A few steps, a final stride, a new life
Apr21

A few steps, a final stride, a new life

May 9 will mark more than just a celebration of accomplishment. It will also bring to light the panic for graduates of what is next. As the economy tightens, and the hefty number of students crossing graduation stages, the National Association of College Employers says, “Employers expect to hire 22 percent fewer graduates than last year.” At least five UMHB students know their next steps. Furthering Education Business management major, Elliott Powell, will go to graduate school at Azusa Pacific University in Azusa, Calif., for a degree in college counseling and student development. He said he hopes to eventually work his way up into a university vice president of student affairs position. As he works toward his degree, he has received a job at the university’s office of Student Success. Planning for this began when a  friend encouraged him to pursue a master’s in college counseling and student development. “I never saw myself being completely happy while working at a business, but I will love working with college students,” Powell said. He said UMHB has helped with the transition by providing him many opportunities. “It’s really easy to get plugged in here, and I think my involvement on campus really helped me get a job,” Powell said. As the time gets closer, his excitement is building. “I always knew I wanted to try something brand new after graduating, and I definitely think this is it,” he said. “This will give me a wonderful opportunity to grow as an individual because it will put me out of my comfort zone.” Medical pursuits Nursing major Angela Wass’ post-graduation plans include a 16-week internship as a pediatric intensive care unit nurse at Scott and White Hospital in Temple. She wanted to stay in the area. So when she got the official job offer in March, Wass was thankful God answered her prayers. After her rigorous training through the College of Nursing, she said it has more than adequately prepared her for any nursing career. Wass said she is excited to begin using what she knows. “I cannot wait to start and see what God has planned,” she said. “It will also be a challenge to see how well I can do on my own.” Trained to care Athletic training major, Laurie Martin, will apply her classroom experience to life as she becomes an athletic trainer for Lorena Independent School District. The recent confirmation unnerved her and brought great joy. “I am really excited to be going out into the ‘real world,’” she said. “Of course, I am a little nervous because I am going to be the only athletic trainer at the high...

Read More
Center for Academic Excellence  prepares for future advancements
Mar31

Center for Academic Excellence prepares for future advancements

By Russell Dotson Sidewalk chalk writing around campus invites students to various organized study halls in the Center for Academic Excellence. The study halls and the walkways advertising are part of the many changes occurring in the CAE. Dr. Tammi Cooper, professor in the College of Business, is the new assistant dean of learning and student success. She will oversee the CAE and its secretary, Diane Gryseels. Cooper and Gryseels are working to create in the CAE an environment that attracts students, one where they feel welcome. The two will be reformatting the CAE’s Web site this semester. The site currently functions as an advertising and communication tool for Crusader Connection. “One of the goals for the spring is to have a Web site up for the CAE so students and faculty can have access to the resources and services we provide,” Cooper said. “We would like to make the CAE and its services more marketable to students.” Gryseels and Cooper are organizing meetings with various academic departments to learn how they can meet the needs of students. “We are going to spend time . . .  finding ways to communicate with students and increase awareness with what we do,” Cooper said. They are optimistic about the future for the CAE and its role in the academic lives of students. Cooper’s new office is located in the provost’s suite on the top floor of Sanderford. She is currently teaching two business courses, but after this semester, she will teach a freshman seminar and devote the remainder of her time to her new position. “In addition to overseeing the CAE,” Cooper said, “I’m excited about Crusader Connection, Freshman Seminar and other student retention initiatives. Our campus is full of talented professionals, and I’m blessed to have the opportunity to work with them on continually improving these various programs.” Last summer, Gryseels moved the CAE from Mabee to Hardy, a transition that she said was less painful than expected. The CAE now has six rooms in Hardy, offering students a computer lab, study halls, academic support counseling, tutors in a variety of subjects and an assortment of coffees and teas for $1 per cup. “The primary reason students come in, is to use the computer lab,” Gryseels said. The lab, located in room 109, has 18 computers. “Currently, printing is free in the lab, but we ask students to limit their printing to between 10 and 20 pages per visit,” she said. The CAE has 17 tutors who specialize in math, English, science, history, religion and quantitative business analysis courses. “Many of the students coming in for tutoring are freshmen, but...

