Weathersbee invests in students’ lives
Sep21

Weathersbee invests in students’ lives

Over the summer, Dr. Byron Weathersbee was appointed as the Vice President for Student Life. In this role, he will oversee the spiritual, academic and physical needs of students by supervising various offices like residence life, career services and campus recreation. But Weathersbee does not sit in his office all day dictating rules and making decisions—he is actively pursuing the students’ best interest and is involved with daily campus activities. “We have a 2,700 student population. The student life vice president serves as the chief advocate for students to the UMHB administration,” said Dr. Steve Theodore, Vice President for Administration and Chief Operating Officer. “Dr. Weathersbee will sit at our President’s Council. He will sit at the table where all the decisions are made at this campus and…represent the student’s best interest.” Theodore served as the past vice president for Student Life from 2005 to 2009 and believes Weathersbee will be a perfect fit for the position. “He is a fantastic guy and a great friend who loves students and loves the Lord— what better combination could you have,” Theodore said. Working at UMHB is not Weathersbee’s first time on a college campus. Previously, he served as the interim university chaplain and as the sports chaplain at Baylor University where he spoke at chapel and before baseball games. It was right up his alley, considering he loves being outdoors. “I love to water ski and wake board. I love sports. I am a sports nut,” he said. Additionally, Weathersbee founded Legacy Family Ministries with his wife Carla where he continued to work with students and help them to understand who they are as individuals before becoming involved in a serious relationship. To spread his ministry Weathersbee planned to visit 25 college campuses in two years and give away 5000 books. He reached his goal in nine months by visiting 20 campuses and giving away 4000-4500 books. It was while on tour for his book, Before Forever: How do You Know That You Know?, that he realized he missed not being able to build strong relationships. He said, “I wanted to find someplace where I could invest my life into people and into a system that is investing their lives into people.” Weathersbee’s goal for his office is “to serve the directors of campus recreation and the nurse and student organizations in such a way that they can do their job with excellence, so that it enhances the whole experience that UMHB has to offer.” Weathersbee is excited about many of the school’s traditions and said he feels privileged to be a part of the inauguration of the university’s 22nd...

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Classes ‘turbo kick’ calories
Sep16

Classes ‘turbo kick’ calories

By Lauren Piercey Burning hundreds of calories in less than an hour has never been so easy. Mayborn Campus Center offers six Cru Fit classes for students to get involved in, an alternative to just jumping on the treadmill. Turbo Kick along with Crunch and Pump offers a good full body workout. Sophomore Doug Peak attends Turbo Kick, though the class attracts mostly women. “I don’t feel intimidated by the girls. The first day my workout partner was a girl,” he said. “It’s a work out for everyone, guy and girl, people in shape and people out of shape.” Burning hundreds of calories while doing something fun is one of the benefits. “It is an opportunity to get in a lot of cardio while acting like a fool and getting a little crazy. It’s a different way to get the workout in without dreading what you are doing or being repetitive,” Peak said. He believes more men should try it. “Other guys should defi nitely take the class because it’s intense and it’s a form of working out most men don’t do. It works you better than just the same old bench or treadmill,” Peak said. Sophomore Pearlie Gault got introduced to Turbo Kick through a friend. She said the class has its ups and downs. “The best part is how much fat you burn off doing it, but the hard part is catching on to the nonstop movements.” Junior Jacquie Case has been taking Turbo Kick since last spring, and she notices the improvements. “This class has really helped me tone up my body and I have seen amazing results from this class from building muscle, losing weight, strength and endurance,” she said. She cannot stay away from the workout. “Turbo kick is a lot of fun and addicting. I just can’t get enough of it. I need this class three days out of the week. Without it, I feel like there is something missing,” Case said. Jessie Oestreich is the instructor for both classes and has been teaching for 11 years. What some may not know is that Turbo Kick is actually the same as the kick boxing class she taugh last semester. “Last year was my first year to teach (Turbo Kick), and I wasn’t sure if I would like it as much as kick boxing or if it (would) go over well. It did, so we decided to call it Turbo,” she said. She has her favorite parts of the class. “There are very few fitness programs where you can burn 1,000 calories,” Oestreich said. Both classes involve some sort of resistance, especially Crunch and...

