Who produces and distributes the Stall Street Journal?
Feb08

Who produces and distributes the Stall Street Journal?

Published in the February 22, 2017 issue of The Bells When students go into public restrooms on campus, there is a good chance they’ll see a bright, cheerful newsletter on the stall door. The Stall Street Journal gives helpful information on campus events and provides tips on maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The Journal was created in 1998 by the former campus nurse, Jeanne Duphree, who got the idea from going to Chili’s and seeing scores posted in the restroom. Depree knew that the article would have guaranteed readership, so she brought the idea to UMHB. The publication was a collaboration between several staff before the secretary of Health, Counseling and Testing Services, Heather Hansen, took over the job five years ago. Now she writes, designs, and distributes the Journal. Hansen said that many students are surprised when they find out that the journal is produced by the Health, Counseling, and Testing Services. “It’s kind of fun that way. [The students] are like, ‘I wonder who writes it,’ … I was putting it out in the bathrooms, and one of the student workers said ‘y’all write that? We love that.’ It seems to be pretty popular, and everyone seems to like it,” she said. The template Hansen uses was created by art students when she first took over the journal. “We had a competition where they could create the template, and then we chose one. We’ve had that one for a while, so we’re probably going to do something like that soon to freshen it up a bit.” Hansen gets her writing inspiration from the counselors and the trends they see from the students who come into the center. The journal is a helpful and easy read for students and faculty. “The information about physical health, mental health, and spiritual health is what we want to get out to the students,” she said. “We put in whatever we think will be relevant to the students. But we also address some things that the faculty can relate to.” The February issue focused on taking care of the physical body because Feb. 22 through March 4 is Eating Disorder Awareness Week. The issue included tips on investing in yourself, attitudes toward weight and self-worth, and eating disorder statistics. The issue also includes urls to websites such as Huffingtonpost.com, counseling.uogregion.edu, and eatingdisorderhope.com, along with information about when food spots on campus are open. “The 18-24 age group is really affected by eating disorders, so we always make sure we talk about that every year at this time.” Freshman nursing major Lauren Houston said she often reads the Stall Street Journal. “I like it...

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Sodexo offers specialty nights, 1845 Grill serves breakfast
Feb08

Sodexo offers specialty nights, 1845 Grill serves breakfast

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells The dining hall has gone through many changes since its inception. Most recently, students saw the cafeteria-style dining moved from Hardy Hall to the new and improved student union, Bawcom. Now there are even more changes coming to the dining process on campus. Recently, the dining hall (which is open to all students, but more namely those living in residence halls) has begun doing specialty dinners. Specializing in one particular type of meal makes it easier for students to decide on where they want to eat that night. Some of the specialty nights have included meals such as classic southern chicken dinners, burger and pizza dinners, and various other southern, home-grown classics. These nights have been successful in pleasing the university community, including students and faculty alike. Eating in the dining hall can be the quite the experience for all, as the buffet tends to offer many varying options to appeal to the Cru community. Whether students are eating in the dining hall with friends, to wandering in 10 minutes before class for a quick bite, many Crusaders have a positive tale to tell when speaking about their dining experiences. “There are a few things students should know about eating in the dining hall,” says Elizabeth Sawatzki, sophomore Spanish major and Sodexo employee. “We are now not allowed to put ice cream in cups for those who enjoy root beer floats, but you can transfer it yourself manually.” The dining hall employee said for another dining hall treat, students can toast cookies in the toaster to make them yummy and warm. “Another tip I’d give to students is that If one station is out of a condiment or topping you like, always check a different station. There will more than likely be one with some. It’s really just learning the hacks for the dining hall, and making the most of the situation.” The dining hall also provides meals to the university community through various fast-food chains that are open on campus. This includes a student favorite– The 1845 Grill, which is also located in the Bawcom Student Union building. The grill is known for the fresh foods it serves at a reasonable price. Their hours range from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Fridays, and 7 p.m. to 12 a.m. on Sundays. Some of these times vary by day, which allows students to enjoy various dishes such as pancakes or tacos between classes. “Honestly, it’s nice to get a burger from the Grill every few days,” said Freshman Criminal Justice major,...