Read More
Love for chemistry begins in youth, matures into passion
Mar31

Love for chemistry begins in youth, matures into passion

By Evangeline Ciupek Childress, Texas — Young Darrell Watson excitedly received a present from his father—a chemistry set. “I think (my father) was a little bit sorry, because I almost burned down our garage,” Dean of the College of Sciences Watson said. “But he was patient and always encouraged me … in science or basically anything I want.” His first chemistry course during his sophomore year of college, was taught by an enthusiastic instructor. “I just fell in love with chemistry after that,” Watson said. In 1983, the National Institutes of Health gave Dr. Harold Kohn a grant to produce a medicine to control seizures. The anticonvulsants on the market damaged patients’ livers. NIH was looking for a safer medication. Watson joined Kohn’s development team at the University of Houston. “I was kind of … a hired gun …. In all, there were about five of us that worked on the patent and the material,” Watson said. That summer, he finished the compound: a dipeptide formed from two amino acids. “It’s not all natural … but it is made from natural starting materials,” he said. A gram of the medicine was sent to the NIH for testing. At Bowling Green State University in 1998, Watson created a sensitizer molecule for stereolytho-graphy, the process of solidifying liquid plastic with a laser. “An item … that took anywhere from six to eight hours, with my new compound (took) less than two.” In 1992, Watson started Chem Camp, a yearly summer camp for elementary school kids. In 1994, he became dean of the College of Sciences. During National Chemistry Week in October, the Sigma Pi Chemistry Club puts on Demos in the Dark. “Anything that goes boom and burns, I like it.” Watson said. Senior chemistry and cell biology double-major Shannon Woodruff said, “We get a pretty good crowd with people coming in from as far as Cameron and Copperas Cove.” Secretary Lisa Maiden, has worked with Watson four years, and attends every year with her daughter. “There are exciting chemical demonstrations set to music, glowing chemical reactions, controlled explosions, cannons that shoot T-shirts and Nerf footballs,” Maiden said. “The children can make slime, and the students serve liquid nitrogen slushies.” In the summer, Watson’s students help him research, thanks to a $25,000 Welch grant. “He’s always willing to help his students in any fashion whatsoever,” Woodruff said. During the school semesters, they go to public schools “to get them excited about science,” Watson said. He hopes chemistry students stay motivated. “Perhaps they’ll go into industry, making new plastics or making better fuels. And I would encourage them very much to do...

Read More
Class to kayak for credit on Alaska trip
Mar31

Class to kayak for credit on Alaska trip

By Andra Holbrooks Dr. Jamey Plunk, Dr. Chifta Foster and Dr. Mickey Kerr, exercise sports science professors, along with several students (with majors other than EXSS), are taking a ten-day adventure trip through America’s largest state, Alaska. The students enrolled can earn up to five credit hours in the EXSS department. Shane Schneider said, “I have always wanted to go to Alaska, and I’m going on this trip to get the experience I have been waiting for.” Schneider is also going to receive PE credits for his degree. Trip planning has been underway for quite some time. The costs, daily agenda and lodging are all set up for the Aug. 5-14 trip. Plunk said costs “include tuition for class hours plus $1,400 to $1,800 dollars for airfare and other trip expenses. The class is limited to a total of 17 students.” Several spots are still available for the “once in a lifetime experience to get away from the city life,” as Kelsey Greeson, a junior business management major, described it. “Very few people get the opportunity to see Alaska at a reasonable cost, and it will definitely be an adventure,” Greeson said. Plunk said, “Registration for the summer and fall semesters won’t begin until next week, so we’re not exactly sure how many will be going yet.” Many students have not heard trip details. Flyers are posted around Mayborn and a slide show plays on the TV behind the connection desk for more information. The idea of the trip didn’t just come out of the blue. There are high hopes this first-time trip through UMHB could be one to add to the list of its traditions. “Dr. Cliffa Foster has a close friend, Brenda Crimm, who is a NAMB (North American Mission Board) missionary in Alaska,” Plunk said. “The two of them originally came up with the idea with the notion that this trip could become an annual event.” Professors and students will be staying at Crimm’s church, which will provide food, transportation and lodging. “None of the faculty going have ever been before,” Plunk said. It is sure to be quite an adventure. He said a daily agenda has been organized, but “will be modified according to weather conditions.” Alaska weather tends to change on the dime. “A typical day will consist of camping, angling or kayaking,” Plunk said. “I am most excited about getting to go to Alaska period,” Schneider said. “It has always been one of the top spots on my list of places to visit. I am also excited about going fishing. I love the sport and cannot wait, and I probably won’t want to...

