BSM restructure encourages involvement
Sep28

BSM restructure encourages involvement

UMHB’s Baptist Student Ministries recently experienced a leadership restructuring that leaders hope will get more students involved in campus ministry opportunities and bring students closer to Christ. The BSM is now divided into nine emphases, according to BSM Director Shawn Shannon. The nine divisions are: Campus Outreach, Church Relations, Community Partnerships, Faith in Action, Freshmen Outreach, International Engagement, Promotions, Specialized Ministries, and Student Missions. One or two Lead Team members head each emphasis. Three Core Team leaders oversee the Lead Team members. Then, Dr. Shannon and Assistant Dir ector Karl Baker split the emphases that they oversee. Each emphasis has several ministries underneath it. For example, under the Specialized Ministries emphasis, students can be involved in Drama Ministry, Heart for the Nations, and Worship in the Quad. Underneath Community Partnerships, there is Raising Arrows, Hope for the Hungry and Children’s Ministry. Shannon said that the flexibility to add various ministries under each emphasis is an advantage. “We had a freshman student that arose that said, ‘I really want to work with senior adults.’ So, by two weeks later we have a group going out to Park Place,” Shannon said. “Since then, we’ve had two other students come to us with ministries that will fit well under Community Partnerships.” The Gathering, which is held every Tuesday evening at the BSM building at 7:30 p.m, was created as a part of this restructure, so that students can meet with the Lead Team members to learn more about each emphasis, and how they can get involved. “During the Gathering, we usually have a “big group” time, which is unique every week… After that, we break out into each ministry emphasis, and students are welcome to attend any breakout session that interests them,” said junior Christian studies major Bekah Gaff who serves as a lead team member of Promotions. Shannon likes the Gathering because students can visit with each emphasis to find out where their strengths will best be used and cultivated. “It’s kind of like going to Sam’s on Saturday; there’s samples, so you can check things out,” Shannon said. Baker said that the Gathering is an easy on-ramp to get involved with ministries immediately. “If you showed up next week [to the Gathering], then you could jump into any of our 9 emphases, and make a real contribution right away,” he said. “Previously, it took a little more time. You could go to a ministry and learn more about it, but you were localized to just that one experience. You weren’t really tapping into the whole picture of the BSM.” Shannon said that her goal for the BSM is to nurture...

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Hershall Seals presents: a Moby Dick Experience
Sep28

Hershall Seals presents: a Moby Dick Experience

By Haylee Jorgensen Contributing Writer As the first Fine Arts Experience of the 2017 fall semester, Mr. Hershall Seals unveiled his exhibition, A Moby Dick Experience, in the Baugh Visual Arts gallery on Monday, Aug. 21. The exhibit ran through Friday, Sept. 22 “I was excited and grateful to all who came to the artist talk at the opening of the exhibit,” Seals said. “Over two hundred people in attendance was easily the largest group I ever presented to. I was pretty nervous and glad I had prepared my thoughts.” Around 15 years ago, Seals began his transition from realistic to abstract painting. “It was as if I had an artistic ‘mid-life crisis.’” Seals said. “Emotional and intellectual stretching was helped by reading what Melville had to say about leaving the safety of the port to explore the ‘howling infinite’ where ‘resides the highest truth.’ This metaphor helped me navigate a different way of making art.” Seals Melville’s “Moby Dick” along with Dr. Phil Dunham, who acted as a coach to Seals in his “voyage into abstraction.” “We taught art together at UMHB for 23 years until his death in December of 2012,” Seals said. “This exhibit is my way of honoring his influence on my life.” Seals’ three exhibition paintings represented the last three chapters of “Moby Dick,” and the gallery was brought to life through his use of sound, light, temperature and scent. Seals enlisted the help Mr. Larry Locke, associate dean of the McLane College of Business and associate professor, to record the gallery’s sound loop reciting the last three chapters of “Moby Dick,” which played alongside whale songs. The lights of the gallery were turned off, only l eaving spotlights on Seal’s three multimedia pieces. An interior wall was installed to keep light from the hallway shine in. The temperature of the gallery was slightly lowered, and a salted Scentsy was placed in it to imitate the smell of the ocean. “One thing I took away from the exhibit was a greater appreciation for abstract work,” sophomore studio art major and psychology minor, Bronwyn Taff, said. “I tend to prefer more realistic pieces, but seeing Mr. Seals’ abstract oceans, with a hint of realism thrown in, was very cool. Also, as a studio artist, I know how intriguing multimedia is to work with, and Mr. Seals used it very effectively.” Taking all of this into consideration, Seals’ exhibit was a huge success. “Personally, I thought the exhibit was well conceived, interesting, well crafted, professional in concept, technique and execution,” Barnes said. “And it was a unique, intelligent take on the last three chapters of Moby...