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Crusader sisters live, work in Morning Glory Inn
Sep16

Crusader sisters live, work in Morning Glory Inn

Two doors down from the university’s main entrance is the Morning Glory Inn. A velum banner hangs from the porch, “Grand Re-opening.” It’s a special bed and breakfast because new owners, Bruce and Valerie Mercer, have a third-generation connection to the university. When the previous owners had to sell, the Mercers jumped at the chance to run a bed and breakfast, with help from their daughters Erika and Andrea, both UMHB students. A cheery entryway welcomes guests. Old-fashioned transoms top the doors of this Victorian home and the original stained glass window is still in the parlor. Upstairs are three country-style guest rooms and bathrooms. In the 1920s, the house on the corner of Main and 11th streets was a school. “In the ‘20s, and maybe the ‘30s … UMHB actually had a kindergarten here,” Valerie said. From birthday parties for 12-year-olds to bridal showers, Morning Glory Inn is a busy place. Junior music education major, Andrea, enjoys this new venture. “One thing that took a bit of an adjustment was that now we don’t all live in the same house. Erika, Kristin, and I all live in the little cottage beside the big house …. It was strange at first … but now I love having our own place.” she said. Senior education major Erika Mercer balances her busy schedule at home and at school. “My day is filled with music. My family tries to eat dinner together every night, and we try to spend at least one night together to talk and enjoy each other,” she said. Cattle rancher Silas Bagget built the big house in 1886. The house across the street belonged to his son, Eli Bagget. The fireplace facade in the home built by Silas spurs a lot of questions. “That’s a mystery we’ve been trying to figure out because that home … is supposed to be a mirror image of this home. And you can see a fireplace over there. But there is no apparent evidence of (there) ever being a fireplace here,” Valerie said. Bruce’s father started teaching sociology at the university when Bruce was only 2 years old. Valerie and Bruce met as students. “I came for Welcome Week, and so I met him (at) my very first meal,” Valerie said. Breakfast at the Inn now features homemade granola, fruit compote and fresh baked bread. “I do have a bread maker. It’s a good servant,” Valerie said. She is always ready to cater the morning menu to the individual clientele. “I kind of try to listen and see or figure out what I think people like.” The Mercer children had the dream...

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Servant-hearted students receive awards, money
Sep16

Servant-hearted students receive awards, money

Two students received the Gary and Diane Heavin Servant Leadership Award at Convocation Aug. 28. Seniors Tommy Wilson and Audrey Chumchal were each given $1,000 to give to a non-profi t organization of their choice. The award is for two outstanding students who have given their time and talents as volunteers. They must have accumulated an impressive record of ministry or community service while at the university. International business major, Tommy Wilson, served in Kenya in missions during his freshman and his junior year. He has been involved with Reaching Out, a community service outreach program. In the fall of 2007, he took a group of students to the Beaumont area to clean up and rebuild after Hurricane Ike. He also spent a year in Hong Kong serving as the youth intern for a church. Christian ministry major, Jonathan Dean, who accompanied Wilson to Beaumont said, “Tommy had a great attitude that led everyone to accomplish their goals. He encouraged us to serve and put the needs of others before ours.” Wilson donated his money to Build The Village and Operation H2O, two organizations in Kenya. Build The Village establishes schools, houses and churches, and Operation H2O builds water wells. Wilson said, “…I have personally been there and (I know) the money will be put to good use. I know that through this, the workers can share Christ.” Audrey Chumchal, a biblical studies major, has helped out in the community since coming to UMHB. She has volunteered for Reaching Out and assisted the Federation of Women’s Club in Temple last fall with their fund raising. She was involved in Crusader Knights, Gamma Beta Phi, House Council, Stunt Night and also directed and taught sign language for the Easter Pageant. Chumchal has had a continuing role in the Miss MHB Pageant, been a residence hall assistant in Burt Hall and the Huckins Apartments and served as a University Ambassador. She visited Central Asia this summer for six weeks, worked with missionaries to establish a business platform and built friendships with the people living in the area. “While I was there, I had my eyes opened to the depravity of the world and the need for the truth of the Gospel. I also felt the call to suffer in the same way he did for his Kingdom,” said Chumchal. She has chosen to donate her money to a program called Bibles Unbound, run by the Voice of the Martyrs, which provides Bibles to countries around the world. Chumchal’s friends have taken notice of her spiritual growth and are pleased at what she has achieved so far. Friend J Larkin said, “She...

