Student react to campus-wide cricket invasion
Oct26

Student react to campus-wide cricket invasion

Published in the Oct. 26, 2016 issue of The Bells They come by the thousands every fall, ravaging the streets and buildings of the university, hopping on unsuspecting victims, and causing terror amongst students. Their cold, dark eyes show passing victims no mercy. These detestable, abhorrent, horrific creatures are — crickets. Laura Beverly, a freshman studying mathematics and history with teacher’s certification, has witnessed the cricket attacks firsthand. “I had to kill two crickets in my room on the third floor. Another two, or maybe three, jumped in my hair. The funniest thing that happened though was everyone freaking out when there was a cricket at [my friend’s] dorm.” Another student, sophomore graphic design major Chriscina Lampkin has also dealt with the cricket infestation. “I thought the cricket invasion was really weird,” Lampkin said, “I’ve never seen crickets swarm like that anywhere. It didn’t even happen last year, so I’m still pretty confused.” According to CNN, the reason for the cricket plague is because of low temperatures. As a result, the crickets gather around places that are well-lit and mate – creating a swarm of annoying obstacles. “They were really bad at Mabee,” Lampkin said. “Before you walked in near the post office, they were all huddled in the corner. Not even just on the ground, but on the walls and the ceiling too. I was trying to avoid stepping on them, and I had to stop and look at them. One of them was dead and the other cricket was just sitting on top of it. I was just like, ‘are you mourning?’” “The crickets are gross,” said junior marketing major Kelly Carlin, “I work at Mayborn and when I had to go wash towels, the gym had crickets and it was disgusting.” While not a threat to people, the cricket’s erratic and unpredictable jumps can cause anyone to go into a frenzy. “I work at Academy and they were really bad the first night they came. They were swarming the lights, falling out of the sky, and jumping off of the shelves,” Lampkin said. Thankfully, many of the crickets at the university have died off. Unfortunately, that means there is dead cricket smell in the air. “Crickets have a smell. Not even a smell, but an odor. They smell like bad cat and dog food,” Lampkin said. There are still some crickets hopping around campus, determined to stay alive. Luckily, there are a few ways to get rid of the little buggers. Carlin suggests a good way to get rid of a cricket is to use a vacuum. Lampkin says that she sprayed Home Defense in her...

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Self-defense class teaches students awareness on-campus
Sep28

Self-defense class teaches students awareness on-campus

Published in the Sept. 28, 2016 issue of The Bells With the number of mass shootings growing by the day, “campus safety” is a popular news topic. However, as a private university with just under 4,000 students in attendance (that’s just under 7% of the population of Texas A&M), campus safety looks a little different to UMHB. So what does it look like to be safe on campus? What are the biggest threats on campus? What are the most common crimes committed here at UMHB? How do we defend ourselves when preventative measures have failed? These are some of the questions that officers Steve Carter and Kevin Mertz answered during their self-defense class, last Thursday evening in the Lord Conference Center. “The main goal of this class is to make students safe on campus,” said Carter. The officer said the biggest danger to students on campus is self-inflicted danger, or students putting themselves in harm’s way. Carter suggests avoiding potentially harmful or illegal situations like not bringing alcohol or drugs on campus. He also suggests that students take their things with them when they leave their vehicles and dorm rooms. “The most common crimes on campus are thefts,” the officer said. “We have thefts that happen from people coming from off campus to on campus, but we also have thefts that are student-to-student.” On-campus thefts are more than likely crimes of opportunity,” Carter said. That’s why the officer stressed so heavily the point of being aware of one’s surroundings and not being an easy target. Carter also cleared up for his self-defense class that any time you enter a vehicle when you’re not supposed to, it’s considered a break-in. After the informational portion of the class, the officers gave the students a tutorial on how to defend themselves against a physical assault. Carter believes that the best defense is being self-aware and being aware of your surroundings. He uses the verse, 1 Peter 5:8: “Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour,” to emphasize his points. “Your best weapon is your mind,” he said. “Your best defense is to be someplace else.” Carter also spoke about listening to “that little voice” that alerts us to when something is wrong. “Listen to that voice,” Carter said. “Don’t ignore it. At the police department, every one of us believes in that little voice; that it is more in tune with your surroundings than you are.” As a precursor to learning basic attack moves from Mertz, he told the attendees that the class was not meant to teach you...