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Cru kennels Bulldogs 50-7
Sep28

Cru kennels Bulldogs 50-7

UMHB administered a Saturday-night beatdown to the Texas Lutheran University Bulldogs, outscoring their opponents by 43 points and improving to 3-0 on the season. The Crusader defense held TLU scoreless until the final seconds of the game, when a garbage-time touchdown preserved a little of the bulldogs’ dignity. UMHB started the game by making a statement. After the Cru forced a Bulldog fourth down on their opening possession, TLU took a chance and attempted to continue their drive. Junior linebacker Santos Villarreal had other plans, and intercepted the fourth down pass, crushing the Bulldogs’ hopes of a productive opening drive. “I read the O-line and saw it was going to be a pass,” Villarreal said. “The quarterback threw a funny ball, and I knew I had to make the pick.” This takeaway set the tone for the game, and gave the Cru excellent field position, which they capitalized on, scoring their first points of the game a few minutes later. After a fourth down conversion from junior running back Markeith Miller, junior quarterback TJ Josey threw a laser, hitting senior wide receiver Bryce Wilkerson in the end zone for 6 points. For the rest of the first quarter and throughout the second, the Crusader offense continued to be efficient, never missing an opportunity to score. Senior kicker John Mowery hit two field goals, and sophomore quarterback Kyle Jones orchestrated a spectacular touchdown drive. Jones went 4/4, passing for 84 yards on the drive, before Miller took a direct snap at the Bulldog 2-yard line and punched the ball into the end zone for six points. Quarterbacks Josey and Jones both had a favorite receiver Saturday night — sophomore Jonel Reed. The receiver had a monster game, including hauling in a third quarter touchdown from Jones and catching back-to-back passes during Jones’ prolific second-quarter drive. One play from that drive turned many heads. “I lined up to run a post route,” Reed said. “I watched the corner turn his hips, and I knew he w as beat. Then I just had to get the ball.” Reed hauled in the pass, giving the Cru excellent position to finish the drive with a touchdown. The Crusader defense looked frightening, recording five takeaways. In addition to Villareal’s interception, freshman safety Jefferson Fritz and senior cornerback Reggie Wilson picked off the TLU quarterback once apiece. Junior safety D’Andre Jackson recovered a fumble to start the Bulldogs’ second possession, ending it after a single snap. Finally, sophomore defensive end De Jackson recovered a strip sack in the fourth quarter and returned it for a touchdown. Those points would be the last of many nails in...

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Cleaning up the damage: Hurricane Harvey sweeps through 54 Texas counties, 70 dead
Sep18

Cleaning up the damage: Hurricane Harvey sweeps through 54 Texas counties, 70 dead

The long clean-up process continues for those affected by Category 4 Hurricane Harvey after it hit the Texas shore four miles east of Rockport with winds reaching up to 130 miles, on Friday, Aug. 25, at 9:45 p.m. It retreated only to return and hit land once again at midnight as a Category 3, at the northeastern shore of Copano Bay. Hurricane Harvey brought record amounts of rain to other areas, dumping more water than Hurricane Katrina, Sandy and Andrew combined. Over 50 inches of rain accumulated in the state of Texas, and Governor Greg Abbott declared a state of disaster in 54 counties (gov.Te xas.gov). Many people found themselves stranded on the roofs of their homes, and had to be rescued by boat. The death toll for Harvey has reached at least 70, and now Hurricane Irma has added to the nation’s death toll, as at least 15 have died in Florida. Senior public relations major Lynsey May, who is from Kingwood, Texas, said that her family was forced to evacuate due to the rising waters. Although the waters have now receded, when we spoke with May last Monday, water levels in her home were still rising. “The water has reached the inside of my house that is seven feet off the ground,” she said. “It has affected my family’s business and forced us not only to evacuate ourselves but our 29 horses as well.” May worried that her home would not be there when the waters finally receded. “We laid every brick of our barn. We danced on the floors of our house when we were building it. The memories will always be there, but the actual place that I call home might not be there.” Senior public relations major Paige Mareth, who is from Victoria, Texas, said that her parents chose to remain at her childhood home and weather the storm. “They’re without water and electricity and it may be that way for a while,” she said on Monday, Aug. 28. Mareth said that although it’s been an emotional week, she is thankful that her home sustained minimal damage. “Not everyone else in my little city was as fortunate, and that’s hard to know,” she said. Evacuees began arriving in Bell County from Brazoria County early Monday, Aug. 28. They were first transported to the Expo Center, where they were given dry clothes and shoes, and then taken to shelters that had been set up around Bell County. Vista Community Church took over the process of receiving donations. Volunteer Coordinator for Bell County, Lacey Dove, said that it was truly humbling to see the evacuees arriving...

