frequently skipped school. As a teenager, Foreman began stealing and mugging people with other boys in the neighborhood. After one such mugging, Foreman had to hide from the police underneath a house and cover himself with sewage slime to keep police dogs from sniffing him out. “I said if I get out from under this house, I will never steal anything again.” Foreman then joined the United States Department of Labor Job Corps to get a fresh start. While at the job corps, Foreman became interested in amateur boxing. He decided to transfer to California to go to boxing school. A year later, he earned a spot on the 1968 US Olympic team, where he competed in Mexico City. “My mom never wanted me to box. After I told [my mom] I was fighting a Russian, she didn’t even tell me to hurry home and eat, she said, ‘well, bye.’” Foreman defeated the Russian boxer to become the Olympic Gold medalist in boxing. “That was probably the happiest moment I’ve had in my athletic career,” Foreman said. “For the first time in my life a dream had come true.” Foreman began his professional boxing career after the Olympics. He fought in many matches, before he was matched against the reigning heavyweight champion of the world, Joe Frazier. “Joe Frazier was the type of fellow that they said you hit and he liked it. If you missed him, he got upset… He had beaten everyone.” Foreman knocked out Frazier during the second round to become the heavyweight champion of the world. “I stood in the ring, and I was all those [former] champions in that moment.” Foreman also recounted his famous...

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Student art exhibit now open
Mar29

Student art exhibit now open

Published in the March 29, 2017 issue of The Bells The university’s art program has officially opened its doors to the annual student art exhibit. Student artists submitted 107 pieces of art and only 45 pieces of art were selected to be displayed in the gallery. Earlier this year, students were encouraged to submit up to three peices of art to be judged for display by this year’s art judge: Patrick Veerkamp. Veerkamp was an art professor for over 30 years at Southwestern University in Georgetown and recently retired. Veerkamp and a few selected jurors went through the works of art and chose the ones that are currently displayed in the gallery. The art department believes that having an outside opinion come and judge the art pieces will give students an idea of what they’ll face outside the walls of the university. Art professor Hershall Seals doubles as the Department Chair & Director for Baugh Center for the Visual Arts Art Gallery. “The quality is definitely there, and the judge chose very good works,” Seals said. Seals believes this art gallery is a good learning experience for students, and provides different experiences through the artworks displayed. Students can get a sense of validation for the work that they put into their peices and can see that it is appreciated by others. Seals said his favorite thing about hosting this event is seeing the comaraderie between the students. “They’re learning about each other’s art. Students whose works aren’t a part of the show still take part in the process, and exhibit and are encouraged to re-enter later on,” Seals said. During the contest, there were 20 students who received an honorable mention: Laura Yates, Callie Millegan, Isaac Barnhill (two awards), Erin Dona, Rebekah Brooks, Rebecca Macias, Anastasia Hale, Tori Redding (two awards), Jessica Theilacker, Samantha Juarez, Patti Cummings, Chriscina Lampkin, Madeline Hernandez, Ariana Baptiste, Ariel Davis and Courtney Vela. Rebekah Brooks won “Best of Show” for her watercolor painting “Moody, Texas Fever Dream.” Brandon Luna won third place for his set of porcelain vases entitled “Amber and Blue, Mystery and Black, Celadon and Amber.” Maria Ramos won second place for her digital painting “My traditions, heritage and culture.” And Danielle East won first place for her sculpture “An Ode to Those Who Know Why the Cage Bird Sings.” “I feel like all my work paid off and all the time I spent in college and being an art major will work out,” East said. The art gallery is filled with sculptures, drawings, paintings, photography, and much more. The gallery will be open until April 7 in the Baugh Center for...

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Cru alumnus credits strong faith to UMHB
Mar08

Cru alumnus credits strong faith to UMHB

Published in the March 8, 2017 issue of The Bells Director of Development Kelly Boggs started his position in 2015, but this isn’t the first time. Boggs has become a part of the UMHB family. Boggs became a Crusader for life as a student in 1981 and graduated in 1985. Boggs double majored in Religion (now known as Christian Studies) and Sociology. After graduation he attended Southwestern Seminary in Ft. Worth. Prior to taking his position at UMHB, Boggs spent sixteen years as a pastor. “I was a pastor of three churches in Central Texas and one near Portland, Oregon.” Boggs said. He also held the position of the editor of the official news journal of the Louisiana Baptist Convention for nine years. In addition to that position, Boggs also wrote a weekly column for the Baptist Press for fourteen years. The university has given Boggs many good memories, but he said that the best memory was the day he met his wife. “We met during the summer of 1982 when she came to UMHB. Mindy was working in the Business Office located in Sanderford. I was working at a camp in east Texas that summer, but was on campus during a break,” He said, “I came in to say hi to Ms. Betty Bounds, and she introduced me to Mindy, who had just started at UMHB. The current Bursar’s Office is the exact spot where I met my wife. It is holy ground.” Boggs and his wife have been married for 30 years and have four children, one of whom is working on their masters degree at UMHB. Boggs feels so blessed for the opportunities that UMHB has given him, and being a student at the university really impacted his life. “I was a new believer when I came to UMHB,” he said, “The encouragement I received from students, faculty and staff in my walk with Christ had a huge impact on me.” One of the many people that helped shape him into the person he is was English professor Mary Long. “Long is the epitome of what I believe a Christian should be. She took time and helped me academically as well as personally. I will be forever grateful that God engineered the circumstances for me to attend UMHB so I could encounter people like Long.” One of his favorite things about UMHB is the friendships that he was able to make while in school. These friendships were not just limited to his peers, but to the faculty and staff as well. “Many of those relationships [made at UMHB] continue to this day,” Boggs said. There are...

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Association of Black Students hopes to unite campus
Mar08

Association of Black Students hopes to unite campus

Published in the March 8, 2017 issue of The Bells With over 60 current members in the Association of Black Students, this growing club continues to work toward one goal: to form unique and genuine relationships between all students, regardless of their ethnic background and to spread awareness of black culture throughout campus. “The Association of Black Students is a club that strives to bring the university’s diverse population as one, while also making it understandable to students what it means to be a black student on a college campus,” ABS event coordinator Nicole Ikefuna said. “It also provides an avenue for black students to interact with other races.” Ikefuna said that anyone can get involved in ABS by coming to one of the group’s meetings, paying dues, and being involved with the different events they host on campus. “There is so much to gain from becoming a member of ABS,” she said. “People can gain knowledge as to how to deal with others and be a part of a community and a family. And most of all, they can gain experiences that will help mold them into who they will become.” The coordinator said she has personally gained an understanding and love for others by being a part of the group. “I love getting to meet people from different backgrounds, and those who have been in similar situations,” she said. “I have been able to appreciate where we all come from and appreciate that we all have different views.” ABS is more than just a club, it’s a way for members to experience different cultures and gain experiences they might not have otherwise. “We put on many events throughout the semester,” Ikefuna said. “For example, with February being Black History Month, we had a keynote speaker, CJ Wilson, come and speak to us. He talked about what it means to be black and Christian. We also have many different get-together events, which are like little mixers, where all members can meet and get to know each other.” The club even has a buddy system in place, where members can find someone in the club with similar goals or someone they feel comfortable expressing their goals to. And through this partnership, they are able to hold each other accountable and make sure they are making steps toward achieving their goals. “We also have outings where we go out and do things together,” she said. “For example, a couple semesters ago we went to a STEP show and this past semester we went to the Southwestern Leadership Conference, which was a really cool experience.” The group is now working on...

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