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Students ‘Reach Out’ to help community
Apr20

Students ‘Reach Out’ to help community

The University of Mary Hardin-Baylor participated in a local volunteer program called “Reaching Out” on Saturday, April 2. The annual event is a student-led program run by the UMHB Student Government Association that helps local businesses and families through service projects. Registration for Reaching Out began at 8 a.m. and projects were completed from 9 a.m. until noon. An estimated 350 students, staff and faculty volunteered on Saturday around Bell County. Students from the Belton Christian Youth Center had students helped set up a game room. CAB and other on-campus organizations helped build and deliver playhouses. Some students cleaned up the Belton park, and the Astra organization helped with the Heart Walk registration. Students also helped assist with projects that benifited organizations like Feed My Sheep, Hope Pregnancy Center, and Habitat for Humanity. “Community service doesn’t fit into one mold,” said junior, political science major, Brodie Cutts.“Service comes in all shapes and sizes, it doesn’t have to be just picking up trash. It can be getting together with your co-workers and building a playhouse for a little kid who might not get one otherwise.” Cutts helped build playhouses for military families with the Residence Life group and said that not only did he enjoy helping the needy families, but he also enjoyed working alongside his friends and co-workers. “We got to joke around and get to know oeach other in a relaxed environment, which is always good,” he said. Shelby Rogers, a sophomore psychology major worked with Circle K, First Year Council, and the Lion’s Club on cleaning up the Belton Park for a BMX trail. “My favorite part was seeing how different [the park] looked before and after.” Rogers said not only did they make the park sparkle but she and her group also found a ton of useful items they never expected to find. “We found a living room set and an artificial Christmas tree,” she said. “We also found clothes, more furniture, and a ton of tires.” The Campus Activities Board (CAB) also helped deliver the playhouses for military families. “It was so fun getting to see the little girl’s face light up as we took the playhouse out of the truck and placed it in her backyard,” sophomore marketing major, Emily Parker said. After delivering the playhouse, the group helped paint the structure for the family. “It was wonderful seeing this little girl have so much fun.” she said. Reaching Out has helped many businesses and families around Belton, Parker said. It continues to build strong bonds between the community and UMHB...

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FYC turns freshmen into leaders on and off campus
Apr20

FYC turns freshmen into leaders on and off campus

First Year Council is an organization exclusively for freshmen leaders. In FYC, students develop leadership skills, help other organizations on campus, and plan two major campus events. “FYC gives first year students on campus the opportunity to develop Christian leadership skills with a bunch of Christian backgrounds and Christian ethics behind it,” junior cell biology major, and FYC leader Thomas Middleton, said. “FYC has been one of the greatest experiences I’ve had. Being in it as a freshman as a member, and now being the head leader, I’ve gotten to see both sides of it. It’s opened up my eyes as to what it means to be a leader.” FYC meets every Monday at 9 p.m. to play games, discuss techniques to become better leaders, have devotional time, and build relationships. There are 45 total members in FYC. Every year the organization holds two main events: Date Auction and Spring Formal. These events take many hours to plan and execute, and helps these students put their leadership skills to the test. Date auction is held in the fall semester to raise money for the Spring Formal. Last semester, FYC raised $1500 to go towards formal. Date auction is an annual tradition that allows female students to bid on dates that male students have created. The highest bidder wins the date. This year’s auction included a day hammocking in the quad, dinner at The Gin, a trip to SpareTime, and various others. “[Date Auction] was a really fun experience for all of us. It was our first big event to work together on, and it was crazy to see the whole event come together,” freshman communication public relations major, Jenna Forrester said. While Date Auction is a fun event to plan, the Spring formal is the big event students look forward to all year. This year’s Spring Formal was held at Tenroc Ranch in Salado on Saturday, April 9. “[Spring Formal] is a time to come together, dance, have fun, eat a little food, and just be silly with our friends,” Middleton said. The theme was “Fly Me to the Moon,” and students had the option to pose with a moon at a photo booth. FYC hired DJ Jeremy for the entertainment, and students munched on sliders, pizza slices, and other various food items. If students didn’t want to dance, they could join in on a spirited game of giant Jenga or walk along the trails by the facility. FYC is devoted to serving the university and community in any way they can. Along with planning some of the university’s biggest events, FYC has also helped with football games and...