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Loss of house, not home
Sep18

Loss of house, not home

By Rachael Hopson Contributing Writer The words house and home are usually synonymous, but to the residents of Memorial Hills, the word “home” has taken on a com pletely new meaning. This neighborhood on the northeast side of Houston stood together through the excessive flooding of Hurricane Harvey and after. People came from near and far to help the area with rescue efforts. Anne Mentlewski, a homeowner of 28 years in the neighborhood, was particularly worried about her neighbors in the hours prior to the flooding. She lives across the street from several elderly couples who she loves dearly. “I don’t see them every day, but I always know what’s going on in their lives.” As she watched the news and heard the forecast of water levels at eight feet above record, she couldn’t believe it, especially after they had survived hurricanes Alicia and Ike with no water damage. Throughout the weekend of Aug. 26, she continued to watch the drainage ditch in the center of the neighborhood. She always checked on it when flooding was a possibility, and knew that even if it filled, they should still be fine. It wasn’t until Sunday evening that she started to realize evacuation may be necessary. As the water continued to rise into her street, she decided she was going to leave, but first wanted to check on her neighbors and hopefully convince them to do the same. While some had already had their families pick them up, others decided that they would stay through the storm. Before Mentlewski left, she asked her brother-in-law to check up on them and rescue them if necessary. After Mentlewski safely got to her son’s house, rain continued to pour, and overnight, the water got high enough to reach the houses on her street. It was only after several feet of water got in their houses that two of the elderly couples decided they needed help evacuating. Since no vehicles could get through, Charlie Mentlewski found an inner tube and, one by one, rescued five people from their flooded houses over the next three hours. After everyone was safely out of the area, they had to wait to be able to re-enter the neighborhood and assess damage. It wasn’t until Wednesday that they were able to see their houses. “The worry wasn’t about the physical aspect of the damage, but about my neighbors and what they would have to deal with,” Mentlewski said as she spoke about seeing her street for the first time after the flood. While the devastation was incredible, the amount of love and support from everyone’s friends and families was even...

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Hurricane affects students
Sep15

Hurricane affects students

By Emily Mahan Contributing Writer Many students experienced hurricane damage to their homes. Sophomore Kirsten DeSpain’s home, which is located north of Houston’s city limits, was flooded. “I think that the majority of relief efforts are focused in Central Houston, but what people don’t realize is that other communities lost their homes, and it’s important to remember those towns and cities as well.” Many other students like DeSpain live outside of Houston’s city limits in smaller communities that saw the effects of the hurricane. However, much of the media coverage has been on the impact inside the city. Smaller cities that saw massive flooding include Lake Jackson, Alvin, and Freeport, which are located in Brazoria County. Evacuees of this county were sent to Bell County on buses when the flooding reached dangerous levels. Many students have volunteered to assist these evacuees who arrived in Belton, Killeen, Temple and Harker Heights. Students donated clothing, food, toiletries, and a variety of other items to Vista Community Church, who collected donations for the evacuees. In addition to dropping off donations, many students volunteered to help sort through and organize these items throughout the week after the hurricane. Some students volunteered to spend time with and prepare meals for the evacuees at local churches. UMHB junior Kelly Taylor spent time with the children staying at First Baptist Church Belton, which served as a temporary home for refugees. “Getting to play with these kids who have already lost so much and…just being able to distract them and love on them was really cool.” She developed a special bond with two little girls in particular, and enjoyed playing games with them throughout the week. “One of them was old enough to understand what was going on, but the other was too young. She was just upset that she had to wear an identification bracelet.” Taylor said that she is glad that she volunteered with the evacuees, because it gave her a chance to comfort children who had lost everything they owned. UMHB has offered to help students who were affected by the storm. Students requiring additional financial support because of the hurricane are encouraged to contact the Financial Aid office in order to discuss their situation. In addition, the school has resources available for students who need extra academic support, prayer or...

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