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Temple looks for young professionals

Temple Young Professionals, a new and rising committee in central Texas, is attracting students and local businesses for many reasons. Spherion Branch Manager and president of the organization Sol Melton said the idea for the group is to attract and retain the younger generation in the talent pool. “We target an age group 21-45,” he said, “The younger generation has a live first and work second attitude. That is a huge retention factor. Temple can have every job in the world but if it’s not a cool place to live, it won’t matter. The younger generation will move to a more culturally diverse and active city and then look for a job as opposed to getting a good job in Temple and then relocating here for it.” Joan Mikeska Realtor and Temple Young Professionals membership director Ali Thompson recommends that UMHB students get involved. “It’s a great opportunity for college students to meet people in the business world right now who can mentor them,” she said. “It will help them to locate a job when they graduate college.” Melton said people can use it as a networking opportunity for college graduates or rising seniors. “We offer after-hour events to ensure that we will fit the schedules of college students.” Temple Young Professionals meets once a month and has a guest speaker who discusses a local, national or international issue. “We rotate between a business lunch and a social afterhours,” he said, “We keep our members engaged in what’s going on in the city. Also, we discuss what they want done, and we discuss how to get it done.” The committee is essential for job networking and social group activities. “I lived in Temple for fi ve years before I found out there was an adult soccer league,” Melton said. “I probably would have known years ago about the opportunity if Temple Young Professionals had existed.” Extraco Banks insurance specialist Allison Lueck said Temple has needed this type of organization for quite some time. “Over the years, I have witnessed my parents’ generation do so much to help this community grow,” she said. “It’s time for our generation to step up as well. I hope Temple Young Professionals continues to grow and has a positive effect on our community.” The group is dedicated to increasing the city’s potential toward social and economical growth. “A service project is also in the future with the region,” he said, “All kinds of ideas are progressing, and we’re looking and listening for more.” Melton said young professionals need to be familiar with companies in the area. “If the person reviewing your resumé in human...

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Crusaders spend summer vacation on world missions
Sep16

Crusaders spend summer vacation on world missions

Several students had the opportunity to serve globally in missions last summer. From a university in Senegal, to the sandy, white beaches of Hawaii, Crusaders spent their vacations making a difference. One was junior Christian studies major and current Miss MHB Brianna Edwards, who went to Africa. “I left May 12 (for) West Africa, Senegal. My old youth minister has been a missionary there for two years,” Edwards said, “He’s been story-telling in villages around that area and didn’t have anybody to go into the university and work with students there.” Edwards wanted to help but didn’t know where he would need her. “I called him and asked if he had any missions for me … since I didn’t have the medical qualifications to be involved,” she said. “He told me he had been praying for somebody to come to open up doors with the university, and said if I was willing to teach English, he had a job for me.” Edwards helped at the university three days a week. “The other two days we went to a missionary school and taught drama,” she said, “At the university, they wanted to know more about America. It was real funny because they couldn’t pronounce ‘Brianna’ so they called me ‘Yama’, which made it fun.” The children had a wild curiosity about Americans. “They asked all kinds of questions – what we do, what we study (education),” she said, “I got to share that I study music, which made them want to hear me sing. Earlier that morning I woke up and had the song ‘Lead Me to the Cross’ stuck in my head. Therefore, I knew God wanted me to sing it. I got through the first chorus, and one girl stopped me and said, ‘Yama, that was beautiful. It sounded like a love song’ and asked what it meant. So I got to talk about how it is a love song about my Savior.” Back in the States, specifically on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, Miles O’Neil spent 10 weeks serving with another UMHB student and an alumna. O’Neil worked with junior Mark Miller and Dani Beth Crosby, the graduate who now resides in Hawaii. The three got their summer positions through the North American Mission Board. “The VBS included a Bible study, recreation and music class. In the afternoons we would have ukulele, Japanese and sign language classes too. We’d also take them on field trips once a week all over the island.” Traveling the island, however, isn’t what O’Neil remembers most. “The best part was getting to love on the kids, and they loved on us, too,”...

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