Read More
Google mail to the rescue
Mar31

Google mail to the rescue

The return from spring break marks the time when students, faculty and staff begin preparing for the last sprint of the school year until finals. However, this year on March 23, an event known as G-Day went live in the SUB, allowing students to access their new campus Gmail accounts. Department of Information Technol-ogy application engineer, Tracy Martin, was on the team helping make implements in UMHB e-mail accounts. She explained that after the switch, the system is now “powered by Google.” This will allow users to have 2,000 times more space to hold information without having to continuously delete important e-mails. “We recognized there was a problem, and we needed to improve the student’s e-mail solution,” Martin said. “We asked for feedback from students. We did not just do it on our own. We got more than 200 Facebook surveys back, and students overwhelmingly supported a move to Gmail.” Angela Baker, hardware engineer, also helped organize G-Day and was impressed to see the outcome and reaction to all those involved in the switch. “It appears to be a really positive response. Students are coming in. A lot of them are excited,” Baker said. “Some of them are already familiar with Google and possibly already have an account there. So they realize the benefit available to them and all the other fun things that are coming along with the Google applications.” Sader mail used an older server, and IT felt that it was inconvenient for the students to face this issue. Baker said this will make e-mail entertaining and accessible. “The old account was really old, and it only allowed for so much space, and that was a big downfall for the students as far as using the e-mail for picture swapping, PowerPoint and other stuff,” she said. “They really had limited space. That alone is the biggest plus—the space that (Gmail) is going to give the students.” In many cases, students would access their Sader mail accounts, but would quickly have all their e-mail forwarded to other accounts. Freshman math major, Shaina Ryan, was excited to know that she could now have one mailing address. “I am really looking forward to actually being able to fully use my school e-mail address,” she said. “I already told all of my family and friends to start e-mailing me at my school account instead of my old one. I will most definitely start using my Sader mail as my primary e-mail account.” Junior Christian studies major Geoff Payne said, “I think the new Gmail accounts will provide a much simpler, more user-friendly interface for student e-mailing.” He thinks the goal was...

Read More
Dr. Seuss meets Olympics games
Mar31

Dr. Seuss meets Olympics games

Normal Olympics don’t feature cross-dressing figure skaters. Or “Dr. Seuss” characters playing beach volleyball. But these were not normal Olympics; they were the 2009 Crusader Olympics, the theme of the 105th annual Stunt Night, held at W.W. Walton Chapel March 27. Each student class selected three Olympic sports and was asked to perform a skit based on their choices, straining to outdo each other in humor, creativity and style. They competed for a slate of awards given by the audience and a panel of judges that included future UMHB first lady, Julie O’Rear, current first lady, Vicky Bawcom, and former first ladies, Marietta Parker and Ellen Tanner. The freshman class chose tae kwon do, basketball and artistic skating as their sports. They blended glow-in-the-dark karate fights, male “artistic skaters” in sequin dresses and lively dances to come out on top with the Judges Choice, Best Dance and Best Actor award for freshman exercise sport science major Seth Dickinson. Freshman performance and film studies major, Rachel Jeske, freshmen class co-director, is thrilled at what they accomplished. “We put in so much hard work and dedication,” she said. “There was some stress at first, but it turned out to be amazing. It’s just incredible, and I am so proud of all the freshmen.” The sophomores added a “Dr. Seuss” theme to their skit by rhyming  through beach volleyball, trampoline gymnastics and curling. Their whimsical apparel, based on characters from Dr. Seuss’s books, earned the award for Best Costume, but that was not important for sophomore education major, Julia McDonald. “When our class gets together, we have a good time,” she said. “We don’t care about awards. It’s about us dancing, looking stupid and having a good time.” The juniors performed the most popular skit of the evening, combining thick foreign accents with enthusiastic acting to win the Campus Choice award. Their sports included fencing, water polo and synchronized swimming. “It’s so great because now I know the audience liked it,” said junior elementary education major, Katie Leibert. “I had so much fun.” In their final performance for Stunt Night, the senior class chose the events of running, wrestling and floor gymnastics. Their story about a team of underdogs competing in the Olympics earned the Best Actress award for senior nursing and performance studies major Layne Grisham. Participating in the skit’s antics was senior computer science and computer graphics design major Blake Smedley, who portrayed an Olympic weight-lifter. “My favorite part was probably wearing really tight shorts on  stage, ripping off my T-shirts and just hanging out with the other  seniors,” he said. Stunt Night Co-director, Emily Williams, believes the evening was...

Read More
Page 82 of 89« First...102030...8081828384...Last »