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Students influence Belton economy
Feb08

Students influence Belton economy

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells UMHB has been an integral part of the economy of Belton since its arrival in 1886, after it split from Baylor College in Independence. Now, UMHB brings in an undergraduate campus enrollment of 3,900 students and employs about 400 full-time faculty and staff. Though Belton may be small, with its population of just over 19,000 residents, it has a thriving small business economy and bustling downtown. While there are plenty of places to spend your money here in Belton, there are some local landmarks that stand out to UMHB students. Starbucks While also bearing an on-campus location, UMHB’s Starbucks does not have a full menu and leaves some students still craving their caffeine fix. The first Starbucks in Belton, located off of I-35 South and Head Rd., has only been open for four years, and is amazingly the only Starbucks between Temple and Round Rock. This circumstance paired with UMHB students makes for a crowded coffee shop, according to barista Jeremy Kudlac. “We are one of the busiest stores in the area,” Kudlac mentions as he quotes figures between $4000-$7500 per day. “Our busiest time of the year is when the semester first starts and when it ends, and it really dies down over summer and winter break.” Luckily, the new Starbucks is less than a mile away from campus and accepts gift cards. Arusha’s Arusha’s, the cool hipster hangout for Beltonians and Crusaders alike, is the culminating dream of Tunisian and UHMB alumnus Hatem Couchane, who worked in the coffee industry for 15 years prior to Arusha’s opening. Couchane purchased the building after the previous coffee shop there decided to sell. The relaxed and unhurried atmosphere of the downtown coffee shop lends for a perfect place to study, play pool or escape the stresses of class for a few minutes (or hours). All coffee beans are roasted in-house every week, and there are over 100 tasty and exotic teas to choose from. Frosti Cones Frosti Cones, a staple for UMHB students, has served Crusaders for over seven years. Located on the corner of Waco Road and 13th street, Frosti Cones is a can’t-miss snack spot for students returning to school at the tail end of summer. Even furry companions of Frosti Cones guests get snow cones during the hot months of summer. Chick-Fil-A There is something about Chick-Fil-A that the Cru just can’t get enough of. While there is an on-campus Chick-Fil-A restaurant, it doesn’t offer menu items like mini chicken sliders or Chick-Fil-A’s famous milkshakes. Thursday nights, however, students can go to the Temple location off of...

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Non-traditional students share stories of second chances, hope
Feb08

Non-traditional students share stories of second chances, hope

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells What do a 37-year-old single mom and a 61-year-old grandmother have in common? They are both non-traditional students at the university. Whether they’re former military or just having a second act, non-traditional students ages 25 and above make-up 22.5 percent of the university population. Junior Elena Aydelotte is a single mother of three working towards a public relations degree. When Aydelotte had children, she still had a dream to go to school, so she made a deal with her husband. She would stay home with the children until the youngest started school and then she could attend college. Before this deal could come to fruition, Aydelotte’s marriage sadly ended. So, she packed up her family, and moved back to Temple from North Carolina. As Aydelotte explored her next steps, she realized she had two options: go to work or attend college. The young mother decided she would explore her college options. With her best friend by her side, she walked into the UMHB admissions office for some advice. “I walked in and they’re like arms wide-open, ‘Welcome to UMHB,’ and I was like, ‘I just need an application. I don’t know if I can even afford to go here.’” She began a conversation with one of the admissions counselors and discovered that the counselor’s mother had gone back to school when she was a single mother, and eventually earned her degree. “By the time I walked out of that office, we were hugging, crying, and they were welcoming me to UMHB. I walked away with a neon billboard light going off in my mind saying ‘this is where you need to be.’” Aydelotte wants single moms to know that their story isn’t over because of the grace of God. She encourages them to reach for their dreams, no matter the hardships they’re faced with. She said He [God] has a message for other single moms too. “The dream He’s placed in their hearts is still valid. It’s not void, and they can accomplish it.” Aydelotte loves UMHB because she can openly profess her faith and learn at the same time. “The university was founded by women of faith, and all their traditions continue on, and I’m honored to be a Crusader.” Aydelotte has busy days between going to school, taking care of her family, getting homework and housework done, attending church, and somehow enjoying a social life as well. She firmly believes that having a relationship with God is how she gets through the day. “He gives me the extra grace and energy to do it,” she said. “Spending...