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Crusaders build playhouses for military families
Apr20

Crusaders build playhouses for military families

The beginning of April brought not only April showers in preparation for our May flowers, but also CAB’s Cru Playhouses for military families. Each year, mulitple associations around campus make a playhouse for military families. The event was done the weekend before Reaching Out, in conjunction with the service event, and continued throughout the week. Students delivered the houses at the end of the week and then painted them with the families. This event not only benefits those receiving the playhouses, but those working on the projects as well. Each year, the event draws out both positive vibes and great times, for the participating families and students. “Cru Playhouse’s is something we do every year at the Campus Activities office,” said Victoria Fae, a senior cell biology major. “We purchase 10 to 12 playhouses every year, and different organizations sponsor each house.” Fae explained that the organizations help military families not only off campus, but also those on campus as well. “We build [the houses] during the whole week with the organizations. During the week leading up to [Reaching Out] we deliver the playhouses,” she said. Fae has participated in building playhouses since her freshman year. She enjoys impacting so many military families. “My favorite part is delivering the houses that Saturday with my organization,” Fae said. “It’s just really fun to decorate with them and meet the children, play with them, and give them something that’ll last for a long time.” The children that receive the playhouses get to play and hang out with the UMHB students and volunteers while they were painting the houses. Often times, the military families recieving the houses are also UMHB students. The playhouses are given to military families as an appreciation and gratitude gift from the school. “My favorite part was building the houses,” said freshman marketing major, John Merritt. “We build houses for the kids so that they can have fun and use their imagination.” This serves as a time for fellowship within the community and the campus. It brings students closer together with those currently serving in the military and those who are no longer...

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Cru Culture: Stress-Away; The final Leg of the Spring semester
Apr20

Cru Culture: Stress-Away; The final Leg of the Spring semester

As the semester winds down, students become anxious and stressed to complete the school year. After months and months of study groups, late night snacking, and sleepless nights, it is time to say goodbye for awhile and enjoy the summer. However, at this point in the semester, many students feel burnt out and the finish line becomes hard to see. Don’t worry, you are not in this alone. Three weeks may feel like a lifetime at this point, but soon enough we will be walking out of our last final. And although stress is something you hear people say all the time, it is a real thing and can be affecting you more than you know. So, it’s important to find ways to de-stress. The university will have puppies on campus for the Play Day events on April 14, because they have been proven to lower your blood pressure. But if you can’t get out to pet the puppies, here are five de-stressors that will help you get through the rest of the semester. 1. Listen to Music Listening to classical music is a great way to slow down and de-stress. According to the Huffington Post, this type of music “slows your heart rate, lowers blood pressure and even decreases levels of stress hormones.” However, any music that you enjoy can “flood your brain with feel-good neurochemicals like dopamine,” according to the site. So, grab a pair of earphones, open Spotify and listen to your favorite songs. You can even make a Stress Relief Playlist. 2. Chew Gum According to a 2008 study, chewing gum can “relieve anxiety, improve alertness, and reduce stress during episodes of multitasking.” Another plus is that your breath will smell amazing. 3. Turn Off Your Phone I know it sounds crazy, (absolutely insane) but power your phone off. Take an hour or two and stay off social media, restrict yourself from texting or calling. When we are constantly on our phones, our brains are constantly at work and trying to take in what is all around us. When our phones are on, we feel pressured to respond to all of our messages and calls. Studies show that talking on the phone can raise your blood pressure. Taking time away from social interaction can give your brain a break and space to think. Plus, it is also a good way to actually get homework done. 4. Eat Candy (Reasonably) Consuming something sweet can reduce stress in a great way. This is because it “stems the production of the stress hormone, glucocorticoid.” While this may sound great, this is also the reason why “emotional eating” is...

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