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Four-year engineering program to be offered in Fall 2017
Feb08

Four-year engineering program to be offered in Fall 2017

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells Beginning in the fall of this calendar year, UMHB’s pre-engineering program will broaden into a full four-year engineering degree. According to a press release on Jan. 23, students will now be able to receive a Bachelor of Science in Engineering Science, either in a general engineering, or in the mechanical or electrical specializations. Previously students would’ve had to transfer to another university to finish out the degree. “This change is by far better for me,” said junior mechanical engineering major Kasey Gaar-Humphreys. “It allows me to graduate with a Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering rather than simply continuing in engineering science. I can now complete my upper level courses here, rather than being forced to transfer to complete my degree. I can also apply to graduate school at other universities.” For the past six years, students in the pre-engineering program took general courses during their first few years on campus. Once those courses were completed, the student would transfer to another school. UMHB even had a cooperative program set up with Baylor’s School of Engineering and Computer Science, where once a student had completed the requisite number of hours here, they could be recommended for transfer to Baylor, though acceptance was not guaranteed. “The small university atmosphere is just very attractive as a student,” Gaar-Humphreys said. “I get more one-on-one time with my professors in classes that are very challenging. At larger universities such as A&M or UT, who have very strong engineering programs, there aren’t those connections with their students.” The new program will include courses in physics, mathematics, and mechanical and electrical engineering. According to the Engineering Science page on the UMHB website, career opportunities in the field include electrical and electronics, environmental, biomedical, health and safety, mechanical, computer hardware, and materials engineering. “I’m hoping to use this degree to get into grad school, and after that I really want to pursue a career in the renewable energy industry,” Gaar Humphreys said.” I feel the job growth for engineers is very strong there. I hope to do my part to push for more renewable energy sources to be available to this country and the world, and make an impact for the future.” Many of the classes in the engineering degree plan match up with those on every plan– Public Speaking, New and Old Testament, and Chapel. But theirs includes classes that most do not like Numerical Algorithms and Thermodynamics. “Hopefully now that we have a full program, more students will seek this university out for engineering and further grow this school,” Gaar- Humphreys said. “It’s been...

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Where are they now- Barry Elkins
Feb08

Where are they now- Barry Elkins

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells Barry Elkins entered UMHB as a freshman in 1992 and graduated with a Physical Education major and a biology minor in 1997. He received his teaching certificate from the university and went on to teach biology in public school while coaching soccer. While at UMHB, Elkins played soccer from 1992-1995 as no. 15 and tennis from 1993-1995. It was during this time that he met his wife. They now have two teenage boys and live here in Belton. Elkins attended UMHB before it had a football program and the school was considered an NIA school instead of an NCAA school. After graduating, Elkins taught biology for 15 years in Belton ISD and coached soccer for the school system. Then, in 2012, there was an opening as the women’s soccer coach here at UMHB. Elkins said he knew some of the coaches who worked at UMHB and believed the university was a great place to work. He applied for the position and was offered the job. Elkins claims that when he first moved jobs it was weird getting used to not having over 100 students to teach. Now he could just focus on his team of around 30 girls. He says that interacting with the students was his favorite part of his teaching career, but he adjusted easily to coaching his team instead of teaching 200 students. And he says he enjoys what he does here at UMHB. Elkins has worked as the head coach for the past five years and says he wouldn’t want to be anywhere else. He wants to continue coaching for as long as he can. As head soccer coach for the women’s team, he is required to coach them in soccer, but he also helps them grow and become the best students they can be when they are not on the field. Elkins believes being an alumnus of UMHB has helped him when it comes to the recruiting part of his job. Knowing the students’ side has helped him to understand the school and what makes the school enjoyable to students. He tries to help new recruits fall in love with the school like he did. “I came to play soccer, but I stayed because I enjoyed the school,” Elkins...

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